Inside Appalachia

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On West Virginia Morning, we’ll hear again from 20 year old Colt Brogan of Lincoln County and hear more of his story on the struggle to stay.

That’s on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting – telling West Virginia’s story.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On West Virginia Morning, Becca Shimmel with the Ohio Valley Resource reports on the wage gap in the Ohio Valley and we hear from people who experience chronic pain and the stigma that comes with it.

These stories on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting - telling West Virginia's story.

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It’s been about 20 years since the opioid epidemic first exploded across Appalachia, and now doctors are shifting away from prescribing opioids for long-term pain. 

But this shift away from pills has met resistance from some  doctors and patients.

In this episode of Inside Appalachia, we'll hear why addiction hit Appalachia so hard. We'll also find out what the medical community is doing to fight the pain pill epidemic.

Roxy Todd

20-year-old Colt Brogan always found it easy to make fairly good grades in school. As a kid, he’d dreamed of being an architect. But that changed. Around the time when he was a junior in high school, Colt decided college wasn’t for him.

“It felt too unpredictable. I thought, dealing drugs is safer than going to college. That’s the God’s honest truth,” says Colt.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On West Virginia Morning, we’ll hear the first in our series “The Struggle to Stay” with a profile of a young Lincoln County man and learn his story about choosing to stay home and make his living here.

That’s on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting – telling West Virginia’s story.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On West Virginia Morning, host Beth Vorhees talks with producer Roxy Todd about the upcoming series of reports called “The Struggle to Stay” which profiles West Virginians who are considering whether to stay here or leave and Judith Owen is along with our Mountain Stage song of the week.

That’s on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting – telling West Virginia’s story.

Emily Hilliard/ WV Folklife Program

Along Davis Creek, in Loudendale, WV, outside of Charleston, there’s a long green building on the side of the road with the words “Charleston Broom and Mop Co.” painted on the side. That building is the workshop of James Shaffer, who at age 87, is the last hand-made commercial broom maker in the state. He first learned the trade in 1946, meaning he’s been making brooms for 70 years.

Jessica Lilly

Coal mining has touched so many aspects of life in Appalachia. The coal industry has provided more than just jobs — it’s helped build towns, bridges and it’s even provided money for many Appalachians to go to college. We also have a deep cultural connection to coal and its history.

Still, there’s no denying the coal industry has changed the landscape of our mountains, and infected many miners with a deadly disease known as black lung.

Emily Hilliard/ WV Folklife Program

In this episode of Inside Appalachia, we take a road trip to explore stories of people who are reviving Appalachian traditions, like baking salt rising bread or making sorghum sweeteners.

Some folklorists, artists and educators are wondering what the future of traditional arts in the country will look like. On Friday, the West Virginia House of Delegates approved a bill that would eliminate the state's Secretary of Education and the Arts and reorganize several of the departments the position oversees. Most of those departments oversee cultural and arts programs like the state archives, the state museum, the annual Vandalia music gathering and West Virginia Public Broadcasting. The bill still needs to be approved by the state Senate to take effect.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, we travel to Loudendale, West Virginia, where James Shaffer has been making brooms by hand for more than 70 years. He says the business has changed.
And we hear Andrew Bird play "Pulaski at Night," on this week’s Mountain Stage song of the week.

Jessica Lilly and Roxy Todd, two of West Virginia Public Broadcasting’s award-winning reporters, will be keynote speakers at The ENGAGE Conference of Leadership for Change.   The conference will be held on Saturday, March 25, at West Virginia Wesleyan College in Buckhannon, WV.

Jessica and Roxy have won numerous awards for their journalism and storytelling.  In particular, one 2015 episode called "Inside Appalachia: When Strangers Take Our Picture", won the best Documentary from the Regional Associated Press, and a Murrow award for best documentary.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On West Virginia Morning, we’ll check in with Dave Mistich, the editor of our digital journalism project “100 Days in Appalachia” and Johnny Staats and Robert Shafer has our Mountain Stage song of the week.

That’s on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting – telling West Virginia’s story.

Not many Americans know the story of the Mine Wars that were fought between workers, labor unions and mine company guards during the early 1900s. In this show, Jessica Lilly talks with filmmaker Randy MacLowry, whose new PBS documentary The Mine Wars focuses on these armed uprisings by labor organizers in the coalfields of southern West Virginia.

Roxy Todd/ WVPB

This week on Inside Appalachia, we’ll travel to Sugar Bottom Farm in Clay County West Virginia to meet Veteran Eric Grandon, the first veteran to go through the Veterans and Warriors to Agriculture program.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On West Virginia Morning, Governor Jim Justice took his Save Our State tour to Fairmont State University yesterday.  Anne Li will have the story and Iron and Wine has our Mountain Stage song of the week.

That’s on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting – telling West Virginia’s story.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On West Virginia Morning, some residents in Wheeling debate whether the city should protect unauthorized immigrants as a sanctuary city and reporter Anne Li talks with Inside Appalachia host Jessica Lilly about the risks of drinking untreated water from an abandoned coal mine.

That’s on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting – telling West Virginia’s story.

Jessica Lilly

The coal industry has done a lot for central Appalachia. It’s created jobs, and it’s helped many families afford college. Coal has also created a  very strong sense of pride. But as jobs in the coal industry have declined, so have the opportunities in Central  Appalachia. On this episode of Inside Appalachia, we explore one of the legacies of of the industry: crumbling water infrastructure.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On West Virginia Morning, a new national report says the state’s bad roads are costing drivers a lot of money and Inside Appalachia host Jessica Lilly talks with a Wyoming County family about the quality of their water. 

That’s on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting – telling West Virginia’s story.

Dr. Geoffrey Cousins
Jean Snedegar

Since 2010, West Virginia Public Broadcasting has produced a series called Inspiring West Virginians, highlighting 29 leaders in health, business and science. In this week’s episode, we hear three of these stories- a kind of finale- because this is the final year of the Inspiring West Virginians series.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, Patricia Harman is the author of the bestselling novel The Midwife of Hope River

A midwife herself, she was featured in an April 2016 episode of Inside Appalachia focused on the tradition of home birth in the region.

Harman's latest book – The Runaway Midwife – hits bookstore shelves Monday. 

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