Dave Mistich

Digital Editor/Coordinator

A native of Washington, W.Va., Dave Mistich joined West Virginia Public Broadcasting in October of 2012, as the Charleston Reporter. He covered stories that ranged from the 2012 general election, the effects of Superstorm Sandy on Nicholas County and a feature on the burgeoning craft beer industry in the state. Dave has contributed to all locally-produced news and public affairs programs at West Virginia Public Broadcasting, including West Virginia Morning and Inside Appalachia, as well as The Legislature Today.

Dave has also contributed to NPR newscasts  and newsmagazine programs, including All Thing Considered, upon multiple occasions--covering the major gas line explosion in Sissionville in December 2012, U.S. Sen. Jay Rockefeller's announcement in January 2013 that he won't run for reelection in 2014, the murder of Mingo Co. sheriff Eugene Crum in April of 2013,  a set of new lawsuits against DuPont for their production of C8, and the January 2014 water crisis that affected 300,000 West Virginians across nine counties. He also covered the February 2015 CSX oil train derailment in Fayette County. 

In June 2013, his coverage of the Sissionville gas line explosion won an award for Best Breaking News from the West Virginia Associated Press Broadcasters Association.

When West Virginia Public Broadcasting launched its new web presence in October 2013, Dave became Digital Editor / Coordinator. In this role, Dave oversees news coverage online and works with the rest of the news staff in developing new and unique ways of telling stories on the web.

On Thanksgiving night 2013, West Virginia Public Radio premiered Mountain Stage at 30: A Radio Retrospective, an hour-long radio special/documentary that Dave produced on the history of the live performance radio show. Dave also took part in Moutain Stage's 30th Anniversary Celebration show and interviewed guests and former staff and crew during a live broadcast.

Before coming to West Virginia Public Broadcasting, Dave worked as a freelancer for various newspapers and magazines locally and around the country, including The Charleston Daily Mail,  Relix, and PopMatters, where he focused exclusively on critiquing and writing about popular music. 

A graduate of Marshall University’s W. Page Pitt School of Journalism & Mass Communications, Dave holds a Bachelor of Arts in Radio-Television Production & Management.  He is also finishing a Master of Arts Journalism degree there and is hopelessly trying to complete a thesis which focuses on America’s first critically-oriented rock magazine, Crawdaddy!

Ways To Connect

Robb Kendrick / National Geographic

West Virginia lawmakers and other state officials are responding to the filing of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Clean Power plan. The final rule, submitted Monday, aims to cut carbon emissions at existing power plants in hopes to offset the effects of climate change.

The plan uses state-specific targets to reduce emissions by 32 percent by 2030 from levels recorded in 2005. It mandates that states begin complying with the new regulations by 2022. 

To view the interim and final goals for carbon emissions in West Virginia "at a glance", see this PDF document from the Environmental Protection Agency. 

Dave Mistich / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

West Virginia Public Broadcasting radio host Jim Lange is known for a lot of things: host of Classical Music as well as being the host of the mind-expanding, genre-bending Eclectopia.

Cabell-Huntington Hospital

 Cabell-Huntington Hospital is one step closer to acquiring St. Mary’s Medical Center. An antitrust agreement filed by Attorney General Patrick Morrisey’s office establishes a series of conditions for the acquisition.

At a news conference Friday, Morrisey said the agreement ensures the merger follows state and federal law while also providing access to affordable health care in the area through economic competition.

www.mine-engineer.com

Federal inspectors issued 139 citations and three orders at U.S. mine operations in June.

The Mine Safety and Health Administration says the inspections were conducted at 10 coal mines and five other mines in 11 states, including Kentucky, Virginia and West Virginia.

The Clarksburg Post

Updated July 30, 2015 at 5:10 p.m.

After intense public outcry, the convenience store Sheetz has apparently reversed its decision to end sales of a West Virginia bakery's pepperoni rolls at its locations in the state.

In an interview Thursday morning with The Clarksburg Post, the convenience store's director of brand strategy Ryan Sheetz confirmed that decision.

Andrew Brown via Twitter: @Andy_Ed_Brown

Updated: July 20, 2015 at 2:10 p.m.

According to leaked tape obtained by West Virginia Focus, The Charleston Gazette-Mail publisher and other executives said the staff size of the merged paper will drop following the reapplication process.

theodoranian / wikimedia Commons

West Virginia advocacy groups are reacting to a new federal ruling that further protects the LGBT community. A Thursday ruling by the federal Equal Employment Opportunity Commission has deemed discrimination against workers based on sexual orientation illegal.

Logo courtesy of Mark Lerner

Us & Them host Trey Kay tackles two big issues on the latest episode of the podcast this week: evolution and climate change. And while those issues are obviously divisive, Trey explores a new twist in the battle over these topics.

There are those out there willing to give thousands of dollars to anyone able to disprove their theories. 

Trey spoke with Beth Vorhees about the new episode and how money gets involved in the debates over these topics.

Flickr / davidwilson1949

The West Virginia Joint Committee on Government and Finance says WorkForce West Virginia has failed to turn over more than 50 emails and other important documents, including ones that show efforts from outside interests to influence the development of the prevailing wage rate methodology.

Wikimedia Commons

Despite taking many steps to prevent injuries, West Virginia ranks highest for the number of injury-related deaths in the United States. That’s according to a new report published this week that looks state-by-state at injury prevention policy.

Many of the injury-related deaths that put West Virginia in the lead nationally are attributed to drug overdoses, according to data compiled by Trust for America's Health (TFAH). The organization published the new report along with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Its title: The Facts Hurt: A State-By-State Injury Prevention Policy Report

Data by SNL Energy / Data Visualizations by Dave Mistich / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

The following data and article is the result of collaboration between West Virginia Public Broadcasting and SNL Energy. To see related stories from SNL Energy on this topic, please click here. 

Larry Dowling / West Virginia Public Broadcasting


Step into any of West Virginia’s 11 craft breweries Friday and you’re bound to feel a bit of a celebratory vibe. That’s because a new law goes into effect that brewers hope will drive more business their way and expand the state’s growing craft beer industry even further.

 

Princeton University Press

Us & Them tackles an extremely hot topic in their latest episode, The Talk: the battle over whether or not (and how) sexual education should be taught in American schools.

In addition to taking a look at recent controversies, host and producer Trey Kay interviewed historian and New York University Steinhardt School of Culture professor Jonathan Zimmerman about the history of sexual education in the episode.

Zimmerman's latest book, Too Hot to Handle: A Global History of Sexual Education, explores the issue in-depth and concludes that despite all the fuss, children in American schools rarely get exposed to much about sexuality in the classroom.

    

A federal investigation of West Virginia’s system of care for children in need of mental health services shows the state fails to comply with federal law.

In a 30-page letter to Governor Earl Ray Tomblin dated Monday,  June  1, the U.S. Department of Justice said their investigation shows the state's mental health care system for children “fails to provide services to children with significant mental health conditions in the most integrated settings appropriate to their needs in violation” of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).

Title II of the ADA requires that “individuals with disabilities, including children with mental illness, receive supports and services in the most integrated setting appropriate to their needs,” according to the letter from the Department of Justice.

Dave Mistich / West Virginia Public Broadcasting


While law enforcement officials, lawmakers and medical professionals are all scrambling to find solutions to West Virginia’s heroin epidemic, EMTs and paramedics across the state are receiving calls almost daily, rushing to the homes of those who’ve made it to the very edge with their addiction.

“Most people, they hear about the problem with heroin. But, I don’t know that they fully understand and can fathom how much of an epidemic it truly is and how many lives are affected by it so adversely,” said Captain Chad Jones, a paramedic and shift supervisor for the Charleston Fire Department.

Dave Mistich / West Virginia Public Broadcasting / via Tableau

A bill aiming to stave off West Virginia's problems with heroin and prescription opioid overdose deaths goes into effect Wednesday. The Opioid Antagonist Act expands access to the life saving drug Naloxone, allowing addicts and family members the ability to purchase the medicine through a prescription.

Dave Mistich / West Virginia Public Broadcasting / via Tableau

As the stories airing this week on West Virginia Morning illustrate, West Virginia is in the midst of a heroin epidemic. According to  the state Department of Health and Human Resources'  Drug Overdose Database, heroin has claimed the lives of more than 600 West Virginians since 2001. 

But what else can we glean from this information? When did it all begin? And which counties are seeing the highest rate of deaths related to heroin overdoses?  

The interactive map below paints a dark picture of the state's problem with the drug in recent years and also shows other key facts as medical professionals, emergency officials, law enforcement officers and lawmakers all attempt to find solutions. 

  Seemingly everyone in West Virginia has been affected by the heroin epidemic in the state. There are addicts themselves, family members struggling to find them help, the doctors, nurses and paramedics on the front lines trying to save lives and lawmakers and law enforcement officials trying to put a stop to it all--no one seems to be spared.




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On Friday, May 1, West Virginia Public Broadcasting debuts its new podcast, Us & Them. The program, hosted by Peabody Award-winner and Charleston native Trey Kay, seeks to explore the issues that create vast cultural divides. 

NASA

Satellite images from NASA and other government agencies can tell us a lot about the changing of the climate as well as the environment. Their photo series State of Flux: Images of Change depicts noticeable differences in our world over various spans of time--looking at everything from water, air, natural disasters, as well as the impact of industry.

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