Methamphetamine

Drug Enforcement Agency

U.S. Sen. Joe Manchin is calling on state lawmakers to make certain cold medicines used to create methamphetamine available by prescription only.

In a letter Thursday, the Democrat asked the Republican-led Legislature to limit pseudoephedrine sales to people with prescriptions. It would apply to cold medicines like Sudafed.

Manchin pointed to successes Oregon and Mississippi, where the medicine is prescription-only.

Drug Enforcement Agency

A Kanawha County task force is again recommending that West Virginia legislators pass a law requiring people to get a prescription for a cold medicine that's used to make methamphetamine.

West Virginia Legislature

Two major retailers in West Virginia announced this week they would no longer be selling some over the counter cold medications in their stores. CVS Pharmacies stopped selling single-ingredient pseudoephedrine medicines in late June and Walgreens intends to follow suit.

Senator Greg Tucker of Nicholas County sponsored legislation this year intended to curb the meth problem by making psuedoephedrine—meth’s main ingredient—available only by a doctor’s prescription. The bill, however, died in the final hours of the session.

Drug Enforcement Agency

  Pseudoephedrine sales in West Virginia are down 30 percent this year compared to the same five-month period in 2013.

Data from the NPLEx tracking system show pharmacies in West Virginia have sold 145,526 boxes of cold medications containing pseudoephedrine since January. Pharmacies sold 205,113 boxes during the same period last year.

The data also show a 40 percent decrease in the number of pseudoephedrine purchases that are blocked.

The Law Works - Heroin and Methamphetamine

Mar 21, 2014

The Senate moves a bill that would make pseudoephedrine prescription-only as a Schedule IV controlled substance, the House of Delegates reacts to Monday's public hearing on SB 373. As Co-Chair of the Joint Legislative Oversight Commission on State Water Resources, Del. Mike Manypenny has big questions and concerns over the water after this month's chemical spill.

The Senate moves a bill to make pseudoephedrine prescription-only, the House of Delegates weighs public comments in regards to the Senate's water protection and above-ground storage tank regulation bill, and Attorney General Patrick Morrisey talks about a his office's investigation on the chemical spill, price gouging, and the need for more legislative audits.

Subscribe to the podcast for daily downloads of the program.

Drug Enforcement Agency

A West Virginia resident and a Florida man have admitted their roles in a methamphetamine trafficking case.
 
     Forty-nine-year-old Howard Leon Lykins II of Charleston pleaded guilty in federal court in Charleston on Tuesday to maintaining a residence for drug purposes. Forty-four-year-old Richard Milton Hudson Riggall of Zephyrhills, Fla., entered a guilty plea to possession with intent to distribute methamphetamine.
 

Drug Enforcement Agency

Methamphetamine lab seizures jumped 85 percent in West Virginia in 2013.
 
     A West Virginia State Police report says authorities seized 533 meth labs, compared to 288 in 2012.
 
     The report says police found meth labs in 45 of West Virginia's 55 counties. Kanawha County led the state with 159 meth lab seizures, followed by 36 in Wood County and 28 in Putnam County.
 

WV State Troopers, WV State Police
Suzanne Higgins / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

  West Virginia State Police say they've arrested dozens of people in southern West Virginia on charges of manufacturing methamphetamine during targeted efforts in the past month.

Since October 26 state troopers in Webster, Pendleton, Randolph, and Braxton counties found 2 meth labs, arrested 14 people and seized a little over $1000.

This resulted in 28 felonies and 2 misdemeanor charges.

RayNata / wikimedia

A state task force says West Virginia should require prescriptions for cold medications that contain an ingredient used illegally to make methamphetamine.
 
     The recommendation is one of several approved Wednesday by the Governor's Advisory Council on Substance Abuse.
 
     The Charleston Gazette  says the council also recommended that Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin oppose any legislation that would legalize marijuana for medical or recreational use.
 

RayNata / wikimedia

An industry trade group has launched a campaign in West Virginia opposing legislation that would require prescriptions for medications containing pseudoephedrine.
 
     Pseudoephedrine is also used illegally to make methamphetamine.
 
     The Consumer Healthcare Products Association began running ads this week on Charleston-area news websites. The group also has set up a website called Stop Meth, Not Meds, a Facebook page and a Twitter account.
 

A West Virginia-based pharmacy chain is hoping to combat the illegal manufacture of methamphetamine by stocking a tamper-resistant form of the drug used in its production.

Fruth Pharmacy, which has 27 locations in West Virginia and Ohio, announced it will begin stocking a drug called Nexafed. The tablet contains the active ingredient pseudoephedrine, similar to the popular brand-name allergy drug Sudafed.