Emily Hilliard/ WV Folklife Program

Inside Appalachia's Broommaker Film Will Be Screened at Library of Congress

Eighty-seven year-old Jim Shaffer has had his hands busy since 1946. He is the last commercial broom-maker left in West Virginia. People from all over the country have come to see, and take home, some of Shaffer’s work. A short film about Jim Shaffer is being screened at the American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress later this month at an event called "Reel Folk: Cultural Explorations on Film" . The video was produced earlier this year by Inside Appalachia, in collaboration with the West Virginia Folklife Program . In this episode of Inside Appalachia, we listen back to Jim Shaffer's story. We'll hear other stories about Appalachian artisans and folklorists who say holding on to Appalachian traditions matter.

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West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, the hurricane season’s super-charged storms highlighted the importance of disaster planning, and it’s not just a concern for the coasts. Scientists warn that heavy rain events have become more common in the Ohio Valley. Glynis Board looks at how some flood-prone communities are preparing for what experts call “the new normal” of extreme weather.

Sept. 25, 1913 - The Greenbrier Resort Opens in White Sulphur Springs

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Greenbrier Resort
e-wv, The West Virginia Encyclopedia

On September 25, 1913, The Greenbrier resort opened in White Sulphur Springs. 

Tourists had visited the mineral springs at White Sulphur since the late 1700s. 

The waters were believed to have healing powers, and the cool mountain air lured the rich and powerful away from the sultry summers in Baltimore, Washington, D.C., and the South. Some of the prominent politicians who frequented White Sulphur included Henry Clay and Presidents Martin Van Buren and John Tyler. Robert E. Lee’s visits after the Civil War established White Sulphur as a mecca of the South. 

Courtesy CAMC

One of West Virginia's largest employers is expected to eliminate 300 jobs by the end of this year. Recently, the hospital announced how 40 of those jobs will be cut.

David Benbennick / Wikimedia commons

Federal officials say two explosions that killed three workers at a West Virginia industrial site earlier this year were likely caused by unintended chemical reactions.

As the nation has debated the GOP proposals to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, NPR member station reporters have been talking to people around the country about how the proposed changes in the health law would affect them.

Here are five of those stories:

photos by Kara Lofton, illustration by Jesse Wright

Harvey. Irma. Maria. The hurricane season’s super-charged storms have highlighted the importance of disaster planning, and the aftermath offers a fresh lesson in just how long and difficult recovery can be.

Communities in the Ohio Valley, some still recovering from flash floods themselves, are looking at ways to prepare for what emergency management professionals warn is an era of more frequent extreme weather. 

It’s time, experts say, to get ready for the new normal.

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 The University of Texas Anderson Children’s Cancer Hospital released a study this month showing that diet and exercise may improve the effectiveness of chemotherapy. Healthy eating is already encouraged during treatment but diet plans are uncommon. When it comes to physical activity, the study says, doctors are cautious when suggesting an exercise routine.

Reid Frazier/ The Allegheny Front

For the past few weeks, we’ve been following the story of Dave Hathaway, a laid off miner from Greene County, Pennsylvania, as part of our series The Struggle to Stay.

Late in 2016, he got a job offer for a company that was doing blasting work. It was great money, and a steady day shift. But it was in Maryland. He’d have to spend four nights a week in a hotel, leaving Ashley to take care of newborn Deacon. “We agreed I pretty much had to do it,” he said. “I didn’t have any funds coming in.”

Emily Hilliard/ WV Folklife Program

Eighty-seven year-old Jim Shaffer has had his hands busy since 1946. He is the last commercial broom-maker left in West Virginia. People from all over the country have come to see, and take home, some of Shaffer’s work.

A short film about Jim Shaffer is being screened at the American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress later this month at an event called "Reel Folk: Cultural Explorations on Film". The video was produced earlier this year by Inside Appalachia, in collaboration with the West Virginia Folklife Program

In this episode of Inside Appalachia, we listen back to Jim Shaffer's story. We'll hear other stories about Appalachian artisans and folklorists who say holding on to Appalachian traditions matter.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, geologic studies indicate West Virginia is the largest geothermal hotspot on the East Coast. So why don’t we hear more about it? Liz McCormick reports, some counties in West Virginia have been pushing the envelope for a future in geothermal energy use.

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New Voices, New Programs on WVPB

In response to our recent listener survey , West Virginia Public Broadcasting (WVPB) is excited to broadcast several new voices (and programs) on our statewide radio service , our live stream and our WVPB mobile app .

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Appalachia is bleeding population; the 2015 U.S. Census showed West Virginia was losing population faster than most other states. There’s a struggle to leave, and to stay.

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