Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome

A nursery where drug-affected babies are treated at Lily’s Place in Huntington, W.Va.
Aaron Payne / Ohio Valley ReSource

A new federal study, called “Federal Action Needed to Address Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome,”recommends educating both health care providers and pregnant women on screening and prenatal care to address drug addiction and withdrawal in newborns.

West Virginia Rep. Evan Jenkins and Sen. Shelley Moore Capito say it's the first federal study on neonatal abstinence syndrome to examine the best practices and approaches to treating infants exposed to opioids during pregnancy. 

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, U.S. Health and Human Resources Secretary Tom Price talks with West Virginia officials about the state's opioid addiction crisis during a stop on a Trump Administration listening tour.

We also hear from two West Virginia University addiction specialists about the language of addiction and how it affects treatment outcomes.

Born Addicted: The Race To Treat The Ohio Valley’s Drug-Affected Babies

Feb 4, 2017
Pregnant, woman, profile
John Ted Dagatano

She asked to not be identified. And it’s understandable given the stigma attached to addiction. For this story, we’ll call her “Mary.”

Mary lives in eastern Kentucky and has struggled with an addiction that began with painkillers and progressed to heroin.

“As soon as I opened my eyes, I had to get it,” Mary said. “And even when I did get it, then I had to think of the next way that I was going to get.”

Baby
Mangus Manske

U.S. Senator Shelley Moore Capito introduced a federal bill Friday with bipartisan backing that would help newborns suffering from Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome have access to quality care.

The Caring Recovery for Infants and Babies Act, also known as CRIB, would recognize residential pediatric recovery facilities as providers under Medicaid.

This means the families whose newborns are born with NAS will be able to bill Medicaid for the services offered.

U.S. Sen. Shelley Moore Capito is sponsoring a federal bill to examine the rising rate and treatment costs of neonatal abstinence syndrome or NAS.

Senator Capito introduced the bi-partisan bill Friday, along with two other U.S. senators.

Opiate Addiction Sometimes Begins in the Womb

Nov 24, 2015
Dollar Photo Club

Neonatal abstinence syndrome, or NAS as it’s known in the medical community, is yet another problem that stems from the heroin epidemic ravaging West Virginia. NAS occurs in newborns exposed to opiates while still in the womb. When they’re born, they feel the full effects of withdrawal.

Health care professionals are now trying to come up with ways to track and deal with the problem more effectively.