West Virginia Morning

Weekdays at 7:41 a.m.
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Whether it's important news events, interesting features about people and places, the latest in environmental news, stories about education or the economy, West Virginia Public Broadcasting's team of experienced reporters bring listeners in-depth stories and interviews from around the state.    

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West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, with resources and funding in question, officials in Wood County are still trying to determine how to deal with a large industrial fire just outside of the city limits of Parkersburg.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, this year’s West Virginia Filmmaker of the Year is a Pittsburgh native who hails these days from the Morgantown area.

Here at West Virginia Public Broadcasting, we know Larry Dowling as a production manager -- but he’s also a videographer, lighting designer, grip, gaffer, director, and just about any other role you could think of on a film set. Inside Appalachia’s host, Jessica Lilly spoke with Larry after he won the award.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Climate activists are being trained by former Vice President Al Gore this week in Pittsburgh. As The Allegheny Front’s Reid Fraizer reports, Gore founded the Climate Reality Project 10 years ago, after making his climate change documentary, an Inconvenient Truth. 

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Trey Kay, host of West Virginia Public Broadcasting’s Us & Them podcast, has been working on a series of reports focusing on Charleston’s West Side. His most recent installment explores a new program that awards grants to Charleston Police officers willing to purchase and rehab dilapidated West Side homes, and live there. On this West Virginia Morning, we hear an excerpt from the podcast episode titled “A Policeman is a Person in Your Neighborhood.”


West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, the Ohio Valley region has disproportionately high numbers of seniors and people living with disabilities and on low incomes -- those are all groups that frequently depend on public transit. Without transit, older people lose independence, and reaching a doctor or workplace becomes much harder. 

A new report finds that demand for transit in rural areas is climbing faster than in cities. But as Becca Schimmel reports, spending on rural transit is not keeping pace with demand.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, Late last week, President Trump announced the federal government would stop Affordable Care Act subsidies to insurance companies, which the White House argues are illegal.

While the move affects just a small slice of the overall insurance market, it's been met with widespread opposition from health advocacy groups, who say it’s an attempt to further destabilize the Affordable Care Act insurance markets.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, we preview of our weekend radio show, Inside Appalachia. The latest episode, we visit communities impacted by the creation of flood-control lakes.

Like the Village of Lilly, where in the 1940s, about 40 families were pushed off their land along the Bluestone River in Summers County. Many of these families had lived there for more than 200 years.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, the Environmental Protection Agency’s move to end the Clean Power Plan is the Trump administration’s latest attempt to support the struggling coal industry. The Department of Energy is also pushing a new way to subsidize coal power. But as Glynis Board reports, a new study suggests that market forces -- not regulations -- will still make more coal power plants in the region vulnerable.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

First Lady Melania Trump visited West Virginia yesterday to tour Lily’s Place – a facility in Huntington that serves babies born addicted to substances. Her visit sheds more attention on the Ohio Valley’s addiction crisis.

About 5 percent of all children born last year in West Virginia were affected by drugs -- the highest rate in the country. Aaron Payne has this report on efforts to treat both newborns and parents in the grip of addiction.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, when all was said and done this past weekend, the Secretary of State’s office reports about one in 10 voters showed up to polls, and about 70 percent of them were in favor of passing Governor Jim Justice’s road bond. Glynis Board has details.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, as the number of coal mining jobs continues to decline in central Appalachia, hemp is getting a lot of attention as one way to diversify eastern Kentucky’s post-coal economy. But the region’s growing hemp industry is riddled with uncertainty.

The lack of land suitable for growing hemp and its association with marijuana pose significant challenges. Rachel Cramer, from our partners at WGBH and The GroundTruth Project, has that story.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

A bipartisan group in Congress has a new bill to save pensions for retired union coal miners throughout the Ohio Valley. As Becca Schimmel of Ohio Valley ReSource reports, the coal industry’s downturn has left tens of thousands of pensioners at risk.

Also, on the latest episode of West Virginia Public Broadcasting’s Us & Them podcast, host Trey Kay tells us about an African-American man who broke one of the National Football League’s last color barriers, almost 50 years ago.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

When we left off last time in our Struggle to Stay series, 38-year-old Dave Hathaway, a former coal miner who’d been unemployed for 12 months, was offered a job out of state. But it would mean leaving his wife and newborn baby behind. Then, he got another offer closer to home would put him going back to work as an underground coal miner. The Allegheny Front’s Reid Frazier delivers the final installment of Dave Hathaway’s, Struggle to Stay story.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Following the mass shooting in Las Vegas, President Donald Trump is canceling a previously scheduled trip to Morgantown and a new tool aiming to map overdoses gets attention at Marshall University this week.  

Also, West Virginia has the fourth highest rate in the nation for grandparents raising grandchildren - an arrangement often referred to as “grandfamilies.” And the number of grandfamilies here is on the rise. Most experts blame the opioid epidemic for that. While this arrangement usually benefits children, it can be incredibly stressful for the grandparents. In the second part of our series exploring this subject, Kara Lofton takes a look into the mental health of those involved. 

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, 87-year-old Jim Shaffer has had his hands busy since 1946. He is the last commercial broom-maker left in West Virginia. On Saturday, Sept. 30, a short film about Shaffer will be screened at the American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C. The event is free and open to the public.

State folklorist Emily Hilliard teamed up with Inside Appalachia earlier this year to produce the story, as part of a collaboration between West Virginia Public Broadcasting and the West Virginia Folklife Program.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, our series featuring people who are struggling to stay or leave Appalachia continues. We’ve been following the story of Dave Hathaway, a former coal miner in Pennsylvania.

Last week, we heard about Dave’s struggle as an unemployed father of two trying to hold onto his dignity while his wife works. He and his wife are committed to staying in Greene County, even though the job choices are thin. The Allegheny Front’s Reid Frazier has our next installment of Dave’s Struggle to Stay story.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

A biologist is studying how some insects might be adapting to a changing climate. Scott Hotaling is studying stoneflies that live in glacial regions in the north, and how these animals might be evolving. We'll hear about a grant the city of Huntington is receiving to help first responders combat the drug abuse epidemic. 


West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, we have the first of a series of stories about grandparents who take on the role of primary caregiver for their grandchildren. To begin the series, health reporter Kara Lofton talks with professor Megan Dolbin-MacNab -- a researcher studying grandparent-headed households.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, the hurricane season’s super-charged storms highlighted the importance of disaster planning, and it’s not just a concern for the coasts. Scientists warn that heavy rain events have become more common in the Ohio Valley. Glynis Board looks at how some flood-prone communities are preparing for what experts call “the new normal” of extreme weather.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, geologic studies indicate West Virginia is the largest geothermal hotspot on the East Coast. So why don’t we hear more about it? Liz McCormick reports, some counties in West Virginia have been pushing the envelope for a future in geothermal energy use.

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