Beth Vorhees

News Director, West Virginia Morning/News Host

Beth is the producer and host of West Virginia Morning heard every weekday morning at 7:30 on West Virginia Public Radio.  You also hear her deliver the news throughout the morning on Morning Edition.

When the state legislature is in its 60 day regular session, Beth is the producer of The Legislature Today West Virginia Public Broadcasting's nightly news program.

Beth is the Director of News and Public Affairs at West Virginia Public Broadcasting, leading an 8 person news team with bureaus across the state. 

Beth received the Lifetime Achievement Award in 2013 from the West Virginia Associated Press Broadcasters Association, just one of many awards she has received in her nearly 30 year broadcasting career at West Virginia Public Broadcasting.

Beth lives in Charleston and has been married to Rick Vorhees for 31 years.  They have one daughter, Diana of Nashville, TN.

Ways To Connect

On West Virginia Morning, our series “The Needle and the Damage Done” about heroin addiction continues with reports about treatment facilities in the state.  That’s on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting – telling West Virginia’s story.

On West Virginia Morning, our series “The Needle and the Damage Done” about heroin use and addiction continues. We’ll hear how the legislature made a bill providing a drug that counteracts an overdose available to more people a priority during this last session.  Also, a report on drug courts and how judges are dealing with minor drug offenders.  These stories on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting – telling West Virginia’s story.

  Coming up at 7:41 on West Virginia Morning, our series about the heroin epidemic “The Needle and the Damage Done” continues.  Today, reports about law enforcement officers feel about carrying and using a drug to reverse the effects of a drug overdose.  That’s coming up on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting – telling West Virginia’s story. 

On West Virginia Morning, “The Needle and the Damage Done: West Virginia’s Heroin Epidemic” begins this morning and continues this week. 

Today, Glynis Board reports about how the drug came to be so abused in the state and Beth Vorhees talks with a physician who has seen his share of opioid overdoses.

These stories on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting – telling West Virginia’s story.

Beth Vorhees / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Derek Harman practices family medicine in Logan County, but he's also been an emergency room physician. He got his medical degree in 2008 from the School of Osteopathic Medicine, in Lewisburg, and completed his residency in Virginia, in 2013.

 

Even at a young age, Harman has seen his fair share of overdoses.

Heroin is a respiratory depressant, and Harman said people who overdose can have shallow breath and a low number of breaths.

Courtesy Davis & Elkins College

Dr. Richard Ekman, President of the Council of Independent Colleges will serve as speaker for the 106th Commencement at Davis & Elkins College on Saturday.

On West Virginia Morning, Ashton Marra reports that Governor Tomblin has asked the state board of education to study the viability of the Schools for the Deaf and Blind in Romney.  That story on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting – telling West Virginia’s story.


On West Virginia Morning, a report from Lewis County where most of those attending a meeting spoke against the proposed Mountain Valley natural gas pipeline.  And we’ll learn about Teach For America.  A new law allows recruits from that organization to teach in the state’s classrooms.  These stories on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting – telling West Virginia’s story.


Shay Maunz / West Virginia Focus

During the 2015 Legislative session lawmakers approved, and Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin signed, a bill allowing alternative training methods for teachers who head West Virginia classrooms.

While the bill sets forth specific requirements for those teachers, like having a bachelor's degree and setting up a work agreement with the county school system, what it essentially does is allow the controversial program Teach for America to operate in the state.

On West Virginia Morning, Glynis Board talks with Beth Vorhees about troubles at West Liberty University.  And Ashton Marra reports from White Sulphur Springs where billionaire Jim Justice announced he’s running for governor.  These stories on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting – telling West Virginia’s story.


On West Virginia Morning,  two stories from Romney in Hampshire County.  Ashton Marra reports from the schools for the deaf and blind about its future.  And Jesse Wright reports on a groundbreaking ceremony for a new home designed for a severely wounded veteran.  These stories on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting – telling West Virginia’s story.


On West Virginia Morning, a report about old, abandoned coal mines and what the future holds to clean them up.  And The Earls of Lester perform the Mountain Stage song of the week on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting – telling West Virginia’s story.


On West Virginia Morning, 45 years ago a young student at West Virginia University took his black and white camera to demonstrations on campus after the shootings at Kent State.  Dan Ringer tells his compelling story for the first time.  And Beth Vorhees talks with Antiques Roadshow producer Marsha Bemko.  The episodes that were taped in Charleston last summer begin airing on Monday on PBS.  These stories on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting – telling West Virginia’s story.


On West Virginia Morning, Attorney General Patrick Morrisey appeared before Congress yesterday to say the EPA’s clean power plan is illegal.  And Jesse Wright has the story about how service dogs can help veterans dealing with PTSD.  These stories on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting – telling West Virginia’s story.


Gov. Tomblin
Office of the Governor

Governor Tomblin says anyone who wants to work can get a job.  Today, he noted the efforts of his workforce development council to make all West Virginians career ready.  

    Close to 60 percent of all the new jobs in West Virginia will require at least a two year college degree through the year 2018.  So the governor convened the first ever Governor's Workforce Summit at BridgeValley Community and Technical College in South Charleston to address it.  The governor said he took a little known seven member committee overseeing workforce needs in the state, to a bigger and more powerful council that includes higher education and community college chancellors, the superintendent of schools, the secretaries overseeing the Division of Rehabilitation and Commerce as well as the secretary of the Department of Health and Human Resources.  Tomblin says DHHR workers could counsel welfare recipients about becoming employed.

The governor suggested that DHHR counselors can suggest to their clients that there is a better life for them and their children if they got a job.  He noted that there is no longer the danger of losing medical insurance which kept many single mothers from becoming employed.
    The governor said all of these agencies are on the council so each is not working in a separate silo, but sharing information and resources.


On West Virginia Morning, Ashton Marra reports from a meeting about taxes and tax reform at the state capitol yesterday.  And Glynis Board introduces us to a photographer who takes pictures of Appalachia’s prehistoric remnants.  These stories on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting – telling West Virginia’s story.


On West Virginia Morning, we begin a year long look at the state’s roads, bridges, water resources, broadband accessibility in a series called “Bridging the Gap: A Deeper Look into West Virginia’s Infrastructure.  Today, Ashton Marra reports from Boone County about a water project.  That’s on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting – telling West Virginia’s story.


On West Virginia Morning, we continue our occasional series “Effective From Passage” with the inside story about how lobbyists worked to pass a bill dealing with insurance co-pays for cancer treatments.  And Eric Bibb performs the Mountain Stage Song of the Week.  That’s on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting – telling West Virginia’s story.


On West Virginia Morning, we re-visit the PBS documentary series “Cancer: The Emperor of All Maladies.”  Nancy Tonkin of Charleston was featured in a segment taped at the Charleston Area Medical Center.  Tonkin shares her diagnosis with us and how she came to be in the PBS program.  That story on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting – telling West Virginia’s story.


On West Virginia Morning, in the continuing series on the future of coal, a report about what’s next for coal miners.  That story on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting – telling West Virginia’s story.


Pages