Arts & Culture

Rebecca Barray / https://www.flickr.com/photos/rebeccabarray/

The West Virginia Marble Festival is moving to the home of the state's last remaining marble factory.

The annual festival has been held in Cairo for 20 years. Media outlets report that the festival will move to Paden City, home of Marble King, in 2016.

 

Catherine Moore

If you live in Appalachia, you know that one of the most sensitive topics to talk about can be coal. In this episode of "Inside Appalachia," we'll hear liberal and conservative points of view, as we take on the complicated subject of the future of coal.

Brian Blauser/Mountain Stage

Cinco de Mayo is all about the food, the dance and the music. If you promise to bring the chips and dip, this weekend's Mountain Stage After Midnight will supply the music and dance from boundary-pushing Mexo-Americana bands like David Wax Museum, Quetzal and Son de Madera.

On Friday, May 1, West Virginia Public Broadcasting debuts its new podcast, Us & Them. The program, hosted by Peabody Award-winner and Charleston native Trey Kay, seeks to explore the issues that create vast cultural divides. 

We spoke with Kay about the origins of the podcast, as well as the dialogue he hopes to create between people of widely different ideological beliefs.

wikimedia Commons / user: RogDel / Sarah Gerrity / Department of Energy

Students from two Monongalia County schools are representing West Virginia in the National Science Bowl.

The event will be held Friday through next Monday at the National 4-H Youth Conference Center in Chevy Chase, Maryland.

John Benson/ ibrn4381

West Virginia's spring turkey season begins Monday and location could be a factor in a hunter's success.

The Division of Natural Resources says 2013 brood reports indicate that the statewide number of turkeys killed could drop. But hunters in the western and central mountains could have a better season.

Steve Gullick

When you think of live records, usually you think of album stop-gaps, in-between releases that don't exactly add or subtract much from a band's sound. Not so for indie folk rock band Phosphorescent, whose newest release, Live at the Music Hall, definitely deserves a listen. We talked with band frontman/founder/CEO Matthew Houck about the band's name, its evolution over the years and even its inclusion in The Amazing Spider-Man 2 soundtrack.  

In this episode, we’re revisiting a show from the Inside Appalachia archives. Remember those Love Letters that the town of Thomas wrote for another small town back in February? Well, they were delivered. We’ll find out which town received those letters in this episode. We’ll also hear a love letter written to a famous racehorse named Zenyatta, a story about bald eagle mates who remained together till death, and other stories about our complicated love of Appalachia. 

wikimedia

Over 300 teens will be at the Capitol this weekend for a mock legislative session. Teenagers from all over the state who are part of the Youth Leadership Association: Youth in Government will travel to Charleston to hold a student led, mock legislative session for three days.

Brian Blauser/Mountain Stage

The Carolina Chocolate Drops are supporting frontwoman Rhiannon Giddens' solo debut. Ivan & Alyosha are about to release a new record. Lucinda Williams is even hitting the folk festival circuit with her roots-rock'n hits.

West Virginia University

To recognize the anniversary of the 1954 Supreme Court decision in Brown v. Board of Education, West Virginia University is holding a three-day tribute to pioneering African-American student athletes.

 

Brown v. Board was a watershed moment for civil rights in the U.S. The decision ruled that segregation in schools violated the 14th Amendment of the Constitution, which protects citizens’ basic human rights.

e-wv, The West Virginia Encyclopedia / West Virginia Division of Culture and History

  Traditional musician Phoeba Cottrell Parsons was born in Calhoun County on April 21, 1908. When she was 10, she picked up her brother Noah’s banjo. She later recalled of that moment, ‘‘He didn’t want me to play because he was afraid I’d beat him.’’ She soon became accomplished not only at the banjo but also at singing ballads, telling stories and riddles, flatfoot dancing, and playing the fiddle sticks.

West Virginia Public Broadcasting

  Poet Irene McKinney was born in Belington in Barbour County on April 20, 1939. She earned degrees from West Virginia Wesleyan College and West Virginia University and, in 1976, published her first book of poems, The Girl with the Stone in Her Lap. She served as director of creative writing at West Virginia Wesleyan and, in 1984, published another poetry collection entitled The Wasps and the Blue Hexagon.  The next year, she won a poetry fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts and other prestigious honors.

Bud Carroll

Huntington rocker Bud Carroll has a lot of stories to tell.

For instance, did you know the song that opened his eyes to music came from Vanilla Ice? Or that his teenage guitar-playing impressed blues queen Koko Taylor? 

Zion Episcopal Church

Civil Rights activist Ruby Sales is coming to Charles Town Saturday to speak to the community and open up a dialogue on racism and injustice.

Richwood, W.Va.
Create W.Va.

An old lot in Richwood may soon become a park featuring trellises with solar panels.

BotMultichillT / wikimedia Commons

  

On the anniversary of the assassination of Abraham Lincoln, many don’t realize the many links between the 16th President and the Mountain State. 

Wendell Smith/Flickr

Here in Appalachia, it’s ramp season, and that means many small towns have their annual ramp feed to help raise money for their communities. This week we’ll travel to the Feast of the Ramson in Richwood, West Virginia, where we’ll meet 12-year-old ramp digger, Tyler McCune. And we’ll head to the Shenandoah Valley to hear a crowd of shape note singers. Although more and more people are leaving Appalachia, we will also hearing from some, like musician John Wyatt, who have returned home.

Mountain Stage

Get excited, 'cause West Virginia Public Broadcasting's spring pledge drive is happening this week! Since this station is our "Mountain Mama," we're pulling out all the stops to show you why West Virginia Public Broadcasting is "Almost Heaven" and deserves your pledge of support! That's why we're playing exclusive, archived shows from 1988 and 1989 on this weekend's Mountain Stage After Midnight.

Wikimedia Commons

Two Civil War battlefields in Maryland are ringing bells to mark the 150th anniversary of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee's surrender.
 
The Antietam National Battlefield near Sharpsburg and the Monocacy National Battlefield near Frederick are ringing bells for four minutes Thursday starting at 3:15 p.m. The four minutes symbolize the four years of the war.

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