Cecelia Mason

Eastern Panhandle Bureau Chief, Inside Appalachia Host

Cecelia Mason is West Virginia Public Broadcasting’s Eastern Panhandle Bureau Chief. Cecelia has worked in the Shepherd University bureau since December 1990 covering a variety of stories throughout the Eastern Panhandle and in Washington D.C. She can also be heard hosting Inside Appalachia.

Cecelia is a native West Virginian. She grew up in Fairmont where she graduated from Fairmont Senior High School and attended Fairmont State College for two years before transferring to Western Kentucky University where she received a Bachelor of Science degree in Journalism and Political Science.

Before joining West Virginia Public Broadcasting Cecelia worked in news departments at commercial radio stations in Bowling Green, Ky., Chattanooga, Tn., Knoxville, Tn., Wichita Falls, Tx., and Charles Town, W.Va. She also worked more than three years for a commercial television station in Lawton, Ok.

When she’s not covering news Cecelia teaches a news practicum class for Shepherd University’s Communications Department.

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Edible Mosaic
1:43 am
Tue July 22, 2014

Shepherdstown Bakery Makes Treats For U.S. Capitol Event

Credit Cecelia Mason / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Those attending the screening at the United States Capitol Tuesday evening will not only learn more about West Virginia, but will be able to sample some of its culinary treats. On Monday the Shepherdstown Sweet Shop Bakery was assembling this edible mosaic of the West Virginia state seal for the event. Owner Pam Berry said each square in the design was attached to the top of a chocolate brownie piece, making about 370 petit fours, or bite size treats.

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Scientific Research
12:07 am
Sun July 13, 2014

How Will Brook Trout Respond To Climate Change?

Scientist Than Hitt is researching how brook trout might respond to climate change in this lab in Leetown, West Virginia.
Credit Cecelia Mason / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

As the climate changes, scientists around the world are trying to figure out how plants, animals and even people will be affected. One scientist in West Virginia is conducting an experiment to find out how well a fish native to Appalachian streams might survive.

This audio is pending

Biologist Than Hitt works at the U.S. Geological Survey Leetown Science Center in Jefferson County, West Virginia, where scientists explore everything from declining fish and mussel populations to the increasing presence of intersex fish in the nation’s waterways. Hitt has just started a new research project: trying to determine how climate change might affect the brook trout.

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Inside Appalachia Podcast
12:06 am
Sat July 12, 2014

How Mountaintop Removal Affects Fish, Tourism Along the Clinch River, An Appalachian Opera and More

Research shows mountaintop removal mining does impact fish populations.

Southwestern Virginia is trying to boost its economy using culture and nature.

Appalachian food is the topic of a summit in Kentucky.

And a new play delves into the issue of sexual assault in the military.

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Theater Festival
4:41 pm
Thu July 10, 2014

Contemporary Plays Take the Stage in Shepherdstown, W.Va.

Kaliswa Brewster as "Alicia G." in One Night by Charles Fuller.
Credit Seth Freeman / Contemporary American Theater Festival

Starting this weekend in Shepherdstown, West Virginia, theater lovers will be able to explore such topics of the day as: how the country treats its veterans, artificial intelligence and the ethics of assisted suicide.

The line up for the 24th season of the Contemporary American Theater Festival at
Shepherd University features a play by Pulitzer Prize winning playwright Charles Fuller that focuses on sexual assault in the U.S. military.

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Science
10:16 am
Wed July 9, 2014

USGS Study: Mountaintop Removal Mining Impacts Fish Populations

This creek chub (Semotilus atromaculatus) collected by Than Hitt and Doug Chambers downstream from MTM operations shows classic signs of selenium toxicity (spinal abnormality).
Credit Submitted Photo / U.S. Geological Survey

Mountaintop removal mining does have an effect on fish populations downstream from the mining operations, according to a study just released by the U.S. Geological Survey.

The study title is a mouthful: Temporal changes in taxonomic and functional diversity of fish assemblages downstream from mountaintop mining, which is the fancy way of saying USGS scientists looked at how well fish populations are doing in streams down river from mountaintop mining sites.

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The Appalachian Project
11:09 pm
Sun July 6, 2014

These Two Friends Want to Document and Preserve Appalachian Culture

The Appalachian Project is collecting stories through its Facebook page as well as through video taped interviews.
Credit West Virginia Public Broadcasting

The Appalachian region has been reported on, documented and studied quite a bit in the past 50 years since President Lyndon Johnson came to the region to declare a ‘war on poverty.’

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Inside Appalachia Podcast
6:00 am
Sat July 5, 2014

Documenting Appalachian Culture, The Meaning of Wheeling, A Special Soldier and More

Two regular guys take on the job of documenting Appalachia’s culture and history.

A new book explores the meaning behind the name Wheeling.

Looking at Appalachia is still looking for photographs of the region.

And a West Virginia soldier is honored to be a member of the Old Guard.

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Summer Meals
11:49 pm
Tue July 1, 2014

Free Lunch Available to Jefferson County Children

John Unger
Credit West Virginia Legislature

During the school year children are guaranteed at least one full meal a day, something that goes away during the summer months. Three churches in Jefferson County are teaming up with other organizations to offer lunch to children.

St. John Lutheran Church and St. John's Episcopal Church in Harpers Ferry and Bolivar United Methodist Church in Bolivar are teaming up with the Jefferson County Council on Aging to provide summer lunches and activities for children.

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Higher Power
5:27 pm
Mon June 30, 2014

Power Companies Ask for Rate Increase

Credit American Electric Power

Customers of American Electric Power in West Virginia would pay more for electricity if the power company’s request for a rate increase is granted.

Appalachian Power and Wheeling Power filed a request Monday with the West Virginia Public Service Commission for a $226 million revenue increase. Both are subsidiaries of AEP, which says in a news release that if approved, West Virginia customers would see a 17 percent increase in electric rates depending on usage and how they’re classified.

The company said in a news release the rate increase is needed for several reasons:

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Gubernatorial Appointments
5:07 pm
Mon June 30, 2014

W.Va. School Building Authority Gets New Leader and Members

There will be some new faces at the next quarterly meeting of the West Virginia School Building Authority. Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin has appointed a new executive director and five new members to the SBA.

Tomblin announced Monday that David Sneed will serve as executive director. According to a news release from the Governor’s office, Sneed was the Chief of Architectural Services for the School Building Authority from 1990 until 2012. He has also served as director of school planning in Kanawha County and worked with a private company in educational project planning.

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Inside Appalachia Podcast
6:00 am
Sat June 28, 2014

A Former Coal Miner Promotes Green Energy, Synchonizing Fireflies, Memories of Frog Hunting and More

One Virginia man spreads the gospel of green.

There are fireflies in Pennsylvania that blink together.

More women are taking on the role of farmer.

A Tennessee writer has fond memories of hunting frogs.

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Climate Conference
12:43 am
Fri June 27, 2014

High School Students Encouraged to Take Action

Megan Cooper, Susie Marvin, Zach Shulkin and Jaried Buxton are attending the SC3 conference in Shepherdstown, West Virginia.
Credit Cecelia Mason / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

110 high school students from around the world are taking part in a week-long event in Shepherdstown, West Virginia, that encourages them to develop conservation leadership skills.

The Student Climate Conference, which is called SC3 for short, brings together students representing 30 states and nine countries, including Brazil, France and Somalia, asks the question: How are we as global citizens going to bring back and contribute to our schools and communities?

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Agriculture Study
9:03 pm
Mon June 23, 2014

How Well Will Hops Grow In West Virginia?

Matthew Grove waters a new hops garden on his farm in Berkeley County.
Credit Cecelia Mason / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Cecelia Mason reports about hops growing for West Virginia's beer industry.
One day you might be able to buy even more styles of 100 percent West Virginia-made beer. That is, if a current study shows the state is a good place to grow hops. 

Since the craft beer industry has taken off, West Virginia State University decided to study whether local farmers can benefit from the burgeoning beer industry by growing hops for the brewers to use.

West Virginia State extension agent Brad Cochran says the state agriculture department awarded a $23,000 grant for the project, which seem to be popular. He received 70 applications from folks wanting to participate.

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Inside Appalachia Podcast
7:00 am
Sat June 21, 2014

Heroin Problems, W.Va. African American History, Growing Hops and More

Heroin could be replacing prescription pills as Appalachia’s biggest drug problem.

West Virginia is 151 years old and we look at the African American contribution to its culsture.

Efforts are underway to encourage farmers across the region to grow hops to support the brewing industry.

And we visit with Bridget Lancaster from America’s Test Kitchen.

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Inside Appalachia Podcast
11:40 pm
Fri June 6, 2014

Reaction to Proposed EPA Regs, Making Lawns Healthier for Waterways, Growing Hemp in Ky. and More

Pennsylvania coal miners mull over the proposed new EPA carbon rules.

Solar Power is too expensive for many non-profits but a West Virginia organization is making it possible.

And, Kentucky farmers have new crop option- hemp.

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Solar Holler
11:35 pm
Wed June 4, 2014

New Organization Wants to Put Solar Panels on Non-Profit Buildings Across West Virginia

Dan Conant and Than Hitt stand in front of the Shepherdstown Presbyterian Church, which is slated to get solar panels later this summer.
Credit Cecelia Mason / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

The Shepherdstown Presbyterians meet in a circa-1836 brick building that sits just across the street from the town’s post office- about two blocks from the main street.

A few years ago the growing congregation put on an addition that houses modern meeting and gathering rooms. Soon, the roof of this addition will be topped with solar panels thanks to the newly formed nonprofit organization Solar Holler. 

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Inside Appalachia Podcast
6:00 am
Sat May 31, 2014

Opposition to New Black Lung Regs, A Kentucky Banjo Legend, Helping the Birds & Bees, and More

Efforts to combat black lung disease draw criticism.

Meet Kentucky banjo player Lee Sexton.

A look at efforts in Kentucky and Pennsylvania to save the birds and bees.

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Art Voice
9:00 am
Sun May 25, 2014

Morgan County Couple Wants You to Meet Local Artists

Jack Kelly and Marla Carr
Credit Cecelia Mason / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Many artists, crafts people and musicians have made Appalachia their home, contributing to the culture and economy. A Morgan County couple is working to document the local arts scene through an online video project called ArtVoiceWV.

Jack Kelly is a retired public television documentary filmmaker. He and his wife Marla Carr moved to Berkeley Springs a little over a year ago.

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Inside Appalachia Podcast
6:00 am
Sat May 24, 2014

A Futuristic Library, Re-enacting the Matewan Massacres, Documenting W.Va. Art and More

  A new school library in Wheeling, West Virginia, looks to the future.

Also in West Virginia town of Matewan revisits its violent history.

And an Appalachian couple gives us an inside look at artists and their work.

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Vote Results
4:56 pm
Wed May 21, 2014

Another Step Forward in Burwell Nomination

Sylvia Matthews Burwell
Credit Office/Sen. Jay Rockefeller

West Virginia native Sylvia Matthews Burwell's nomination to head the U.S. Department of Health and

Human Services took one more step forward Wednesday when the Senate Finance Committee approved her as Health and Human Services Secretary.

Burwell testified during a hearing before the committee on May 14, 2014, answering questions on topics like  the Affordable Care Act, Medicaid fraud and whether she'll be responsive to Senators when they have questions or concerns about HHS.

The committee approved the nomination by a vote of 21-3.

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