Beth Vorhees

News Director, West Virginia Morning/News Host

Beth is the producer and host of West Virginia Morning heard every weekday morning at 7:30 on West Virginia Public Radio.  You also hear her deliver the news throughout the morning on Morning Edition.

When the state legislature is in its 60 day regular session, Beth is the producer of The Legislature Today West Virginia Public Broadcasting's nightly news program.

Beth is the Director of News and Public Affairs at West Virginia Public Broadcasting, leading an 8 person news team with bureaus across the state. 

Beth received the Lifetime Achievement Award in 2013 from the West Virginia Associated Press Broadcasters Association, just one of many awards she has received in her nearly 30 year broadcasting career at West Virginia Public Broadcasting.

Beth lives in Charleston and has been married to Rick Vorhees for 31 years.  They have one daughter, Diana of Nashville, TN.

Ways To Connect

On West Virginia Morning, Jessica Lilly talks with the Federal Co-Chair of the Appalachian Regional Commission about the region’s progress over the last 50 years.  And Jim Lange profiles jazz guitarist Ryan Kennedy who is releasing his first solo CD tonight.  Kennedy is a member of the Mountain Stage band. 

These stories on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting – telling West Virginia’s story.


On West Virginia Morning, West Virginia and West Virginia State universities are partnering with others to bring a presidential debate to Charleston in 2016. Ashton Marra has more about that.  And Clark Davis previews tonight's Sweet 16 matchup between the Mountaineers and the Kentucky Wildcats.  These stories on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting - telling West Virginia's story.


On West Virginia Morning, reports from two public meetings last night.  State officials talk with citizens about clean up plans for the Freedom Industries site in Charleston where a chemical spill occurred last year.  And in Bridgeport, citizens for and against the Atlantic Coast natural gas pipeline speak to federal officials.  These stories coming up on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting – telling West Virginia’s story.


On West Virginia Morning, we’ll have a report from a hearing conducted by U.S. Senator Shelley Moore Capito yesterday in Beckley about how the EPA’s emission control plan will affect southern West Virginia. 


On West Virginia Morning, Glynis Board reports on a congressional rewrite of the Toxic Substances Control Act.  The state’s two U.S. Senators are sponsors.  And we’ll travel to Pickens in Randolph County to visit with a maple syrup farmer.  These stories coming up on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting – telling West Virginia’s story.


On West Virginia Morning, reporter Roxy Todd concludes her series about prison inmates training therapy and service dogs.  Also, the Mountain Stage song of the week.  That’s West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting – telling West Virginia’s story.


On West Virginia Morning, Ashton Marra reports from the State Capital where lawmakers approved the state’s budget for fiscal year 2016.  And Roxy Todd continues her series about service and therapy dogs.  Today, we visit a prison where inmates train the dogs and how the dogs impact the prisoners who work with them. 

These stories on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting – telling West Virginia’s story.


On West Virginia Morning, the Heritage Farm and Museum in Huntington will become an affiliate of the famed Smithsonian Institution in Washington.  And we’ll go into a Charleston school and meet the service dog that helps children there.  These stories on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting – telling West Virginia’s story.


On West Virginia Morning, while lawmakers are working on the state’s spending plan, some Putnam County school children are getting a lesson in how to create and stick to a budget.  And two stories about how citizens can offer comments on air quality permits for natural gas drilling and a possible natural gas pipeline through the Jefferson National Forest.  These stories coming up on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting – telling West Virginia’s story.


On West Virginia Morning, Senate reporter Ashton Marra and House reporter Liz McCormick join host Beth Vorhees for an overview of the final day of the 1st Regular Session of the 82nd West Virginia Legislature.

  At the Legislature today, Senators begin to focus in on the state's four billion dollar budget as they wait for Delegates to approve some major pieces of legislation, like charter schools and campaign finance reform. The West Virginia schools for the deaf and blind will be eligible for funding from the School Building Authority for badly needed improvements under a bill passed by the senate finance committee today.

At midnight on Saturday, March 14, the West Virginia Legislature adjourned its 2015 session. This post is the home for The Legislature Today's online coverage of the final day of the regular session.

We've curated this post by aggregating tweets and posting audio of important moments on the chamber floors.

AP

House lawmakers have approved a push to scale back a law safeguarding against chemical spills from aboveground tanks.

A January 2014 chemical spill that contaminated drinking water for 300,000 residents for days spurred the law.

At the legislature today, the Commissioner of West Virginia’s Bureau of Public Health has concerns with a bill changing the way immunization exemptions are granted in the state. We’ll talk with Dr. Rahul Gupta.  And constitutional questions are debated in both chambers. In the Senate,  lawmakers take up a resolution calling for a national convention of the states. In the house, delegates debate second amendment gun rights.  The fireworks in both chambers tonight on The Legislature Today.

At the legislature today, the vote tally board in the house turns bright red as lawmakers vote against eliminating West Virginia’s Courtesy Patrol roadside assistance program.  Forest-grown ginseng is said to be as valuable as the wild grown roots and it could be a valuable industry for West Virginia as well.  And we’ll talk with U.S. Attorney Booth Goodwin about the benefits of the Opioid Antagonist Act to treat drug overdoses on The Legislature Today.

At the legislature today, the pros and cons of consuming raw milk is debated in the House.  Senate Bill 30 passed overwhelmingly and heads back to the Senate to consider House changes to the bill.  In the Senate there’s more discussion about funding for state roads and another agreement for more study about that issue.  And we begin a two part series about ginseng. Could it become a leading cash crop? These stories and more coming up on The Legislature Today.

At the legislature today, the House made some major changes to the senate’s campaign finance reform bill.  And two senators say the bill will not be approved by the Senate with those changes intact.  A rally over the weekend brings six thousand citizens to the capitol to speak out against the Republican-led initiatives they say will hurt workers across the state.  And we’ll talk about senior citizen’s issues with representatives of the AARP on The Legislature Today.

At the legislature today, the senate voted to override the governor’s veto of the Pain Capable Unborn Child Protection Act.  The law to restrict abortion after 22 weeks goes into effect in 90 days.  An informal joint session of the legislature was held in the house chamber today as emergency management officials briefed lawmakers about the impact of this week’s storms.  And we’ll review just how historic this legislative session is on The Legislature Today.

At the legislature today, after the Senate worked on the Charter Schools bill for weeks during the session, the bill is now in the hands of the house which has just nine days to consider it.  We’ll have an update.  And the number of damage claims against the state for potholes are rising. What one lawmaker says can be done about the condition of West Virginias roads.  These stories and more coming up on The Legislature Today.

At the legislature today, it’s crossover day which means members of both chambers have plenty of work to do. Senators say they will complete their calendar of bills long before the midnight deadline, But the House came to a halt this afternoon as members of the minority teamed up with some Republicans in an effort to kill a controversial bill, reading all 41 pages of it on the chamber floor. That story and we’ll talk with the leader of an education organization about the major bills lawmakers have considered so far this session, on The Legislature Today.

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