President Barack Obama

President Barack Obama
AP Photo/Steve Helber

The nation’s substance abuse epidemic is taking center stage after President Obama announced new federal policies to combat the issue Wednesday. The president announced those changes during a trip to Charleston.

On West Virginia Morning, full coverage of President Obama’s visit to Charleston yesterday to talk about substance abuse.  Also, coverage of the counter protest at the state capitol, which criticized the president over his stance on coal. 

These stories on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting – telling West Virginia’s story.

Barrack Obama speaks
Carolyn Kaster / Associated Press

President Barack Obama says prescription drug abuse is exacting a terrible toll across the country and causing pain for millions of families.

Coal Forum Rally
Dave Mistich / WV Public Broadcasting

Although the motivation for the President’s visit to Charleston was to focus on combating substance abuse around the country, others thought he should be more concerned with the decline in West Virginia’s economy--specifically in the coal industry.  

The West Virginia Coal Forum held a rally Wednesday morning, focusing on Obama and his administration’s stances on energy and emissions.

On West Virginia Morning, Roxy Todd reports from NPR with an overview of the state's substance abuse issues ahead of President Obama's visit to Charleston today.  Also, voices from Nicholas County gathered by students at Richwood High School from people who have a message for the President about drug abuse.  The latest from the Blankenship trial on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting - telling West Virginia's story.

Richwood High School Student Reporting Lab

Ahead of President Obama's Wednesday visit to Charleston, students at Richwood High School have produced a video highlighting issues of substance abuse in Nicholas County.

Participating in PBS News Hour's Student Reporting Lab, the students at Richwood High spoke to recovering addicts, their family members and law enforcement officials to paint a gripping picture of the problems they face in the area. 

Watch Obama's Addiction Town Hall Meeting in Charleston

Oct 19, 2015
Barack Obama
Ashton Marra / WV Public Broadcasting

President Barack Obama speaks in Charleston Wednesday about West Virginia's epidemic of prescription drug and heroin abuse.

Barack Obama
AP Photo/Susan Walsh

A spokesman for Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin says President Barack Obama will visit West Virginia next week to discuss substance abuse.

Spokesman Chris Stadelman says Obama will travel to Charleston on Wednesday. Details of the visit haven't been released.

Stadelman says Tomblin is pleased that Obama is coming to West Virginia to talk about an issue that has been a focus of the governor's administration.

President Barack Obama's new budget proposal includes more than $3 billion worth of tax credits and other spending to help the Appalachian region recover from the declining coal industry.

The largest new spending would be $1 billion to redevelop abandoned coal mines. The money would go to states and tribes in $200 million increments over five years.

 The budget proposal released Monday also includes $20 million from the Department of Labor for states to help workers who lost their coal mining jobs by training them for other professions and $25 million to the Appalachian Regional Commission to help coal communities develop economic development plans. 

U.S. Senator Joe Manchin
Courtesy Photo

"Our message should be very clear: 'Are you intending to do harm to America or any Americans? Are you planning or training any where in the world to do harm to America or Americans? If you are we have the ability and the right to come and take you out.'  Very simple. That should be very clear with what our mission is. And we shouldn't have to mince words about that.  We know that if someone says you shouldn't go into Syria and that is where ISIL has been training, planning and plotting against America and Americans?  Then go in and get them out." 

Janet Kunicki / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

  West Virginia Attorney General Patrick Morrisey is suing President Barack Obama's administration over allegations of hand-picking which laws to follow.

The Republican's lawsuit was filed in U.S. District Court in Washington, D.C. on Tuesday.

The filing by Solicitor General Elbert Lin targets an Obama administrative fix to let some people temporarily keep unqualified plans under the Affordable Care Act.

U.S. Senator Joe Manchin
Courtesy Photo

  U.S. Sen. Joe Manchin is opposing President Barack Obama's plan to keep 9,800 American troops in Afghanistan after 2014.

In a letter Monday, the Democratic senator urged the president to withdraw all troops from Afghanistan by the end of the year.

Manchin's letter says the war has consumed 12 years, cost untold billions of dollars, and ended the lives of more than 2,000 Americans.

Cecelia Mason

West Virginia's congressional delegation is urging President Obama to reconsider the denial of extra federal aid after a January chemical spill.
The Federal Emergency Management Agency on Feb. 12 denied Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin's request for reimbursement for first responders, nonprofits and public agencies that assisted during the spill. Tomblin appealed the decision on March 11.

"My mouse pad broke, and I had to get my great-aunt some diabetes shoes."

That's how comedian Zach Galifianakis begins his segment with President Obama in an episode of the online interview show Between Two Ferns that was posted Tuesday. It was an interview unlike any other for a sitting U.S. president, as Galifianakis probed the commander in chief's views with a range of oddball questions.

West Virginia Regional Jail & Correctional Facility Authority

A West Virginia inmate faces federal charges of threatening President Barack Obama and his family.
Robert Dale Tasker is charged in an indictment with three counts of threatening Obama and one count of threatening the president's family. The alleged threats were mailed in December and February.

President Obama's State of the Union address as prepared for delivery on Jan. 28, 2014:

Mr. Speaker, Mr. Vice President, Members of Congress, my fellow Americans:

Today in America, a teacher spent extra time with a student who needed it, and did her part to lift America's graduation rate to its highest level in more than three decades.

An entrepreneur flipped on the lights in her tech startup, and did her part to add to the more than eight million new jobs our businesses have created over the past four years.

President Obama signed the $1.1 trillion spending bill into law Friday afternoon, enacting more than 1,500 pages of legislation that received broad support in the House and Senate earlier this week. The expansive bill ensures the U.S. government won't face a potential shutdown until at least October.

The Obama administration confirmed early Friday afternoon that starting next year, it plans to push back the start of enrollment for coverage under the new health care law by one month.

NPR's Julie Rovner tells us via Twitter that White House spokesman Jay Carney says the Department of Health and Human Services "has indicated its intent to shift the 2015 marketplace schedule by one month."

A federal judge has dismissed charges against a West Virginia man accused of sending a threatening letter to President Barack Obama.
     A U.S. Secret Service forensic handwriting analysis showed that 20-year-old Ryan Kirker of McMechen didn't write the letter.
     According to court records, the letter sent to the White House in April was filled with profanity and racial slurs.
     A federal grand jury charged Kirker in June with threatening the president.