Liz McCormick

Eastern Panhandle Reporter/Producer

Elizabeth McCormick grew up in Charleston, West Virginia with her grandmother. She graduated from Capital High School in 2010 and graduated from Shepherd University in 2014 with a Bachelor of Arts in Communications - Digital Film and a minor in Theatre. During her time at Shepherd, Liz studied abroad at the University of Pau, in Pau, France for a month in summer 2012, and she was on the first executive board of Shepherd's French Club that began in spring 2013.

In the summer of 2013, Liz did an internship at the Cannes Film Festival in Cannes, France working in the Producers Network as a guide to those attending, and in summer 2014, Liz interned with West Virginia Public Broadcasting in Charleston. She is now the Eastern Panhandle Reporter/Producer for West Virginia Public Broadcasting based out of Shepherdstown, WV.

Liz has been involved in choir ensembles and vocal technique since she was seven-years-old, and she has performed on stage in theatrical works since 1999. An aspiring filmmaker, singer/songwriter, novelist, screenwriter, and voice actor, Liz identifies herself as an artist of many trades and wishes to bring her love of art to the world.


Ways to Connect

Doug Estepp / Coal Country Tours

The West Virginia Mine Wars is a period of our state’s history that until around the 1980s was often censored or left out in classrooms across the state. But a new class through Shepherd University's Lifelong Learning Program will offer tools for history teachers in West Virginia and beyond.

Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

Two bills that both died on the final night of the 2015 legislative session, resurfaced Monday during interim meetings - forced pooling and public charter schools. Both ideas erupted in debate in 2015, but Monday’s discussions were calm and reflective – but not without some concerns.

The separate discussions Monday on forced pooling and charter schools were mostly on how to make these controversial pieces of legislation work for lawmakers and interested parties on both sides of the issues.

Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

About a dozen education officials from around the state addressed the Legislative Oversight Commission on Education Accountability in an interim meeting Monday.

Budget cuts for higher education has been a topic many in the state find frustrating, and this feeling was no different at Monday’s interim meeting.

Liz McCormick / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Interim meetings at the state capitol are usually laid back. Lawmakers attend their meetings and sometimes meet with a spare group of lobbyists and constituents.

Sunday, however, the House Government Organization Committee Room was overflowing. Men and women in union t-shirts filled the audience seats, the hallway and even the stairwells outside. What drew the crowd? A proposed piece of legislation that would make West Virginia a Right to Work state.

Liz McCormick / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Representatives from Google made a stop in Berkeley Springs Monday to speak with middle schoolers about staying safe online.

Here at Warm Springs Middle School in Berkeley Springs, 470 sixth, seventh and eighth-graders sit in the bleachers of their gymnasium listening to two representatives from Google.

Sarah Lowther Hensley / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

West Virginia’s representatives gave their support to a U.S. House bill that authorizes spending up to $325 billion on transportation projects during the next six years.

After three days of debate and some 100 amendments considered, House Resolution 3763, the Surface Transportation Reauthorization and Reform Act of 2015, passed on a vote of 363 to 64. The bill approves more than $300 billion in spending on the country’s transportation projects. It includes $261 billion for roads and bridges.

Liz McCormick / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Two weeks after President Obama’s visit to West Virginia, aimed at putting the spotlight on substance abuse issues across the country, the state’s leaders are still talking about ways to combat the issue.

At a forum in Martinsburg, Governor Tomblin met with those struggling with the disease and others trying to provide assistance in the Eastern Panhandle.

National Governors Association

With President Obama’s visit to Charleston just two short weeks ago, people and organizations across the state have responded to the President’s call to fight drugs and overdose deaths in West Virginia.

On Wednesday, Governor Tomblin continues this fight and travels to Martinsburg to host a summit with law enforcement and the community on substance abuse in the area.

Liz McCormick / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

The MBA program at Shepherd University hosted a panel discussion in Martinsburg Wednesday night that drew in a large crowd. The topic – the Affordable Care Act. The goal of the discussion was to look at the good, the bad, and the unknown and discuss how it directly affects West Virginians.

Dozens of people attended the event at the historic McFarland House in Martinsburg. Like most controversial pieces of legislation, the Affordable Care Act, or ACA, has received plenty of attention since it was first enacted in 2010 – good and bad.

Shepherd University

Poet and activist Nikki Giovanni  loves several things about Appalachia: its defense of freedom, and how the people here know when enough is enough in regards to material wealth.

Perry Bennett / WV Legislative Photography

As part of a continuing effort exploring possible changes to the state tax code, members of the Joint Select

Committee on Tax Reform held a day-long public hearing at the capitol Tuesday. The hearing allowed West Virginia citizens to share their suggestions for ways to improve the state’s tax structure, and while at least a dozen citizens showed, few lawmakers filled the seats to listen. That, however, didn't stop members of the public from openly sharing what they think are the right steps for West Virginia.

Perry Bennett / WV Legislative Photography

The debate over drug testing public assistance recipients was revisited in an interim session Monday. One of the issues on the table is how to make a pilot program work without costing the state additional dollars that are hard to come by.

Liz McCormick / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

The country will turn its eyes to Charleston this week as President Obama makes a trip to the capital city Wednesday. He’ll hold a town hall style meeting with West Virginians focused on substance abuse. The issue, however, has weighed heavy on the minds of state lawmakers over the past several years and continues to be a topic of conversation in the Legislature. During interim meetings Sunday, legislators began to look at the effects substance abuse is having on the state’s workforce and how they can combat the problem.

Sharon Shlomo / PikiWiki

On Friday and Saturday, the Eastern West Virginia Community and Technical College in Moorefield will host the first Ag Tech Showcase event in the state.

The goal of the new showcase is to explore the benefits new and emerging technologies could offer small and medium-sized farms.

Submitted Photo

This week Shepherd University is hosting the 20th Annual Appalachian Heritage Festival. Many of the planned festivities surround the 17th Annual Appalachian Heritage Writer-in-Residence.

Liz McCormick / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

It’s been 59 years since the Curtis Freewill Baptist Church in Harpers Ferry has been open with a regular congregation. This historical African-American church was the main building of worship during the days of Storer College, a predominantly black school that first began as a place to teach former slaves and eventually grew into a full-fledged degree-granting institution.

The final stop of the statewide West Virginia Next Generation Standards tour will be Tuesday, September 29 at Shepherd University.

Potomac River
TimK MSI / wikimedia commons

Update: Wednesday, September 30, 2015 at 11:45 a.m.

Current models estimate the diluted discharge will reach Hagerstown, Maryland by October 3 and Harpers Ferry by October 10. Rain may alter the projections. The discharge is expected to continue to flow downstream and become diluted.

Washington's Top News reports the spill is not expected to impact the Washington, DC area's water supply. The full impact of the spill is still being investigated by the Maryland Department of the Environment.

Andrea Booher / Wikimedia Commons

In July, the United States House of Representatives voted on House Resolution 1599, the Safe and Accurate Food Labeling Act. It passed the House and has now moved on to the Senate. If passed into law, it would create a federal voluntary labeling standard for genetically modified foods or those with genetically modified ingredients. Labeling would also be regulated by the FDA. Here in West Virginia, there’s been some talk and show of concern from some over this bill, including a group in the Eastern Panhandle.

Brett Clashman / Wikimedia Commons

The 167th Airlift Wing in Martinsburg celebrates the official opening of its C-17 Training System Facility Thursday, September 24, 2015.

At this new training facility, C-17 pilots, loadmasters, and maintenance engine run technicians from the 167th Airlift Wing will receive a combination of classroom instruction and simulator training.