#TheStruggleToStay

Conclusion to Dave Hathaway's Struggle to Stay

Oct 2, 2017
Adobe Stock

After going for a year unemployed, Dave Hathaway was back underground, working at a new coal mine -- the Cumberland mine -- in Greene County, Pennsylvania. He didn’t want to have to go back underground, but no other job came close to paying him enough to support his family and be able to live in his hometown. 


Kara Lofton/ West Virginia Public Broadcasting

The Appalachian economy is changing. In this episode of Inside Appalachia, hear from people who are switching careers, including former coal miners who are learning computer programming and non-traditional students who’ve graduated from college. Meet the next person in our Struggle to Stay series, a mother of two named Crystal Snyder. She’s also switching careers.

Roxy Todd/ WVPB

This week we meet the next person we’ll be following in our Struggle to Stay series. 37-year-old Crystal Snyder is a single mother of two, who says she wants to stay in West Virginia, where her family has lived for several generations. But being a single mom in West Virginia is challenging for her, and sometimes she worries whether raising two kids in this state is good for their health. 

Kara Lofton/ West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Do people who identify as LGBTQ struggle for acceptance in Appalachia? In this week’s episode of Inside Appalachia, we explore how ideas about gender are changing across the country and in the region.

 

Still, some people, like 20-year-old Soleil-Dawe, who lives in Shepherdstown and identifies as gender queer, have found that coming out to their family isn’t easy.

 

Chris Oxley/ WVPB

This week on Inside Appalachia, we are revisiting some of the people whose lives were changed forever after the flooding of 2016. This episode was part of a TV special called A Year of Recovery. We hear about the hurt of losing loved ones and how flood victims are coping after the disaster. We hear why when a community goes through devastation together, they can come out stronger.

Katie Fallon

Summer is often a time for road trips, so we put together a few stories that made us think of summer break. And our Struggle to Stay series continues as we catch up with Mark Combs on his journey to find a home outside of West Virginia.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, we hear more from the West Virginia Legislature's special budget session as the Senate takes up it's version of a tax reform bill amid ongoing negotiations.

We'll also hear the final installment of Colt Brogan's Struggle to Stay story from Inside Appalachia producer Roxy Todd.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On the West Virginia Morning, we hear our fourth installment of Inside Appalachia's Struggle to Stay series. Producer Roxy Todd reveals more of the challenges that Colt Brogan faces in his struggle to stay in West Virginia.

We also hear more from our partnership with Wheeling Middle School and we feature another Mountain Stage song of the week.

22-year-old Takeiya Smith is a student at West Virginia State University, a historically black institution of higher education. Takeiya says over the past few years, as racial tensions have become more visible across the country, she’s become more vocal about the importance of racial justice, but she didn’t always like to speak up.  

While she was in middle and high school in Putnam county, Takeiya says she did experience racism, but she mostly kept quiet because she didn’t want to cause any trouble. In this interview, she talks about some of her experiences.

Can the West Virginia Legislature balance the state budget?

The constitution requires it, but that answer remains very much in doubt as we record this week's Front Porch Podcast.

A team of journalists from West Virginia Public Broadcasting have been selected to attend NPR’s first-ever Audio Storytelling Workshop.

The Audio Storytelling Workshop is where public media creators will bring their ideas to D.C. for three days of planning, training and collaborating.

WVPB’s project will focus on the economic crisis facing West Virginia and the decision by families here to stay or go. The team includes Roxy Todd (Reporter and Producer for Inside Appalachia), Glynis Board (Reporter) and Crystal Collins (Digital Editor/Producer).

It can be hard to live in West Virginia - especially now. Hear us discuss why we stay, despite the struggle.

Also, a retiring lawmaker recites a moving poem about living in flyover country, in response to a degrading tweet from Daily Show host Trevor Noah.