Radio

Josh Saul

Singer, songwriter, golf pro, and nationally recognized horse race handicapper Chip Taylor may be the actual Most Interesting Man in the World. While he's written hits like "Wild Thing" and "Angel of the Morning," one of his best known solo albums was his country-influenced "This Side of the Big River," which featured a cover of the famous Johnny Cash tune of the same name. He performs it live on this week's broadcast of Mountain Stage.

In 1956, Tuke reopened The Greenbrier’s Art Colony.
e-wv, The West Virginia Encyclopedia online. / Gladys Tuke, The Greenbrier, The Greenbrier Resort Art Colony, Pocahontas County,

Sculptor Gladys Tuke was born in Pocahontas County on November 19, 1899. In the 1930s she took up residency at The Greenbrier resort’s Art Colony and became well known for her sculptures of horses. During World War Two, Tuke taught sculpture and pottery to soldiers who were recovering at The Greenbrier.

In 1958, voters sent Byrd to the U.S. Senate, where he would remain from 1959 until his death in 2010 at age 92.
e-wv, The West Virginia Encyclopedia online. / Sen. Robert C. Byrd, US Senate, 1964 Civil Rights Act, Senate Appropriations Committee

On November 18, 2009, Senator Robert C. Byrd became the nation’s longest-serving member of Congress. He was first elected to public office in 1946. After serving two terms in the West Virginia House of Delegates and one in the state senate, he was elected to three terms in the U.S.

Pioneer Morgan Morgan was an influential member of the Bunker Hill community and helped found Christ Episcopal Church. Today, his grave is part of the church’s cemetery, and a log cabin he built stands nearby.
e-wv, The West Virginia Encyclopedia online. / Morgan Morgan, Bunker Hill, Berkeley County, Christ Church Episcopal Church, Potomoke

Generations of schoolchildren grew up being taught that Morgan was the first permanent white settler in present West Virginia. Now, though, we know that others came before him. A native of Wales, Morgan emigrated in 1712 to Delaware, where he worked as a tailor and a coroner.

Every year on November 14, community members gather at the Marshall University student center to commemorate the crash. At the center, a memorial fountain with 75 jets of water honors
e-wv, The West Virginia Encyclopedia online. / Marshall University, Wayne County, Tri-State Airport, Marshall University Student Center

On the night of November 14, 1970, a Southern Airways DC-9 approached a foggy and rainy Tri-State Airport in Wayne County. The airliner slammed into a hillside just short of the runway and burst into flames. All 75 passengers were killed.

There’s a structure to what you hear on West Virginia Public Radio that’s about to change.

Each show on the station is governed by a “clock.” These graphical representations of each hour lay out what happens in a program and when.  

Whether it’s a newscast, a promotion for what is coming up later in the show, or a regular segment such as West Virginia Morning or the Marketplace Morning Report, it all happens at a precise time according to the clock. This clock is how we coordinate between hosts that are in NPR’s studios in Washington, D.C. and beyond, and West Virginia Public Radio’s hosts who are in our studios in Charleston, so we don’t end up talking over each other.

Brian Blauser

Husband and wife duo Shovels & Rope return to this week’s broadcast of Mountain Stage with songs from their latest album, Swimmin’ Time. Here they perform the song “Evil,” which showcases their passionate harmonies and uncharacteristically dark lyrics.

Brian Blauser / Mountain Stage

Winter is coming. Jack Frost is nigh. Santa Clause is coming to town. Whatever way you say it, it's cold outside, so stay inside, curl up next to the fire and listen to some heart- and ear-warming tunes on "Mountain Stage After Midnight." Broadcast from 1am-5am Saturday and Sunday mornings here on West Virginia Public Radio, "Mountain Stage After Midnight" takes the best episodes from the show's 31 year history and shares their memories and songs with our late-night listeners.

Josh Saul

Since this week's A Change of Tune is dedicated to indie/alternative takes on Disney music, it would only make sense to chat with West Virginia Public Radio's very own Mouseketeer, Larry Groce. His contributions to records like Disney's Children's Favorite Songs ​and Disney's Christmas Favorites were understated (you'll never see his smiling, bearded face on a record cover) but impactful (millennials know how "Froggie Went A-Courtin'," thanks to Larry).

Educator Elsie Clapp was born in Brooklyn Heights and influenced by progressive educator John Dewey.
e-wv, The West Virginia Encyclopedia online. / John Dewey, Elsie Clapp, Arthurdale, Preston County

Educator Elsie Clapp was born on November 13, 1879, in Brooklyn Heights. She was influenced by progressive educator John Dewey, who believed that schools should have a direct impact on the communities they serve.

Schmulbach was one of many German immigrants who turned Wheeling into an important brewing center in the late 1800s.
e-wv, The West Virginia Encyclopedia online. / Wheeling, Henry Schmulbach, Nail City Brewery, Schmulbach Brewing, Mozart Park, The Wheeling Bridge Company

When Henry Schmulbach was a child, he and his family immigrated to Wheeling from Germany. By the time he was a young adult, Schmulbach had become one of the city’s most successful businessmen, selling retail groceries and wholesale liquor.

The last-surviving WWI veteran was Frank Buckles died at Charles Town in 2011 at the age of 110.
e-wv, The West Virginia Encyclopedia online. / Frank Buckles, WWI, Charles Town,

World War I ended , on November 11, 1918, after more than four years of brutal fighting. Nearly 39 million soldiers had been killed, wounded, or listed as missing. American soldiers arrived on the scene only during the last year-and-a-half of the war. Still, some 116,000 died in the conflict.

In the early 1800s, Kanawha County became the salt-producing capital of the nation.
e-wv, The West Virginia Encyclopedia online. / Output pool, Kanawha Salt Industry, War of 1812, Kanawha County

On November 10, 1817, Kanawha County salt operators entered into a unique business arrangement that would set the stage for major industries in the late 1800s. Salt was an essential product in early American history. In the early 1800s, Kanawha County became the salt-producing capital of the nation.

Payram

This week, "A Change of Tune" host Joni Deutsch interviews Piers Faccini, an English singer-songwriter who specializes in intimate folk. Although his bedside folk style invokes comparisons to Nick Drake, Ray LaMontainge and even Jack Johnson, Faccini shows he’s more than just a quiet voice by infusing his music with Delta blues, Mediterranean melodies and neo-classical compositions. His new record with French cellist Vincent Segal, titled Songs of Time Lost, goes to prove why Faccini stands out from the folky crowd.

e-wv, The West Virginia Encyclopedia online. / Reverend Joseph Gluck, Forks-of-Cheat Baptist Church, 1775, Stewartstown

The Reverend John Corbly and 12 others organized the Forks-of-Cheat Baptist Church on the night of November 7, 1775. the. The meeting took place near Stewartstown, about six miles north of Morgantown. The church remains in service today.

Brian Blauser / Mountain Stage

Remember, remember the 8th and 9th of November... for another revolutionary edition of "Mountain Stage After Midnight!" Broadcast from 1am-5am Saturday and Sunday mornings here on West Virginia Public Radio, "Mountain Stage After Midnight" takes the best episodes from the show's 31 year history and shares their memories and songs with our late-night listeners. Each week we'll hand-pick two of our favorite episodes that'll alternate order each night.

At first glance, the battle might not have seemed that significant because Echols’s forces managed to escape.
e-wv, The West Virginia Encyclopedia online. / Droop Mountain Battlefield State Park, General William Averell, General John Echols, Pocahontas County, Lewisburg, Civil War

On November 6, 1863, one of the most important Civil War battles in West Virginia occurred in Pocahontas County. Union General William W. Averell launched a raid, to trap Confederate troops around Lewisburg.

Take a listen as Maestro André Raphel talks with us about his upcoming concert of Spanish and American Music with the Wheeling Symphony Orchestra, their composer-in-residence, Roberto Sierra, and their guest violinist, Michael Ludwig.

Josh Saul

While Canadian singer-songwriter Jill Barber’s smoky, soulful voice has made her an alt-cabaret favorite on Canada's folk scene, she’s also known for penning songs with timeless hooks and melodies. Here she performs “Broken for Good,” from this week’s premiere broadcast of Mountain Stage.

Neale also was a football innovator, developing the “naked reverse,” the five-man defensive line, and man-to-man pass defense. He was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1969.
e-wv, The West Virginia Encyclopedia online. / Greasy Neale, 1919 World Seies, Canton Bulldogs, Cincinnati Reds, National Football League

Alfred Earle Neale was born in Parkersburg on November 5, 1891. As a youth, he excelled at virtually every sport.

Pages