News

Courtesey of the artist.

Mountain Stage with Larry Groce announces two live events for November and tickets are available now to Mountain Stage Members.

David Benbennick / Wikimedia Commons

A sheriff in West Virginia has announced his resignation after seven months on the job.

News outlets report Monroe County Sheriff Sean Crosier submitted his resignation to county commissioners Tuesday, effective Sept. 4. Crosier said in a statement that he has taken a job with an undisclosed organization that prepares the U.S. Department of Defense and other security agencies for chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and explosive attacks.

Flickr / davidwilson1949

Jim Johnson has been named director of the West Virginia's new Office of Drug Control Policy.

Department of Health and Human Resources Secretary Bill Crouch announced Johnson's appointment Thursday.

Woodburn Hall
http://history.wvu.edu/r/images/homepage/13223

Freshmen enrollment at the West Virginia University system has hit a record 6,224 as classes started at its three campuses.

Six West Virginia educators have been chosen for Teacher of the Year award.

Dollar Photo Club

West Virginia cities are considering ordinances targeting property owners for repeated illegal incidents on their premises.

Local news outlets report similar proposals in Huntington and Nitro follow the model of a Martinsburg drug house ordinance that went into effect in May and has since produced several busts.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, the shocking events in Charlottesville, Virginia, last weekend are yet another reminder of deep division in America. More specifically, it seems like battles that ripped our nation apart 150 years ago, continue to smolder.

West Virginia Governor's Office

The country’s newest Republican governor is, like President Donald Trump, a billionaire businessman, a political outsider, and a fan of the coal industry. West Virginia Gov. Jim Justice, a former coal company owner, was elected as a Democrat but switched parties with a surprise announcement at a Trump rally in West Virginia.

Both Trump and Justice campaigned on promises to bring coal mining jobs back to the region. Now Justice wants the president to prop up the flagging coal industry with federally-funded incentives for power companies to purchase coal from Appalachia.

 

NPR

After Charlottesville, we wonder if racism and fascism are on the rise across America and/or West Virginia.

Front Porch host Scott Finn found a survey showing white millennials were just as likely to hold racist beliefs as baby boomers and Gen Xers. Why do more than one third of whites still tell researchers that "blacks are lazier than whites"?

Huntington Police Department

Members of the West Virginia NAACP have requested the creation of a citizens' police review board for one of the state's largest cities.

News outlets report West Virginia NAACP President Owens Brown and the Wheeling NAACP proposed the creation of an independent board to analyze the Wheeling Police Department at Tuesday's city council meeting. The board would be made up of local citizens from different religious and fraternal organizations.

McMurran Hall at Shepherd University in Shepherdstown
Cecelia Mason / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Shepherd University has launched its newest college – a College of Business. According to the Higher Education Policy Commission, it’s the fifth college of business offered at a higher education institution in West Virginia.

Women's March, Donald Trump, Inauguration
Joni Deutsch / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

The Herbert Henderson Office of Minority Affairs (HHOMA) is hosting an event in Weirton Thursday evening, focused on helping minority residents across West Virginia.

HHOMA invites the public to speak about issues that affect their community, like economic concerns, housing, education and health. Those concerns will then be relayed to Governor Jim Justice. 


Boston Globe

The latest events in Charlottesville have people engaging in conversation about race, diversity and supporting each other. 

Cabell County, Huntington
David Benbennick / Wikimedia Commons

Students in at least one West Virginia county will be allowed to get out of school early to watch next week's solar eclipse.

The Herald-Dispatch reports that Cabell County Schools Superintendent Ryan Saxe said at a Board of Education meeting Tuesday that parents will be allowed to pick up students up to one hour early next Monday as an excused absence. The county's school system will operate on a regular schedule that day.

A board that will help develop a medical marijuana program in West Virginia is holding its first meeting.

The advisory board is set to meet Wednesday at the University of Charleston. Among the topics for discussion is a work plan for the program's first year. The meeting is open to the public and will include a comment period.

Underground Mine, Miners, Mining
Robert PEnergy / wikimedia commons

The public will have a chance to comment on two power companies' proposal to purchase the Pleasants Power Station in West Virginia from Allegheny Energy Supply.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, we pick back up with Crystal Snyder, a single mother of two, who lost her job a couple of years ago. But she didn't lose hope. Roxy Todd has more of Crystal's story in this next installment of The Struggle to Stay.

Mike Hall
Will Price / West Virginia Legislative Photography

West Virginia Gov. Jim Justice has appointed state Sen. Mike Hall as his new chief of staff.

Justice says in a news release that the Putnam County Republican "has a reputation for being able to work with everybody."

Cat, Stray, Stray Cat
Pixabay

A city council in West Virginia has approved the second reading of an ordinance that would stop people within its limits from keeping cats that create a nuisance.

The Bluefield Daily Telegraph reports the Princeton City Council unanimously approved the second reading of the amended ordinance Monday.

Franklin Cleckley, Franklin D. Cleckley, West Virginia Supreme Court
West Virginia Supreme Court

Franklin D. Cleckley, the West Virginia Supreme Court's first black justice, has died at age 77, the court announced Tuesday.

The court said in a news release that Cleckley died at his Morgantown home on Monday. No cause of death was given.

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