Arts & Culture

225 Years and Counting
11:18 am
Tue April 22, 2014

Happy Birthday Congress, The Underappreciated Branch

Ray Smock
Credit Robert C. Byrd Center for Legislative Studies

I have a confession to make. I love the United States Congress. I don’t recall hearing that from anyone else lately; although I do know there are others who could say the same thing. If you can trust the latest poll only 6 percent approve of the current Congress and I doubt most in that group would go so far as to profess love for the institution.

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Podcast
9:06 am
Tue April 22, 2014

Rural Healthcare and Technology, Hippie Homesteaders, and Ramps

West Virginia Morning on this Earth Day includes a report on healthcare in the state, considering some new technologies; also: Hippie Homesteaders and what they've brought to the state; and it's ramp season!

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Books
5:06 pm
Mon April 21, 2014

New Book Examines the Impact of 'Hippie Homesteaders'

Joe Chasnoff, 1975
Joe Chasnoff

They’re known as the hippie homesteaders. People who moved to West Virginia in the late 1960s and 1970s to live off of the land. Some considered themselves as hippies, but others just wanted to leave urban environments for rural America.

A new book by Carter Taylor Seaton, Hippie Homesteaders: Arts, Crafts, Music and Living on the Land in West Virginia, examines the impact these people had on West Virginia. 

 
 You can find out more about this book at this website.
 

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Essay
2:44 pm
Mon April 21, 2014

Happy and (For the Most Part) Healthy in Unhappy and Unhealthy West Virginia

Michael Blumenthal

For those of us who like to make up our own minds about who, what, and how we are, this is a strange country, where U.S. News and World Report, TIME Magazine and the Gallup Poll profess to know more about our human condition than we do ourselves.

According to those harbingers of happiness and taste, for example, I and my fellow West Virginias  are now served by (and, in my case, teach at) the nation's eighty-third best law school (up from ninety-ninth in a single year) and reside in its unhappiest, unhealthiest and most obese State.

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Rite of Passage
1:03 pm
Mon April 21, 2014

Spring Brings Flowers, Sunshine and Fond Memories for This Mom

Sarah Lowther Hensley

It’s spring and along with bunches of daffodils, robins, and ramp festivals, there is a feeling in the air of fresh starts and new beginnings.

After the winter we have had all I can say is “hallelujah!”

Ironically, though, it was a hint of autumn that made me think of new life this week.

As I drove by our elementary school, I noticed the sign in front heralding that the next day was “Kindergarten Registration Day.”

We are just about a year away from “High School Orientation”  but, boy, do I remember that earlier rite of passage.

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Radio
11:04 am
Mon April 21, 2014

In God We Trust: Finding The 'We'

University of Charleston news series special

What does the national motto, “In God We Trust,” mean to Americans today?

Dr. Daniel L. Anderson, Bishop Sandra Steiner Ball, James Haught, Imam Ehteshamul Haque, Monsignor P. Edward Sadie, and Rabbi Victor Urecki explore this topic with University of Charleston President Ed Welch in a panel discussion titled, “In God We Trust: Finding the ‘We.’”

The program will air at 2 pm Monday, April 21 on West Virginia Public Radio.

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Real Estate
10:18 am
Mon April 21, 2014

Demolitions Could Affect Beckley Historic District

Downtown Beckley
Credit Tim Kiser / wikimedia Commons

  State historians say a proposed demolition project could threaten uptown Beckley's historic district.

Dan Bickey has proposed demolishing three buildings that he owns and developing the space for metered parking.

Only one property is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as a contributing resource to the Beckley Courthouse Historic District. But State Historic Preservation Officer Susan M. Pearce tells The Register-Herald that demolishing the buildings would significantly alter the district's viewshed.

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Religious Community
9:53 am
Mon April 21, 2014

The Catholic Committee of Appalachia Develops Its Third Pastoral Letter

Michael Iafrate, center, walks with his daughter Hazel during a coal miner rally in Charleston, W. Va. Iafrate is a doctoral student of theology from Wheeling. He is a board member of the Catholic Committee of Appalachia and the chair of the pastoral committee. Iafrate will also be the lead author of the third pastoral letter, which will likely be published in 2015. (Photo courtesy Michael Iafrate)

A Wheeling native who is a doctoral student studying Liberation theology will be the lead author of a new Pastoral letter in the works.

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Paranormal Experiences
1:15 am
Fri April 18, 2014

W.Va. Ghost Story Archive Calls For Submissions

Haunted Farm House
Credit WVGhosts.com

WVGhosts.com is an archive of WV ghost stories, and they're looking for more submissions.

Jonathan Moore of Pax, W.Va. started collecting WV ghost stories nearly 15 years ago because, well, he kept hearing them.

“Neighbors would just be telling me about their stories, and stories within Pax and I decided to take those stories and gather more from other people around WV in order to develop an archive for WV, for other people to read and share their experiences,” said Moore.

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West Virginia Morning
8:03 am
Thu April 17, 2014

Lawmaker: Legislators are Ceding Power to Governor, The Mysterious Tradition of Salt Rising Bread

One state lawmaker says the balance of power in the state has been shifting toward the office of governor for decades as legislators slowly cede their powers to the office, and the tradition of salt rising bread in Appalachia is slowly being forgotten, but two Pennsylvania women are trying to change that. They're making sure people remember not just the history, but also the science behind the food.

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Appalahian Cuisine
10:30 pm
Wed April 16, 2014

Salt Rising Bread: An Appalachian Tradition of Longing and Wild Microbes

Salt Rising Bread, an enigmatic yeastless Appalachian soul food that inspires fond memories of grandmothers.
Credit Susan Brown and Jenny Bardwell

Salt Rising Bread is an Appalachian traditional bread made without yeast. It’s a baking custom that can be traced back to the 1800s. But not much has been documented about the bread or its history, so two women in Mt. Morris, Pa., began a quest to understand the hows and whys behind a tradition that seems to captivate anyone who catches wind of it. Bakers Jenny Bardwell and Susan Brown have been researching the bread for 20 years.

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Arts & Culture
1:41 pm
Wed April 16, 2014

Two W.Va.-based Boy Scouts Councils Plan Merger

Boy Scouts sit under pipe at 2012 Nation Jamboree at the Summit Bechtel Reserve near Mt. Hope, W.Va.
Credit Dave Mistich / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Two West Virginia-based Boy Scouts of America councils are planning to merge.
 

Members of the Huntington-based Tri-State Area Council and the Charleston-based Buckskin Council will vote on whether to approve the merger on May 29.
 
Tri-State Area Council serves parts of West Virginia, Ohio and Kentucky. Buckskin Council serves the majority of West Virginia, and parts of Virginia and Kentucky.
 

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Performing Arts
10:44 am
Wed April 16, 2014

Fairmont State University Student Wins National Poetry Award

Ian Williams is a national award winning poet. He's from Fairmont and is about to graduate from Fairmont State University.
Credit Ben Adducchio / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

April is Celebrating Poetry Month across the nation. West Virginia’s had a great many poets find success, including Irene McKinney, Linda Goodman, and Tom Andrews. But there’s a young man from Fairmont who’s now also making a name for himself in the field of poetry.

Ian Williams is a 21 year old college student at Fairmont State University. He studies English Education and he dreams of becoming a college professor at some point during his life. But before that, he’s finding success as a poet. Williams recently won a national Poetry Award, in the National Federation of State Poetry Societies College/University Level Poetry Competition. Ian was one of two first place winners. He says he first got interested in poetry as a high school student in Fairmont.

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Graffiti
9:31 am
Wed April 16, 2014

Racial Slur Found in Theater Owned by West Virginia State University

Credit West Virginia State University

A racial slur spray-painted inside the West Virginia State University Capital Center Theater is being investigated by federal authorities.
 
The Charleston Gazette reports that police received a report of the graffiti over the weekend. They forwarded the case to the FBI for investigation as a possible hate crime.
 

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West Virginia Morning
8:01 am
Wed April 16, 2014

Constituional Powers Questioned in W.Va., Young Fairmont Poet Wins National Award

After some controversial vetoes from Gov. Tomblin, lawmakers, academics and citizens a like arequestioning the balance of power in West Virginia's Constitution and a 21-year-old Fairmont native is making a name for himself on the national poetry scene.

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Community
11:55 am
Tue April 15, 2014

Groups Work to Restore Wheeling's Oldest Cemetery

Mount Wood Cemetery
Credit Glynis Board / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Work is underway to reset the headstones at Wheeling's oldest cemetery.
 
Most of the headstones at the city-owned Mount Wood Cemetery have fallen, either due to shifting land or vandalism. 

The Restore Mount Wood Cemetery project is being funded by donations to the Community Foundation for the Ohio Valley. Monument company Rock of Ages donated its time to reset four large obelisks.
 

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West Virginia Morning
8:00 am
Tue April 15, 2014

Preserving Cheat Canyon, Celebrating Shakespeare's 450th Birthday & A Man's Roots in W.Va. Slavery

Two national conservancy groups have announced plans to turn the Cheat Canyon into a nature preserve and wildlife management area. West Virginia University celebrates the 450 birthday of William Shakespeare with an adaptation of Henry IV and a Michigan man traces his ancestry back to Cabell County and back to a slave owner with whom he shares a name.

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Plans for Revival
7:00 am
Sun April 13, 2014

Jefferson County Mill Listed as One of Most Endangered Buildings in W.Va.

Fegans Mill in Jefferson County W.Va. is on the state's most endangered building list.
Rebecca Glover West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Feagans Mill in Jefferson County W.Va. was recently added to the state’s Endangered Historic Structures list.  The structures on the list are at risk of facing demolition and neglect. 

Feagans Mill, a historic structure composed mainly of gray stone and a brick creamery to its side, rests in the woods surrounded by sycamore and cedars.  Some of its federal-style windows are now boarded up while others with broken panes allow the foliage to grow inside the crevices.

The Story of Feagans Mill: Then and Now

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Inside Appalachia Podcast
7:00 am
Sat April 12, 2014

High Tech Deer Tracking, Tennessee Moonshine, Thoughts From Kentucky's Poet Laureate and More

Tracking deer through infrared technology.

Bluegrass Musician Ricky Scaggs talks about his book “Kentucky Traveler: My Life in Music.”

Kentucky Poet Laureate Frank X. Walker discusses his work as a writer and activist.

Meet the first Future Farmers of America national office holder from West Virginia in 40 years.

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Children
6:56 pm
Mon April 7, 2014

"My Bike" Program Comes to West Virginia

Isabella goes on the bike parade with Sen. Joe Manchin.
Credit Ben Adducchio / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

For young children with certain disabilities, it’s just about impossible to ride a conventional bicycle. So a children’s charity known as Variety, which began in Pittsburgh in 1928, along with several people who wanted to get involved, started a program called the “My Bike” program. It provides specialized bicycles, that are built to suit the special needs of the child.

Nearly 30 children received these specialized bikes at a recent ceremony in Morgantown with Variety.

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