Roxy Todd

Reporter

 Roxy moved to West Virginia in 2009 and has been hooked on the stories here ever since. Since 2011 she has been producing stories with Allegheny Mountain Radio and the Traveling 219 Project, and many of these stories have also aired on West Virginia Public Radio. Her story about Richwood’s Ramp Festival was featured on NPR’s Morning Edition. The Traveling 219 Project that she helped create was awarded a national award of merit from the American Association for State and Local History.

Roxy is a native of middle Tennessee. In 2005 she graduated from Warren Wilson College, where she studied Creative Writing, Theater and Education. She worked for Warren Wilson’s newspaper and contributed to the college’s literary journals, The Pulp and The Well

In 2006 Roxy and her friend Patrick Seick wrote a sci-fi rock opera called Osama Baby. The play was performed at the Montford Park Amphitheater in Asheville, NC. 

Ben Allen/ WITF

It's an unsettling reality in Appalachia. Many people, young and old, rich and poor, are falling victim to heroin addiction.

True, heroin addiction is spreading in communities across the country. But here in Appalachia, people in remote rural areas have an even more difficult time finding access to treatment options.

Skudrafan1/ Wikimedia Commons

Governor Earl Ray Tomblin today joined local, state and federal representatives to cut the ribbon on 4 and a half stretch of the Corridor H highway from Bismarck in Grant County to the Tucker County Line.

The ceremony doesn’t mean the highway will be completed anytime soon.

It has already taken fifty years to develop it.

Appalachian foodies will be interested to hear that the forests in Appalachia could be an ideal environment for growing mushrooms on logs in your own backyard.

The catch? It’s labor intensive, and if you want to sell your mushrooms to the public, you’ll need to show proof that your mushrooms are edible.

Still there are a handful of people in Appalachia who have been growing shiitake mushrooms for decades.

If you want information about where to find help for substance abuse in West Virginia, call 1-866-WV-QUITT, contact your local comprehensive behavioral health center, or visit the West Virginia Prescription Drug Abuse Solutions Program's website.

Roxy Todd / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Drug courts are becoming a more and more popular option for judges dealing with minor drug offenders in West Virginia. Instead of being incarcerated, offenders go through a highly structured, highly monitored rehabilitative process overseen by a probation officer and counselor.

Courtesy of Kenneth King and the WV Mine Wars Museum

Amid news of more mine lay-offs, one former coal town has built a labor museum to attract visitors. Driving down to the new West Virginia Mine Wars Museum , you really feel the fading towns and cities, sliding into the backdrop of the mountains. It's surreal. Many places in Appalachia are. It’s sad to many people who remember the thriving economy here when coal was booming. Wilma Lee Steele says she hopes the museum in Matewan will become a place where people throughout the coalfields can come to reclaim their identity. “I think that we have a lot to say, and I think we’re gonna say it. We’re gonna tell our history, and we’re gonna come together as a community.”

Credit Courtesy Of WV State Archives (WVSA), Coal Life Collection

This past weekend, over 500 people visited Matewan, West Virginia to catch a glimpse of a new museum that tells the story of a dark and bloody time in West Virginia’s labor history.

In this episode of Inside Appalachia, we’re taking a road trip through the region to find people who are reviving the old recipes and bringing something fresh to our plates. This episode is also helping us kick off a new segment, called Appetite Appalachia, which features restaurants and recipes with Appalachian roots.

A free workshop on agriculture and building a healthier community is being hosted this week in Williamson, W.Va.

Live poultry will have to stay home from this year's State Fair of West Virginia and the Tri-County Fair held in Petersburg because of concerns that the Avian Influenza that has affected much of the United States might be spread to poultry-producing areas of this state.

Catherine Moore

If you live in Appalachia, you know that one of the most sensitive topics to talk about can be coal. In this episode of "Inside Appalachia," we'll hear liberal and conservative points of view, as we take on the complicated subject of the future of coal.

WVDOH

wikimedia / Wikimedia

In Kanawha County, reoccurring mud and rock slides have led to the on and off closure of a portion of route 60 near Cedar Grove.

A community group has organized a meeting in Belle this evening to discuss the long-term impacts that these reoccurring closures could have on businesses and residents.

Robert Sharpe Productions, Before the Mountain was Moved

In December of 1964, President Lyndon B. Johnson welcomed the first group of 20 VISTA volunteers:

“Your pay will be low; the conditions of your labor often will be difficult. But you will have the satisfaction of leading a great national effort and you will have the ultimate reward which comes to those who serve their nation and who serve their fellow man.”

Many of those early VISTAs came to Appalachia. They served as afterschool tutors and helped build community centers. But some of the early VISTA volunteers in West Virginia also worked to encourage community members to engage in local and state politics to lobby for better strip mining legislation, local campaign reform, and black lung legislation. 


 

In this episode, we’re revisiting a show from the Inside Appalachia archives. Remember those Love Letters that the town of Thomas wrote for another small town back in February? Well, they were delivered. We’ll find out which town received those letters in this episode. We’ll also hear a love letter written to a famous racehorse named Zenyatta, a story about bald eagle mates who remained together till death, and other stories about our complicated love of Appalachia. 

U.S. Senator Joe Manchin
Courtesy Photo

Sen. Joe Manchin says he will remain in the United States Senate and not run for Governor. He made the announcement today, after telling people he was seriously considering a return to the Governor's mansion because of gridlock in Congress.

Robert Sharpe Productions, Before the Mountain was Moved

In honor of National Service Week and the 50th Anniversary of VISTA (Volunteers in Service to America), this week we're looking back to the stories of some of the first VISTA volunteers who came to West Virginia.

Linda Tanner/ Flckr

The Monroe County Landmarks Commission recently submitted a letter to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, or FERC. The group opposes the latest proposed route for the Mountain Valley Pipeline, which cuts very close to a historic mineral springs hotel.


Stephanie Petersen

Volunteerism is a strong part of West Virginia culture- neighbors helping neighbors in times of disaster.

A new study released this month says  West Virginia has the 5th largest number of people signing up to join AmeriCorps. Those volunteers serve in West Virginia and across the country.  


Wendell Smith/Flickr

Here in Appalachia, it’s ramp season, and that means many small towns have their annual ramp feed to help raise money for their communities. This week we’ll travel to the Feast of the Ramson in Richwood, West Virginia, where we’ll meet 12-year-old ramp digger, Tyler McCune. And we’ll head to the Shenandoah Valley to hear a crowd of shape note singers. Although more and more people are leaving Appalachia, we will also hearing from some, like musician John Wyatt, who have returned home.

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