budget cuts

Glenville State College

This year’s state budget included more than $16 million in cuts to higher education institutions, forcing many schools to raise tuition and fees. But Glenville State College is trying to buck that trend.

WVU to Increase Tuition 5 Percent after $9M Cut

Jun 29, 2017
Woodburn Hall, WVU
Associated Press

West Virginia University is joining other colleges and universities in the state that are raising tuition to deal with state budget cuts.

WVU’s Board of Governors voted Thursday to increase tuition for both in- and out-of-state students by about 5 percent in the upcoming 2017-2018 school year.

Marshall University
Wikipedia / en.wikipedia.org

Marshall University's Board of Governors has adopted four potential proposals in anticipation of funding cuts from the state.

Each of the plans accepted Wednesday will use tuition hikes to compensate for about 60 percent of the cuts and will reduce university spending to account for the other 40 percent. 

Wayne County
David Benbennick / wikimedia commons

The Wayne County Board of Education has decided to eliminate 84 jobs to balance the budget.

The board made the cuts at a special meeting Tuesday to account for a multi-million dollar shortfall. The cuts will consolidate and eliminate positions.

Will Price / West Virginia Legislative Photography

Senators voted 20-14 Wednesday, approving their Senate plan for the 2018 fiscal year. 

The bill, which contains no new revenue or a draw down from the State's Rainy Day Fund according to Senate Finance Chair Mike Hall, relies on about $160 million in cuts to government spending. 

On The Legislature Today, education is once again debated on the Senate floor, but this time the education chair shares concerns over a bill he’s sponsoring.

In the House, delegates progress a Right-to-Work bill one that makes changes to the current law being challenged in the state’s court system.

And advocates are pushing second chance laws that they say will help felons reintegrate into their communities and keep them out of prison in the future.

Those stories and more on The Legislature Today.

Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

A bill aimed at giving the state’s two largest universities more control over their own affairs advanced in the House of Delegates Monday.

House Bill 2542 is a large bill, 33 pages in fact, with several provisions. But its main intent is to give the state’s higher education institutions more flexibility in hiring and salary rates.

Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

Delegates are beginning to consider bills that would cut some state agencies, no matter how big or how small they are. Members of one committee Friday looked at a bill that would put an end to an agency that receives about $150,000 in annual funding.

House Bill 2646 would get rid of the West Virginia Women’s Commission. It’s a small state agency with just two employees, one of whom works part-time. The House Government Organization Committee considered the bill Friday morning – where its sponsors defended the proposal.

Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin
Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

State agencies will experience mid-year budget cuts for the second year in a row as West Virginia tax collections continue to come in below estimates. 

Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin announced the 2 percent, across-the-board cuts for state agencies in a press release Tuesday. 

Swimmerguy269 / wikimedia Commons

West Virginia University's president says the school must reduce spending by $45 million by 2020.

The Charleston Gazette-Mail reports that President E. Gordon Gee announced Monday during his State of the University address that cuts will be coming.

Ashton Marra / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

West Virginia Board of Education members are giving Boone County’s school board until July 18 to make drastic cuts to their budget. 

State board members voted 6 to 1 Thursday to take over Boone County schools if the local school board does not take action to reduce its budget by Monday. Former Delegate Tom Campbell was the only nay vote.

The Legislature Today
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Del. Mick Bates of Raleigh County discussed his party's proposals in the House to increase road funding. Those proposals have failed so far this session, but now Bates and other members of the House are waiting to see what Senators will do with a bi-partisan bill that would increase some fees in order to generate revenue.

On the latest episode of The Legislature Today, Speaker Tim Armstead discusses  two bills union members across the state are speaking out against: Right-to-Work and a repeal of the state's prevailing wage. Both are measures the Republican supports.  

Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

The state’s budget is always the final bill approved by lawmakers before they end their legislative work for the year. But even though that vote won’t come until the end of March, members of the House Finance Committee are already looking for ways to deal with declining revenues. On Wednesday, they focused in on lottery funds.

Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

In Governor Earl Ray Tomblin’s State of the State address last week, he proposed budget cuts all across the board, and Higher Education is looking at another big reduction this year.

For years, Higher Education in West Virginia has endured budget reductions from the state legislature. Some representatives from the state’s public universities have voiced concern that lawmakers aren’t taking the cuts and their impacts on the system seriously, and with a proposed 14 million dollar cut by Governor Tomblin again this year, they’re not feeling much better.

The Legislature Today
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this episode of The Legislature Today, the West Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals heard oral arguments Tuesday in the case to replace former state Senator Daniel Hall. 

Marshall University faculty and staff will get smaller raises because of state budget cuts.

The university said in a news release that its governing board approved a resolution Wednesday, Dec. 9, scaling back raises from 3 percent to 2 percent in the fiscal year 2016 budget. The raises will take effect in January.

Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

About a dozen education officials from around the state addressed the Legislative Oversight Commission on Education Accountability in an interim meeting Monday.

Budget cuts for higher education has been a topic many in the state find frustrating, and this feeling was no different at Monday’s interim meeting.

Classroom
Emily Hanford

An education official says West Virginia's public schools face an estimated $16 million cut in state aid under the governor's spending reductions.

Department of Education chief operations officer Joe Panetta tells The Charleston Gazette-Mail that the level of cuts won't be finalized until Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin issues an executive order this week.

e-wv, The West Virginia Encyclopedia

A severe decline in the state's severance tax revenues has Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin calling for yet another round of budget cuts for state agencies, as well as other cost saving measures. 

Tomblin announced the cuts through a press release Monday evening. 

The mid-year, across-the-board 4 percent agency cuts combined with a 1 percent decrease in state aid to public schools-- a budget item typically protected from reductions-- will help make up for the projected $250 million deficit expected during the 2016 Fiscal Year.


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