Charleston

April 6, 1938: Civilian Conservation Corps Establish Camp Kanawha

Apr 6, 2018
Wikimedia Commons / Andrew Springer

On April 6, 1938, the Civilian Conservation Corps established Camp Kanawha at the mouth of Shrewsbury Hollow, about seven miles south of Charleston. Over the next four years, CCC workers transformed the site, which had been heavily mined and timbered, into Kanawha State Forest.

March 29, 1973: Educator Fannie Cobb Carter Dies in Charleston

Mar 29, 2018
Educator Fannie Cobb Carter (1872-1973)
e-WV Encyclopedia / WV State Archives (WVSA)

African-American educator Fannie Cobb Carter died on March 29, 1973, six months after her 100th birthday.

She was born in Charleston in 1872, just months before the state’s new constitution prohibited black children and white children from attending school together.

After earning a teaching degree from Storer College in Harpers Ferry, Cobb returned home to teach in Kanawha County’s public schools. In 1908, she organized the teacher-training department at West Virginia Colored Institute, which is now West Virginia State University.

The Charleston Gazette-Mail logo.
Twitter

The new owner of the Charleston Gazette-Mail says the newspaper's vice president of circulation is being promoted to publisher.

HD Media announced Thursday that 64-year-old Jim Heady would take over the role on April 1.


UPDATE: Due to travel conditions Lee Ann Womack will be unable to appear as advertised on March 25. We hope to reschedule another date as soon as possible. This post was edited to reflect these changes Sunday morning March, 25.

The lineup for Sunday's Mountain Stage with Larry Groce is going to be an Americana honors class that embraces our diverse love of music here in Charleston, W.V.  We'll welcome James McMurtry, The Low Anthem, Inara George and John Moreland.

March 23, 1803: Pioneer Joseph Ruffner Dies in Charleston

Mar 23, 2018
Joseph Ruffner
Jan Smith Richardson

Pioneer Joseph Ruffner died in Charleston on March 23, 1803. Nine years earlier, the Shenandoah Valley native had purchased some 500 acres in Kanawha County from John Dickinson, including lands rich in salt deposits.

By the close of the 18th century, Ruffner had acquired much of present Charleston and had settled on what’s now the town’s East End.

March 14, 1974: Dr. I. E. Buff Dies at 65

Mar 14, 2018
Dr. I. E. Buff
University of Virginia Library

Dr. I. E. Buff died in Charleston on March 14, 1974, at age 65. Buff was the first physician to protest publicly that many coal miners’ deaths were inaccurately being labeled as heart attacks.

He argued that the coronaries were being caused by a widespread disease known commonly as black lung. He suggested that as many as half of West Virginia’s 40,000 miners suffered from black lung.

This Week in West Virginia History is a co-production of West Virginia Public Broadcasting and the West Virginia Humanities Council.
e-wv, The West Virginia Encyclopedia online. / e-WV

Author Fanny Kemble Johnson died in Charleston on February 15, 1950, at age 81.

Born in Rockbridge County, Virginia, in 1868, she moved to West Virginia in her late 20s and began her writing career. She and her husband, Vincent Costello, moved from Charleston to Wheeling in 1907, and back to Charleston in 1917.

February 2, 1895: Preacher Shirley Donnelly Born in Jackson County

Feb 2, 2018
This Week in West Virginia History.
e-wv, The West Virginia Encyclopedia online.

Preacher and historian Shirley Donnelly was born in Jackson County on February 2, 1895. When he was 14, he and his family moved from the village of Rock Castle to Charleston. After attending seminary in Richmond, he became an ordained Baptist minister.

Courtesey of the Artist

On Sunday, January 14 Larry Groce will welcome back John Oates to Mountain Stage as the show travels to Morgantown, WV to kick-off its historic 35th season of live performance radio.

Flickr / davidwilson1949

A United Nations expert on extreme poverty and human rights will visit West Virginia's capital city during a fact-finding trip to the United States.

e-wv, The West Virginia Encyclopedia / Michael Keller

Composer and performer Robert Drasnin was born in Charleston on November 17, 1927. His parents were Eastern European immigrants who met while working at a munitions factory in Nitro, about 15 miles west of Charleston.

When Drasnin was 10, his family moved to California. In high school, he played sax and clarinet in an all-star band that provided music for Hoagy Carmichael’s NBC radio show. He also performed with big band leaders Tommy Dorsey and Les Brown. His 1959 solo release, Voodoo, remains a classic of the “exotica” genre.

Opioids
Toby Talbot / AP Photo

Several West Virginia municipalities are suing The Joint Commission, claiming the Chicago-based health care accreditation group downplayed the dangers of prescription painkillers and helped fuel addictions.

The Charleston Gazette-Mail reports that the cities of Charleston, Huntington and Kenova and the town of Ceredo filed the class-action lawsuit Thursday in Charleston.

Steve Helber / AP Photo

The Trump administration announced Thursday it will hold a public hearing in West Virginia on its plan to nullify an Obama-era plan to limit planet-warming carbon emissions. The state is economically dependent on coal mining.

The Environmental Protection Agency will take comments on its proposed repeal of the Clean Power Plan in Charleston, the state capital, on Nov. 28 and 29.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, across the country, the tense relationship between African-American communities and police officers has become a focus throughout social and news media spheres.

On the latest episode from West Virginia Public Broadcasting’s Us and Them podcast, host Trey Kay reports on an effort to resolve the tension between police and a black community in Charleston, by bringing that tension out into the open.

In 1958, voters sent Byrd to the U.S. Senate, where he would remain from 1959 until his death in 2010 at age 92.
e-wv, The West Virginia Encyclopedia online. / Sen. Robert C. Byrd, US Senate, 1964 Civil Rights Act, Senate Appropriations Committee

Author and former speechwriter for West Virginia's late U.S. Sen. Robert Byrd plans to discuss the myths and reality of the influential Senate leader next Thursday in Charleston.

David Corbin, who worked for Byrd for 16 years and another decade for other Senate leaders, wrote "The Last Great Senator: Robert C. Byrd's Encounters with Eleven U.S. Presidents".

Courtesey of the Artist

On Sunday January 14 Mountain Stage with Larry Groce, the long running live performance radio program, will kick off its 35th season in Morgantown, WV at the WVU Creative Arts Center.

October 26, 1934: Basketball Star Rod Hundley Born in Charleston

Oct 26, 2017
Hot Rod Hundley
e-wv, The West Virginia Encyclopedia / West Virginia & Regional History Collection

Basketball star Rod Hundley was born in Charleston on October 26, 1934. He was a sensation at Charleston High School, dazzling opponents with his tricks and talent. His flashy style is rarely seen today, outside of the Harlem Globetrotters.

His repertoire included trick shots, a signature behind-the-back dribble, and spinning the ball on his finger—all during games. His flair on the court earned him the nickname the “clown prince of basketball.” But he’ll always be remembered as “Hot Rod.”

American Friends Service Committee South Region

High-profile confrontations between African-Americans and police officers have fueled tensions across the country. West Virginia is NOT a place where people are comfortable talking about these things.

But in Trey's hometown of Charleston, some of the key players are now bringing this tension out into the open.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Trey Kay, host of West Virginia Public Broadcasting’s Us & Them podcast, has been working on a series of reports focusing on Charleston’s West Side. His most recent installment explores a new program that awards grants to Charleston Police officers willing to purchase and rehab dilapidated West Side homes, and live there. On this West Virginia Morning, we hear an excerpt from the podcast episode titled “A Policeman is a Person in Your Neighborhood.”


Trey Kay

Two rivers run through Charleston, West Virginia. While most of the city is situated on the Kanawha, it’s the Elk River that demarcates the West Side from the governmental and business center of Charleston. Today, the West Side is the poorest neighborhood in Charleston.

Staff Sgt. Tony R. Tolley / U.S. Air Force

The West Virginia Air National Guard's 130th Airlift Wing has sent a transport plane and crew from Charleston to support relief efforts in storm-damaged Puerto Rico.

According to the Air National Guard, the C-130 Hercules plane is transporting equipment from New York to Georgia before departing for the Caribbean island on Thursday.

Charleston
Edsel Little / Flickr

BB&T has announced it is cutting 56 jobs from its processing service center in West Virginia's capital city.

The Charleston Gazette-Mail reports the financial services company announced on Tuesday the layoffs will come from a company center in Charleston that focuses on operations such as the processing of loans, credit cards and mortgages.

Kenneth King Collection, West Virginia State Archives

The "Us & Them" podcast is about seeing the same story two ways… and nothing calls out for that treatment more than coal in West Virginia.

Joni Deutsch

In most schools, you're likely to find yourself labeled as a jock, theater geek, stoner or even a loner.

But at my alma mater in West Virginia, we had a unique "Us & Them" sorting classification: you were either a “hiller” or a “creeker.”

Greg Goebel / commons.wikimedia.org

Federal funding has been awarded to two airport authorities in West Virginia. U.S. Sen. Shelley Moore Capito and Joe Manchin made the announcement Friday.

Over $730,000 will be awarded to the Mingo County Airport Authority in Williamson and to the Central West Virginia Regional Airport Authority in Charleston.

e-wv, The West Virginia Encyclopedia

On August 11, 1958, the Congress of Racial Equality—or CORE—launched a sit-in movement at several Charleston lunch counters. Prior to this time, African-Americans in Charleston could order takeout food at many white-owned diners but were not allowed to sit down and eat.

e-wv, The West Virginia Encyclopedia

In a referendum on August 7, 1877, West Virginia voters chose Charleston to be the permanent state capital. The capital’s location had become a running joke, as government records had been moved from Wheeling to Charleston and then back to Wheeling again, all in 14 years.The capital was on the move so much on West Virginia riverboats, it earned the nickname of “the floating capital.”

Kanawha River
Acroterion / wikimedia commons

The Environmental Protection Agency has announced an agreement to address dioxin contamination in the Kanawha River by constructing a cap over nine acres of sediment containing the toxic substance.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On the West Virginia Morning, in 2016, about 15 thousand people were killed by gun violence in the U.S. About 3 thousand teenagers were either injured or killed. In Charleston, West Virginia, there were 11 murders in 2016 -- eight of them occurred on the West Side of town and many of them were teens.

Historian and Businessman J.P. Hale
E-WV / WV Humanities Council

Historian, physician, and businessman John P. Hale died on July 11, 1902, at age 78. The great-grandson of the legendary Mary Draper Ingles, Hale was born in present Virginia before moving to the Kanawha Valley in 1840.

He earned a medical degree but decided that medicine wasn’t as lucrative as the booming salt business. By 1860, his salt works, located between Charleston and Malden, was possibly the largest in North America.

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