West Virginia Morning

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, the special session of the West Virginia Legislature this year was supposed to be focused on one thing—putting together a budget for the 2018 fiscal year, but over the course of several weeks, lawmakers spent most of their time debating a separate issue: tax reform.

It turns out, West Virginia wasn’t the only state having the conversation about changing its tax code this year. In fact, 23 states attempted to make changes specifically to taxes charged on services. 

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, the coal industry in West Virginia has been struggling, but over the past several months, revenues from coal severance taxes have increased for the state. That’s because of increased demand overseas, says West Virginia University Research Assistant Professor Brian Lego.

Lego is a member of the WVU Bureau of Business and Economic Research team that recently released its annual report predicting the future of the industry. He discussed the report with Ashton Marra.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, Nimish Metha has been a pediatric emergency medicine doctor at Women and Children’s Hospital in Charleston for more than 16 years.

Kara Lofton talked with Metha about what it’s like to work in the ER, what items he wouldn’t have in his own home after seeing children come into the hospital with injuries and how he’s seen the opioid epidemic impact the pediatric population.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

U.S. Senator Bernie Sanders held two health care rallies Sunday in Covington, Kentucky and Morgantown, West Virginia, telling attendees to put pressure on their state representatives to vote against the GOP health care plans.

Kara Lofton spoke with Sanders about his visits and what he thinks the proposed legislation would mean for Appalachia. 

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Today marks one year since floods devastated many parts of West Virginia, killing 23 people and causing major damage to many communities, including homes, businesses and schools.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

A Morgantown summer music clinic is taking local kids and turning them into rock stars—teaching them the importance of the arts while introducing them to new and exciting people. This story is part of Joni Deutsch's 30 Days of #WVmusic, the interview series celebrating the folks who make the West Virginia music scene wild and wonderful.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, we'll hear about ways to deal with emotional stress associated with a traumatic event, like last the 2016 flooding in southern and central West Virginia. Inside Appalachia host Jessica Lilly speaks with Dr. Carol Smith, of Marshall University, about ways family and friends can help victims cope with disaster.

Also, The Allgheny Front's Reid Frazier takes a look at the effects of increased trucking from the fracking industry on small towns in northern West Virginia and southern Pennsylvania.

Will Justice Sign a Budget Bill without New Revenue?

Jun 15, 2017
West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, Gov. Jim Justice is still pushing lawmakers to approve some kind of revenue increasing measure to prevent major cuts in the 2018 budget. 

That push, though, comes as members of the House and Senate are debating budget bills based solely on a newly released revenue estimate, not tax reform proposals that were once at the center of budget negotiations.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, Senate President Mitch Carmichael says legislative leaders and the Governor are inching closer to a budget deal that he's "optimistic" can be approved by next week.

Carmichael says that budget deal will be based on a tax reform plan approved in the Senate last week that was voted down twice in the House.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, a West Virginia University student is using his award as a Newman Fellow to aid veterans who have received less than honorable discharges. 

Research shows many of these veterans suffer from some sort of trauma which often contributes to their discharges.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On West Virginia Morning, Statehouse Reporter Ashton Marra reports from the Capitol after lawmakers returned for a special budget session last week.

And we hear from the Ohio Valley Resource's Mary Meehan who reports on the addiction crisis in the Ohio Valley which is causing another health problem in the region - a heart infection called endocarditis.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, over the weekend, Pres. Donald Trump will reach his 100 day mark in office. 

As a part of our series "100 Days in Appalachia," Beth Vorhees checks in with Dave Mistich, the managing editor of the project, about the stories they've shared in the first 100 days and what to expect in the future.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, we meet members of the United Mine Workers of America's Local 1440 union in Matewan, where a group of retired miners say they don't see Pres. Donald Trump's promises  to bring coal jobs back to the region coming true. 

The group, which largely voted for Democratic Presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, says coal's struggles aren't the result of former Pres. Barack Obama's policies, but of the free market.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, we travel to Loudendale, West Virginia, where James Shaffer has been making brooms by hand for more than 70 years. He says the business has changed.
And we hear Andrew Bird play "Pulaski at Night," on this week’s Mountain Stage song of the week.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Today marks 9 months since devastating flooding in the south-central part of the state took the lives of 23 West Virginians, damaging hundreds if not thousands of homes and businesses. Many communities are still recovering from that flooding, but lawmakers in the House are attempting to take steps to make sure floods aren’t as destructive in the future.


West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Governor Jim Justice has lit the lantern in the Capitol dome signaling a state of emergency in West Virginia. The move is a symbolic one, according to the governor, who says the Republican plan to reduce funding to Medicaid would result in a healthcare emergency in the state. 


West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On West Virginia Morning, from the Ohio Valley ReSource reporter Nicole Erwin talks with victims of human trafficking.

That’s on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting – telling West Virginia’s story.

Education Changes Move at the Legislature

Mar 16, 2017
West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On West Virginia Morning, Liz McCormick reports lawmakers are looking to reduce spending on education, but they say they will give local schools more flexibility in how they spend their money and West Virginia’s Poet Laureate Marc Harshman has won a prestigious poetry award.  We’ll hear him recite some of his work from the winning book.  

W.Va. Demonstrators Defend Affordable Care Act

Feb 27, 2017
West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On West Virginia Morning, Appalachia Health News reporter Kara Lofton covered a rally in Charleston where demonstrators are seeking to save the Affordable Care Act and we’ll have a report about the ACA and rural hospitals and health clinics.

That’s on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting – telling West Virginia’s story.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, Lawmakers will begin their work at the statehouse today as they gavel in for the first of the 60-day legislative session.

That work  will be followed by Gov. Jim Justice’s first State of the State Address tonight where he’ll present legislators—and the public—with his legislative agenda and his plan to balance the 2018 budget. Statehouse reporter Ashton Marra discusses what to expect during the session and the governor's address.

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