Arts & Culture

MSV photo by Ron Blunt.

Janice Summers-Young is one of two West Virginian artists who were selected for a new exhibit at The Museum of the Shenandoah Valley in Winchester, Virginia. The exhibit, called Second Time Around: The Hubcap as Art, features 287 artists from 36 different countries and opened yesterday.

This week, "A Change of Tune" host Joni Deutsch interviews Bahamas, the pseudonym for singer-songwriter Afie Jurvanen. Although Bahamas is far from being Bahamian (hint: Jurvanen hails from the non-Caribbean lands of Canada), his effortlessly beautiful folk will make you believe you're surrounded by sun and sand.

In Virginia, ordinary citizens are being specially trained to monitor water quality.

We remember Brother Claude Ely, known as the Gospel Ranger.

And in West Virginia, what was it like to grow up in a federal prison camp?  Ed and Agnes Friel’s parents were corrections officers there.

aqff.org

The Appalachian Queer Film Festival will host showings of the documentary “The Campaign, in Charleston Friday and Huntington Monday.

As a kickoff to their Film Festival in late October in Lewisburg, The Appalachian Queer Film Festival will host a showing of “The Campaign,” along with the Kanawha Players Theater. “The Campaign” which was filmed over a four-year period, examines the fight to defend same-sex marriage against Proposition 8 in California. Tim Ward is the Founder and Director of the AQFF.

Brian Blauser / Mountain Stage

 

Longstanding Mountain Stage alums Justin Townes Earle and Loudon Wainwright III are releasing new records this week, so it only seems right to open up the Mountain Stage archives to reminisce over their past performances with the help of “Mountain Stage After Midnight." Broadcast from 1am-5am Saturday and Sunday mornings here on West Virginia Public Radio, "Mountain Stage After Midnight" takes the best episodes from the show's 31 year history and shares their memories and songs with our late-night listeners. Each week we'll hand-pick two of our favorite episodes and they'll alternate order each night.

Roxy Todd

Composer and Huntington native Nate May recently finished production on an original two-person music-drama, called Dust in the Bottomland.

Ghostbusters / via Facebook

This Labor Day weekend Ghostbusters was re-released in theaters to celebrate the film’s 30th anniversary. This occurrence seems monumental for me, personally, for a few reasons.

Let me explain.

Ghostbusters was originally released to American audiences on June 8, 1984. My twin brother Dan and I were born on October 24, 1984.

I’m not good at math or reading a calendar on some days, but this fact means Dan and I were still occupying our mother’s womb when the film was released. That also means Dan and I turn 30 in less than two months.

Hillary Wilson

This week, "A Change of Tune" host Joni Deutsch interviews Petersburg-native Kenny Tompkins about New God, Tompkins' Baltimore-based art pop band that includes his very own brother, Curt Tompkins. The interview veers into topics as diverse as New God's music, the future of youth in West Virginia, and the confusion over the band's name and a popular Kanye West song. If you're a fan of music that invokes the breezy, lo-fi catchiness of The Beach Boys, this interview and band are recommended for you.

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Southwestern Pennsylvania’s famous Frank Lloyd Wright home Fallingwater will be featured in a new PBS program called 10 Homes That Changed America. The crew out of Chicago started production there last week.


West Virginia University

The state’s two Division 1 football programs kick off their seasons on the road Saturday afternoon.

Both Marshall and WVU kickoff at 3:30. Marshall is headed to Oxford, Ohio to take on the Miami University Red Hawks. The Mountaineers have a slightly tougher challenge Saturday as they travel to Atlanta for a matchup with Alabama, the team ranked number two in both the USA Today and Associated Press Preseason Polls.

WVU head coach Dana Holgorsen knows it will be a challenge.

Thirty West Virginians were killed as a result of domestic violence in just a year’s time during the last reporting period, between October 2012 and September 2013. It’s situation that Wyoming County native Christy Salters Martin is all too familiar with.

The six-time World Boxing Council Champion found herself fighting for her life after her former husband and manager tried to kill her. The former boxer is now sharing her story with the hopes of helping other victims.


Staging the Auction to Sell the Collection of a Lifetime

Aug 26, 2014
Frances Yeend and James Benner at the piano
West Virginia and Regional History Center

More than fifty years of marriage… plus two international performing careers… plus a shared passion for seeking out eclectic and interesting objects… adds up to one remarkable collection. World-famous opera singer Frances Yeend  and her husband amassed just such a collection. It’ll be auctioned off starting this weekend at the Sagebrush Roundup near Fairmont.

The city of Huntington is developing a new downtown skateboard park.

It’s been idea that’s been in the works for quite a while. Or better yet, a dream that skateboarders thought they’d never see realized. At a reception yesterday in Huntington, officials broke ground on a skateboard park that is just the beginning for skaters. Charles Holley is the executive director of the city’s department of development and planning.

Dan Schultz

By Dan Schultz and Traveling 219.

It’s Saturday night and the dance floor of the American Heritage Music Hall is crowded with couples swinging, stepping, and shaking to live country and rock ‘n’ roll music.

The music hall is spacious and makes a perfect venue for live music. Its walls are strewn with banjos, guitars, and photographs of early country music stars.

Pricketts Fort Forges New Connections By Teaching Old Skills

Aug 21, 2014
Ed Harris and Jim Mays pay close attention as Greg Bray demonstrates blacksmithing techniques.
Sarah Lowther Hensley

The blacksmith is one of the most enduring figures from the early days of American history. The art form calls to mind strength, ingenuity and craftsmanship…fire, iron and sweat. But in the age of technology and 3-D printers, what’s to become of this time-tested trade? One West Virginia state park is taking steps to forge new interest in traditional arts.

  This week, "A Change of Tune" host Joni Deutsch interviews Alex Hwang (vocals, acoustic guitar) of indie folk group Run River North about the band's self-titled debut. The discussion also veers into the Korean-American band's connections to Honda, their definition of folk music, and how the group was influenced by, of all things, rap and hip-hop music. If you’re a fan of indie folk music with a twist, this interview is recommended for you.

Cecelia Mason / WV Public Radio

Wildflower photos are being sought for West Virginia's next "Roadsides in Bloom" calendar.

The state departments of Environmental Protection and Transportation are sponsoring the 12th annual West Virginia Operation Wildflower calendar photo contest. 

College Football doesn’t just happen in Huntington or Morgantown on fall Saturday’s in the state. It’s happening in the Mountain East Conference.

A faith based organization plans to develop land in West Virginia to create a youth camp. The New River Gorge Regional Development Authority made the announcement earlier this week.

Young Life, a non-denominational Christian organization, plans to build an adventure camp in Nicholas County close to Mt. Nebo.

The organization has 35 camps around the globe according to their website. In a release, Young Life’s state Director, Scott Berg, said it was the outdoor activities, and landscape that attracted the group to West Virginia.


  The National Park Service has completed a study of the Shepherdstown Battlefield and related resources.

Congress ordered the study to determine whether the Civil War battlefield should be added to the national park system. It could become an addition to either Harpers Ferry National Historical Park or Antietam National Battlefield in Maryland.

Tammy Stidham with the park service tells The Journal that the study looked at historical significance, natural resources and economic uses.

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