West Virginia Morning

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, we travel to Loudendale, West Virginia, where James Shaffer has been making brooms by hand for more than 70 years. He says the business has changed.
And we hear Andrew Bird play "Pulaski at Night," on this week’s Mountain Stage song of the week.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Today marks 9 months since devastating flooding in the south-central part of the state took the lives of 23 West Virginians, damaging hundreds if not thousands of homes and businesses. Many communities are still recovering from that flooding, but lawmakers in the House are attempting to take steps to make sure floods aren’t as destructive in the future.


West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Governor Jim Justice has lit the lantern in the Capitol dome signaling a state of emergency in West Virginia. The move is a symbolic one, according to the governor, who says the Republican plan to reduce funding to Medicaid would result in a healthcare emergency in the state. 


West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On West Virginia Morning, from the Ohio Valley ReSource reporter Nicole Erwin talks with victims of human trafficking.

That’s on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting – telling West Virginia’s story.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On West Virginia Morning, Liz McCormick reports lawmakers are looking to reduce spending on education, but they say they will give local schools more flexibility in how they spend their money and West Virginia’s Poet Laureate Marc Harshman has won a prestigious poetry award.  We’ll hear him recite some of his work from the winning book.  

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On West Virginia Morning, Appalachia Health News reporter Kara Lofton covered a rally in Charleston where demonstrators are seeking to save the Affordable Care Act and we’ll have a report about the ACA and rural hospitals and health clinics.

That’s on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting – telling West Virginia’s story.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, Lawmakers will begin their work at the statehouse today as they gavel in for the first of the 60-day legislative session.

That work  will be followed by Gov. Jim Justice’s first State of the State Address tonight where he’ll present legislators—and the public—with his legislative agenda and his plan to balance the 2018 budget. Statehouse reporter Ashton Marra discusses what to expect during the session and the governor's address.

Nairouz Katrib
courtesy of Liu Yang

On this West Virginia Morning, Nairouz Katrib is a Syrian immigrant. She moved to West Virginia 8 years ago to study at West Virginia State University.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, Patricia Harman is the author of the bestselling novel The Midwife of Hope River

A midwife herself, she was featured in an April 2016 episode of Inside Appalachia focused on the tradition of home birth in the region.

Harman's latest book – The Runaway Midwife – hits bookstore shelves Monday. 

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On West Virginia Morning, a report on the energy policy positions of Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump and Liz McCormick profiles the two major candidates for state treasurer.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Pepperoni rolls have been called the unofficial food of West Virginia. Legend has it they were originally made for coal miners to take underground in their dinner buckets- because the cured pepperoni didn’t spoil. 

A new book ABOUT Pepperoni Rolls is set to be published next year. On this week's episode of Inside Appalachia Roxy Todd talks with the writer of this new book to learn more.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

A look back at how West Virginia turned politically from blue to red. Anne Li took a deeper look at what happened leading up to the flip back in 2014 and whether voters’ feelings then will impact this year’s state legislative races.

Also, Allegheny Front reporter Reid Frazier looks at why some worry Shell's new ethane cracker in Beaver County will bring pollution back to Pittsburgh. The planned facility will use ethane from the region's natural gas to produce 1.6 million tons of plastic a year.  

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, hear highlights from last night's second and final gubernatorial debate between billionaire Jim Justice and  state Senate President Bill Cole.

And as much of the state deals with the problem of overdoses, the West Virginia State Board of Education doesn’t want to stand by till it happens at a public school. Clark Davis reports on how some schools in the state are taking extra steps to prepare for worst-case scenarios.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Two years in, the challenges and benefits of expanded Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act. Kara Lofton reports that while the program has been overwhelmingly beneficial, coming up with funds for it is still a challenge. 

With the opioid crisis driving up overdose rates across the Ohio Valley, a once-obscure medication is becoming a household feature. Naloxone can reverse an overdose and, with training, can be administered by just about anyone. Aaron Payne reports that the drug is saving lives, but is no silver bullet for the region’s addiction problems.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, an NPR Investigation in 2014 found Justice was one of many coal mine owners across the country who had ignored millions of dollars in safety fines, putting miners at risk. At the time, Justice promised to pay all of his fines.

He didn't. In fact, NPR has found he is now the nation’s top delinquent mine owner, owing more money than he did two years ago and NPR's Howard Berkes reports his debts extend far beyond his coal mines.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Pennsylvania's natural gas is a hot commodity in energy hungry markets throughout the Northeast. But there's some concern that the radioactivity common in the state's shale deposits could be making its way into the gas--and into people's homes as radon. The Allegheny Front's Julie Grant has more.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Dr. Robert Rupp weighs in on the importance and power of political debates both nationally, and here in West Virginia. He’s a member of the State Election Commission and a professor of political science at West Virginia Wesleyan College. Rupp spoke with Ashton Marra about the first presidential debate and what West Virginia’s candidates for governor can take away from it before they hit the air waves tonight. 

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

First: In the 12 refugee resettlement areas in Kentucky, Ohio, and West Virginia, evacuees are thriving. Forty Syrian refugees are expected this month in Bowling Green, Kentucky, where more than 10,000 asylum seekers from around the world have settled over the past 35 years, creating new homes and new businesses.

Then: the current President of the Kentucky Coal Association is leaving the energy industry, for a job back in his hometown of Huntington, West Virginia. Hear his thoughts on how business can spur healthier communities.

...on this West Virginia Morning.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

This West Virginia Morning, the special meaning behind apple pie with the state's folklorist, Emily Hilliard.

Learn more about the RECLAIM Act with reporter Benny Becker who spoke with two lobbying participants about their hopes that the bill will open new opportunities for coalfield economies.

And: Jam grass heroes Leftover Salmon return to Mountain Stage this week, with a song that contemplates West Virginia History: "Blair Mountain." Listen to Leftover Salmon with this Mountain Stage song of the week.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

The U.S. Chemical Safety Board approved recommendations last night that were the result of an investigation into a 2014 Charleston chemical leak. 

The leak spurred a tap water ban for more than 300,000 West Virginians. Before the vote, the board heard directly from members of the public who were affected by the leak. 

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