Road Bond

West Virginia Gov. Jim Justice
WV Governor's Office

Gov. Jim Justice promised West Virginians on Friday he won’t raise gas and highway taxes further if voters approve a roads bond next week.

Addressing skeptical voters at a senior center in Clarksburg, Justice said taxes are already in place to support bond payments. In his remaining terms as governor, he said he won’t sign legislation to raise them again.

Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

It's been almost two months since Governor Jim Justice, elected as a Democrat, changed his party affiliation to Republican. WV MetroNews's Brad McElhinny talks to Laurie and Rick about the reasons behind the switch, and examine whether it's made the job of governing any easier for Justice. Will it help him with the upcoming road bond referendum?

Opinion: Road Bond Will Bring Immediate Benefits

Sep 12, 2017

When West Virginians turned control of the Legislature over to Republicans in 2014, they did so with a clear mandate: turn the state’s economy around and help create jobs.

In the years since, we’ve reformed the state’s legal environment, begun stripping needless regulations off the books, and passed a right-to-work law to make our state more attractive to new businesses.

Jeff Gentner / AP Photo

With National Voter Registration Month in September coming just ahead of a statewide special election, the West Virginia Secretary of State’s office is encouraging voters to make sure their registration makes them eligible to head to the polls in early October. 

Ashton Marra / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Gov. Jim Justice has signed legislation allowing the West Virginia Parkways Authority to increase the tolls on the state turnpike and create a new single fee program in the name of a bond to fund new road projects in southern West Virginia.

The bill is part of his roads package, a set of bills and bond initiatives that will boost revenue for road maintenance and construction and in turn, according to the governor, create jobs.

Ashton Marra / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

The Charleston area has lost construction jobs at the second-fastest rate in the nation according to a survey from the Associated General Contractors of America.

A representative of the national group presented the results of the survey of 358 metro areas at the Capitol Wednesday, accompanied by West Virginia Department of Transportation Secretary Tom Smith.