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A new study finds rising production costs, not cheap natural gas, was the lead factor that drove thousands of coal mines across Appalachia to close.

The Green Bank Telescope at Green Bank Observatory
Jesse Wright / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

The National Science Foundation heard public comments as part of a process to consider changes to the Green Bank Observatory in West Virginia.

Ellie White of Barboursville, West Virginia, and her family launched a campaign called Go Green Bank Observatory to persuade the National Science Foundation to not divest from Green Bank Observatory.
Jesse Wright / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

A powerful space-exploration facility in operation since the 1950s is under threat. Residents of the tiny West Virginia community in which it resides and its extended family of scientists and educators are rallying to save it.

 

Nestled in the hills in Pocahontas County, West Virginia, is the Green Bank Telescope. At 485 feet tall and about 300 feet across, it’s the largest fully-steerable telescope in the world, and it belongs to Green Bank Observatory.

Green Bank Telescope
Geremia / Wikimedia Commons

Hundreds of individuals attended two public meetings held by the National Science Foundation at Green Bank Observatory. The NSF is considering operational changes for the observatory in light of budget constraints, including potentially shutting down the facility completely. 

MAGNUS MANSKE / WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

West Virginia’s congressional delegation provided information Thursday on how the public can weigh in on the future of the Green Bank Observatory radio telescope in Pocahontas County.

The National Science Foundation will hold two public meetings on November 9th and accept written public comments until November 25th. The National Science Foundation is conducting a review of the observatory because of budget constraints.

The model for a sculpture being created in a cross-dicipline project at West Virginia University.
Aaliyah Brown / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

For most college students, summer is the time to go home and relax from a year of hard work. But some students stayed in Morgantown to work on a unique project that brings the sciences and arts together.

Jessica Hoover created the Community Engaging in Science through Art program, also known as CESTA. She’s an assistant professor of chemistry at West Virginia University. Hoover came up with the idea to bring together students from the arts and sciences to create an installation that will live outside WVU’s Evansdale Campus Library, in Morgantown.

nsf.gov / National Science Foundation

State officials announced today a $20 million grant from the National Science Foundation to fund research at 3 WV universities. 

Governor Earl Ray Tomblin, U.S. Senators Joe Manchin and Shelley Moore Capito and Congressmen David McKinley, Alex Mooney and Evans Jenkins announced the award for West Virginia’s Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research, referred to as EPSCOR. The money will be used to boost research and upgrade infrastructure at West Virginia University, Marshall University, West Virginia State University and other institutions. EPSCoR is overseen by the state Higher Education Policy Commission’s Division of Science and Research.

"As I've gone up through science, I've realized how easy it is to have an impact on the world around you," WVU researcher Scott Cushing said, "even just doing research on the undergraduate level in a lab."
Larry Dowling / WVPublic

 

Scott Cushing grew up in the Charleston area. He once almost failed a middle school science project where he was supposed to build a machine with moving parts out of macaroni.

“It was trying to move, but couldn’t,” Cushing remembers about the macaroni engine he built. The macaroni piston failed, so the engine didn’t move. He got a C on that assignment, but clearly, he was destined for ambitious projects.

Woodburn Hall
http://history.wvu.edu/r/images/homepage/13223

A West Virginia University scholar will be awarded more than $130,000 to study the aftermath of the Ukrainian crisis. 

West Virginia Turnpike
Seicer / wikimedia Commons

West Virginia has undergone significant growth in the number of seismic monitoring stations in the state.

The Charleston Gazette reports that 14 stations have been installed in the past year. Previously, there was only one in the state in Monongalia County.