Inside Appalachia Folkways Project

Chair Caning Provides Employment And Community For Folks With Visual Impairments In Wheeling, W.Va.

In 17th century Europe, caned chairs were all the rage. You know the kind — a wooden frame with a seat woven onto it. Nowadays though, you don’t see many caned chairs around. That's because cane doesn’t last forever. Eventually the material breaks down and needs to be replaced. Here at the Seeing Hand Association in Wheeling, West Virginia, folks are giving new life to these old chairs, and finding community along the way.

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Appalachian Artist Gets Her Mojo Back, Appalachian Woman Gets Her Unicorn Back

Here’s a story about a unicorn. Well, it’s really a story about an artist in Appalachia who lost her mojo. And it’s about the woman who helped her get her mojo back. With the help of the unicorn.

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Remembering Travis Stimeling, A WVU Professor, Scholar Of American Music, Musician And Friend 

In walked Travis Stimeling. Burly and ebullient, Stimeling grew up playing guitar in church as a child in Buckhannon, West Virginia, then went on to study trombone in college. That eventually led to a Ph.D. in musicology from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, and a teaching gig at Millikin University in Illinois.

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In North Carolina, Master Woodcarvers Nurture Century-Old Craft Tradition

On a foggy morning, Angela Wynn heads into the John C. Campbell Folk School in Brasstown, North Carolina. Normally, she’d be starting a day of work as a housekeeper here. But today, she’s at the school for a different reason. She’s here to learn how to cut out wood blanks from Richard Carter, a longtime Brasstown Carver.

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