Inside Appalachia

Sundays 7am & 6pm

Inside Appalachia tells the stories of our people, and how they live today. Host Jessica Lilly leads us on an audio tour of our rich history, our food, our music and our culture.

Inside Appalachia is a production of West Virginia Public Broadcasting with help from public radio stations in Kentucky, Virginia, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee and West Virginia.

Affiliate Stations

  • Allegheny Mountain Radio – WVMR 1370 AM Frost, W.Va.; WNMP 88.5 FM Marlinton, W.Va.; WVLS 89.7 FM Monterey, Va.; WVMR 91.9 FM Hillsboro, W.Va.; Radio Durbin 103.5 FM; WCHG 107.1 FM Hot Springs, Va. - Saturday 7 a.m.
  • WETS, 89.5 FM, Johnson City, Tennessee - Sunday 6 p.m.
  • Morehead State Public Radio - WMKY 90.3 FM in Morehead, Kentucky, Saturday 6 a.m. and Sunday 11 a.m.
  • Appalshop Mountain Community Radio - WMMT 88.7 FM in Whitesburg, Kentucky - Sunday 11 a.m. & Tuesday 6 p.m.
  • WEKU 88.9 FM Eastern Kentucky University, Richmond, Kentucky - Saturday 6 a.m.
  • WSHC 89.7, Shepherd University, Shepherdstown, West Virginia - Sunday 9 a.m.
  • WUOT-2, 91.9 FM, Knoxville, Tennessee - Tuesday 7 p.m.
  • WVCU 97.7 FM, Concord University, Athens, West Virginia - Wednesday 5 p.m.
  • West Virginia Public Broadcasting - Sunday at 7 a.m. and 6 p.m.
  • WMOV 106.7 FM, Ravenswood, West Virginia - Saturday at 8:00 a.m.
  • WUKY 91.3 FM, Lexington, Kentucky, Sunday 8 p.m. and Tuesday at 7:00 p.m.

     

Ways to Connect

There are some innovative ideas in Pennsylvania for cleaning acid mine drainage.

We revisit the West Virginia Music Hall of Fame induction ceremony.

Some resilient West Virginia land is saved from development.

And Way Out in West Virginia goes mobile.

Acid Mine Drainage and Fracking: Abandoned mines leach metals and other pollutants into Pennsylvania's streams. Could fracking be one way to clean up this water? Reid Frazier, of The Allegheny Front, reports.

Eastern Kentuckians talk about their future.

While the struggle to find jobs for laid-off coal miners continues.

A Pennsylvanian reminisces about deer hunting.

An ultra-marathoner runs his way to good health.

Eastern Kentuckians are ready to talk about the future.  This was evident this past Monday when more than 1,500 people showed up in Pikeville for the first SOAR, the shaping our Appalachian region summit.  WMMT’s Sylvia Ryerson was at the event, and has this story.

Kentuckians get ready to SOAR.

A new book by photographer Builder Levy documents change in the coalfields.

A Tucker County W.Va. clock repairman marks his 90th birthday.

And the West Virginia Music Hall of Fame loses a member.

Folks in fracking country Pennsylvania work on air pollution issues.

Kentucky college students are having a blast- with some mine research.

America’s Test Kitchen has an Appalachian connection.

And we learn about the famed Fairfax Stone.

A southern West Virginia town works to revitalize itself.

Appalachia remembers John F. Kennedy’s assassination.

A bicyclist pedals across the country raising awareness of Lyme disease.

And a Kentucky writer discusses his latest book.

Justin Steiner / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

What are the potential side effects of cracker plants planned in West Virginia and Pennsylvania?

Some folks in Eastern Kentucky are having a potentially explosive problem with their wells.

Some hot doings on a cold day recently at West Virginia University.

And new inductees join the West Virginia Music Hall of Fame.

Reid R. Frazier / The Allegheny Front

The Appalachian Regional Commission aims to grow entrepreneurship.

The Gulf Coast provides a hint at what good, and bad, can come from a cracker plant planned for Pennsylvania.

A look at just what goes into making Tennessee moonshine.

And one West Virginia man tackles the problem of profound poverty.

Reid R. Frazier / The Allegheny Front

How much mine-able coal is left in Appalachia?

An old coal company store in Southern West Virginia has some spooky history.

We revisit the story of the Greenbrier Ghost, through the voices of school children.

And learn how growing a garden benefits women in a Pocahontas County prison facility.

Brian Allen / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Kentucky prepares to introduce new science education standards.

A report on the effects of natural gas fracking is due out soon.

And we hear from two West Virginia writers with books out just in time for the spooky season.

Cecelia Mason / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

A new Kentucky café caters to Alzheimer’s patients and their families.

Arts and Culture provide economic development in one Kentucky county.

A new book profiles one of West Virginia’s most picturesque river valleys.

And ink lovers turn out for the first WV tattoo expo.

Submitted Photo

Compressed natural gas is a hard sell despite all the drilling.

West Virginia native John Nash continues to inspire.

Traditional music lovers will soon be able to own The 1928 Johnson City Sessions.

And we take a trip to the quiet zone in West Virginia, shhhh.

Rt 219 Project

One of the most immediate effects of the federal government shutdown hits tourists.

A record number of raptors flew over an observation point in West Virginia recently.

A story teller puts a new twist on old Appalachian traditions.

And a Kentucky school program helps who want to children learn music.

States are getting ready for Obamacare.

One of this year’s Inspiring West Virginians is a businesswoman from Morgantown.

Kentucky’s Poet Laureate talks about his work and diversity in Appalachia.

And we visit a school in North Carolina where the Cherokee language is taught.

New environmental regs, coal a tourism draw in southern W.Va, an historic clock in downtown Lexington Ky. restored and Big Stone Gap Va. gets a taste of Hollywood.

WVU Professor on EPA Regulations: With the proposed regulations targeting new coal-fired power plants, one West Virginia University law professor is predicting new challenges for the region’s coal industry.

EarthEcho President Philippe Cousteau discusses the health of a trout fishing stream in Grant County W.Va. with Jenny Newland, Canaan Valley Institute executive director, for a documentary about the Chesapeake Bay watershed.
EarthEcho International / State of WV

Federal Budget Cuts, EarthEcho education project and black lung roundtable

EarthEcho - West Virginia will be one of the states featured in a new education project created by EarthEcho International that focuses on in the Chesapeake Bay. EarthEcho is launching a new multi-year expedition program that will focus each year on an environmental problem.

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