Don Blankenship

Jacquelyn Martin / Associated Press

Former Massey Energy CEO Don Blankenship is hosting a town hall meeting for voters next week as he revs up his candidacy for the U.S. Senate.

This post was last updated on Tuesday, December 5, 2017 at 3:35 p.m.

 

Former Massey Energy CEO Don Blankenship has officially filed paperwork to run for U.S. Senate in West Virginia.

Walter Scriptunas II / AP Photo

Editor's Note: This is a developing story. Please be sure to revisit this post for the latest. This post was last updated Wednesday, November 29, 2017 at 7:22 p.m.

 

Former Massey Energy CEO Don Blankenship is running for U.S. Senate as a Republican. Blankenship served one year in federal prison for conspiring to violate federal mine safety standards in the wake of an explosion that killed 29 miners in April 2010.

AP Photo

The Supreme Court is leaving in place the conviction of ex-Massey Energy CEO Don Blankenship for misdemeanor conspiracy to violate federal safety standards at a West Virginia mine where 29 miners died in 2010.

Dave Mistich / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Ex-Massey Energy CEO Don Blankenship has petitioned the U.S. Supreme Court to overturn his conviction for misdemeanor conspiracy to violate federal safety standards at a West Virginia mine where 29 miners died in 2010.

Blankenship, who recently finished a one-year prison term, asked the top court Thursday review his conviction, which a federal appeals court upheld in January.

Blankenship Trial
Dave Mistich / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Former Massey CEO Don Blankenship has asked President Donald Trump to resist attempts in Congress to enhance criminal penalties for coal executives who violate mine safety and health standards.

Blankenship, who recently was freed from federal prison, also asked the president in a letter Tuesday to re-examine a federal investigation into the nation's worst coal mining disaster in four decades.

Former Massey Energy CEO Don Blankenship is marking his release from federal custody with an appeal for vindication by the U.S. Supreme Court.

Blankenship served a one-year federal prison sentence after being convicted of conspiracy to violate federal mine safety laws. The charges stemmed from the disaster at a Massey Energy mine in West Virginia in 2010 that left 29 coal miners dead.

Dave Mistich / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Former Massey Energy CEO Don Blankenship is finishing up a one-year federal prison sentence arising from the deadliest U.S. mine explosion in four decades.

According to the U.S. Bureau of Prisons website, Blankenship was set to be released Wednesday from a halfway house in Phoenix, Arizona. He must serve one year of supervised release.

UBB Mine Disaster
E-WV / WV Humanities Council

On April 5, 2010, the day after Easter, a series of explosions rocked the Upper Big Branch mine near Montcoal in Raleigh County.

Twenty-nine men died, making it West Virginia’s worst mining disaster since 78 miners were killed at Farmington in 1968.

After the Upper Big Branch explosion, an independent investigation determined that sparks from a longwall miner had ignited a pocket of methane, setting off a chain of explosions that surged more than two miles through the mine.

Dave Mistich / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Former Massey Energy CEO Don Blankenship has been moved to a halfway house as he nears the completion of his federal prison sentence.

The Charleston Gazette-Mail reports that Blankenship has been placed in a halfway house in Phoenix, according to the U.S. Bureau of Prisons website.

A federal appeals court has refused to rehear the case of former Massey Energy CEO Don Blankenship in the deadliest U.S. mine disaster in four decades.

The 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals handed down the order Friday.

Don Blankenship
Chris Tilley / AP Photo

Attorneys for Don Blankenship are seeking more time to file a petition for a rehearing in order to consult with the convicted former Massey Energy CEO in prison.

Blankenship's attorneys filed a brief Wednesday with the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Richmond, Virginia. The court last week affirmed Blankenship's conviction in connection with the deadliest U.S. mine disaster in four decades.

Don Blankenship
Joel Ebert / The Charleston Gazette-Mail

A panel of appellate judges has affirmed a ruling that sent former Massey Energy CEO Don Blankenship to prison.  The decision means he’ll serve out the remainder of his one-year prison term in a California penitentiary. 

Flood, Clendenin
Kara Lofton / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

A National Weather Service meteorologist called it a "1-in-1,000-year" storm. By the time it was over, 23 West Virginians were dead.

Flooding that ravaged the state in late June was voted the No. 1 news story in 2016 in West Virginia by Associated Press member newspapers and broadcasters.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On West Virginia Morning, Ashton Marra joins host Beth Vorhees to discuss the appeal hearing in the case of former Massey Energy CEO Don Blankenship and Glynis Board visits a lab in the Northern Panhandle that is making new products out of coal.

That’s on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting – telling West Virginia’s story.

West Virginia Supreme Court chamber
West Virginia Judiciary

Out-of-state and dark money spenders (campaign contributions from nonprofits and super PACs that don’t have to disclose the sources of their funding) are contributing more money to judicial elections than they have in previous years.  

AP Photo

A defiant Don Blankenship declared himself an "American political prisoner" on his blog, blaming others for the 2010 mine explosion that killed 29 men and landed the former West Virginia coal operator in federal prison.

The ex-Massey Energy CEO posted the 67-page booklet Tuesday and said he'll distribute it to 250,000 people.


AP Photo

Coal industry groups are concerned that the conviction of former coal executive Don Blankenship could expose other industry leaders to criminal conspiracy charges.

Coal Associations from Illinois, Ohio and West Virginia shared concerns in a brief Tuesday with the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, which is considering Blankenship's appeal.

Don Blankenship
Dave Mistich / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Lawyers for former Massey Energy CEO Don Blankenship are arguing that his conviction related to the deadliest U.S. mine explosion in four decades should be reversed, saying the government's prosecution theory and proof fell short.

The Charleston Gazette-Mail reports Blankenship's legal team filed a 94-page opening brief Monday with the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals. The brief urges "close appellate scrutiny" of Blankenship's conviction and complains that the jury pool was biased against him, the prosecution was politically motivated and the trial controlled by rulings unfair to the defense.

Don Blankenship
Chris Tilley / AP Photo

Ex-Massey Energy CEO Don Blankenship, is scheduled to report to prison Thursday after being convicted of conspiring to willfully violate mine safety standards at West Virginia's Upper Big Branch coal mine, which exploded in 2010, killing 29 men.

A federal court has denied an emergency motion filed by attorneys for ex-Massey Energy CEO Don Blankenship requesting that he remain free while he appeals his conviction.

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