Scott Finn

Executive Director and CEO

Scott Finn is executive director and CEO of West Virginia Public Broadcasting, an indispensable resource for education, news, public safety and economic development for West Virginia and all of Appalachia.

He describes himself as a "recovering reporter," serving stints as news director at WUSF in Tampa, news director and reporter for West Virginia Public Broadcasting, and statehouse reporter for the Charleston Gazette.

As a journalist, Finn received several national awards, including the Fred M. Hechinger Grand Prize for Distinguished Education Reporting from the Education Writers of America, two awards from Investigative Reporters and Editors, the Gerald Loeb Award for excellence in business reporting, and the Nancy Dickerson Whitehead Award for Excellence in Reporting on Drug and Alcohol Problems.

Finn served as a AmeriCorps-VISTA member in Big Ugly Creek, West Virginia (it's actually a small, beautiful place); founded and ran an AmeriCorps program called APPALREAD; and was a sixth grade social studies and English teacher.

He also was a really, really bad whitewater rafting guide.

Finn, his wife, Wendy, and children, Max and Iris, live in Charleston, West Virginia.

Ways to Connect

W.Va. Delegate Joshua Nelson, R-Boone, has launched a petition seeking to stop Syrian refugees from coming into America, at least until better safeguards are in place.

His experience serving in the military informed his decision, he said.

"Most people in that area just want to live peaceful lives. I've served with Middle Eastern people, Islamic people, that had my back," Nelson said

"But, in regards to what happened in Paris, these guys are posing as Syrian refugees. Until we are certain that (screening) process is adequate, we have to be very careful."

Wv Broadband Mapping Project

West Virginia has some of the lowest rates of broadband access at some of the slowest speeds in the nation.

Sen. Chris Walters, R-Putnam, wants state government to build a sort of fiber-optic interstate highway and then lease it to private providers. The goal is to bring high internet speeds at cheaper costs.

On The Front Porch podcast, Walters gave ten reasons for building the network:

Last week, The Front Porch focused on the issue of school consolidation, in light of the ongoing fight in Fayette County.

Many people took issue with the fact that we had no one from Fayette County on the show. So we're hoping to rectify that with this follow-up podcast.

Ohio River
YiFeiBot / wikimedia commons

Seven public media stations in Kentucky, Ohio and West Virginia, including West Virginia Public Broadcasting, have been awarded a $445,000 grant from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB) to establish a regional journalism collaboration.

Craig Cunningham / Charleston Gazette-Mail

As Fayette County fights over school consolidation, The Front Porch gang questions whether the promises made about school consolidation ever came true.*

Trans-Allegheny Lunatic Asylum, West Virginia Penitentiary,  Mothman...our region has a long list of haunts and haints.

David Grubb via Facebook


What impact will President Obama's new strategy have on the epidemic of prescription painkiller abuse and heroin use in West Virginia and Appalachia?

Jim Justice
Scott Halleran / Getty Images

West Virginia’s only billionaire, who just happens to be running for governor, owns companies that have millions in unpaid tax bills.

Fotolia DollarPhoto Club


West Virginia has the worst unemployment rate in the nation. Patriot Coal warned 2,000+ employees they might be losing their jobs.

What can West Virginia do to turn things around?

Find the entire episode of Us & Them here.

Filmmaker and journalist Roopa Gogineni usually covers civil wars in Africa. But when she saw Ferguson, Baltimore and the fight over the Confederate flag, she decided it was time to cover America's ongoing Civil War.

You may have heard about the scandal involving Volkswagen cheating on emissions standards. But did you know that WVU researchers helped catch VW in the act?

Rick Wilson

A deep love of their homeplace, resourcefulness, and deep faith - West Virginians and people in Gaza, the West Bank and Israel share a lot.

Midwives have a long and storied history in Appalachia. Can they help decrease the region’s high C-section rate?

Charleston Gazette-Mail

He’s been beaten and berated for doing his job, but despite the dangers, Bob Aaron says he still loves being a T.V. reporter.

West Virginia Public Broadcasting is proud to announce that in January 2016, The West Virginia Channel will be on the air.

West Virginia State University (WVSU) and West Virginia Public Broadcasting (WVPB) announce the creation of a one-year, paid media fellowship program called the West Virginia Media Diversity Fellowship.

Ten years ago, Jennifer Hill was trying to figure out how she, her mother and brother could survive Hurricane Katrina.

The ABC and Fox affiliates in the Charleston-Huntington market are no longer available on Dish Network.

WCHS and WVAH are owned by Sinclair Broadcasting, which did not reach an agreement with the satellite provider Dish Network. The stations were no longer available on Dish as of late Tuesday evening.

153 Sinclair Broadcasting stations in 79 markets have been blacked out on Dish Network because they failed to reach a new, long-term deal on broadcast retransmission licensing.. 

Charleston Daily Mail

Can West Virginia comply with President Obama’s Clean Power Plan? And if so, at what cost?

Those are the questions Randy Huffman is trying to answer. Huffman is Secretary of the West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection.

Huffman came on “The Front Porch” podcast to talk about how his agency is dealing with Obama's plan to reduce greenhouse gases from power plants.

Here are 10 takeaways from our interview with Huffman that will (hopefully) help you understand the Clean Power Plan’s impact on West Virginia.

Bruce Gilden, Vice

"Two Days in Appalachia," the recent photo essay in Vice, has generated a social media firestorm for how it portrays folks in eastern Kentucky.

Did Vice send photographer Bruce Gilden to Appalachia to make us look like freaks? And how does this feed into existing stereotypes of people here?