News

Classical music sales enter 'survival mode'

May 14, 2015
Gigi Douban

Classical music sales have been struggling for years now. They make up just 1.4 percent of music consumption, compared to 29 percent for rock, according to a Nielsen survey last year. Symphonies from Nashville to Canada’s Prince Edward Island are dealing with mountains of debt. And audiences of classical music haven’t changed much, which makes it tough for artists who aren’t Andrea Bocelli to make it in the industry. 

Small businesses work to keep up on social media

May 14, 2015
Kenny Malone

In the middle of the night, Brenda Shapiro woke up and thought: “LibbyLicious.” The perfect name for a small baking business built from a mandel bread recipe handed down by her husband’s grandmother, Libby.

Unfortunately, the South Florida baker did not wake up with a social media strategy.

“This is why I have my daughter-in-law do this for me,” Shapiro said, “I’m busy baking, delivering, packaging, going out and selling my cookies myself. I’m a one-person show.”

U.S.-certified 'GMO free' on the way, for a price

May 14, 2015
Adam Allington

Chipotle made headlines last month for its decision to remove genetically modified ingredients from the food at its 1,800 stores.

Now, the Associated Press reports that the United States Department of Agriculture plans to start issuing its own certification for foods that are “GMO free." There are currently no government labels that certify a food as GMO-free, nothing akin to Department of Agriculture’s “certified organic” label.

Kai Ryssdal

Facebook's new Instant Articles feature allows news organizations like Buzzfeed and the New York Times to publish articles directly to the site. The pitch is that they'll load faster, so users won't waste precious seconds waiting for content to load. Here's a few things you can do with that free time.

This video was produced by Preditorial.

Elon Musk's evolution, from sci-fi dreams to Space X

May 14, 2015
Kai Ryssdal and Daisy Palacios

Elon Musk runs a couple of high-tech companies, but they do more than code.

They make things like space rockets and electric cars. Elon Musk is the CEO of both SpaceX and Tesla, and now he’s the subject of a new biography by Bloomberg Business reporter Ashlee Vance. It’s called "Elon Musk: Tesla, SpaceX, and the Quest for a Fantastic Future."

Small Business Administration
U.S. Small Business Administration

Nonprofits have until June 1 to apply for federal disaster loans for property damage resulting from a March storm.

The deadline to apply for economic injury loans is Dec. 31.

Magnus Manske / wikimedia Commons

Jackson's Mill has been spruced up for the upcoming 4-H camping season with help from Dominion Resources.

More than 100 Dominion workers spent Wednesday at the state 4-H camp in Lewis County revitalizing the grounds. They landscaped flower beds, painted and repaired a gazebo, rebuilt a stone patio and power washed and painted the amphitheater. They also installed a water filtration system in the fish pond.

Kay Cannon on writing the hit 'Pitch Perfect'

May 14, 2015
Kai Ryssdal and Bridget Bodnar

When "Pitch Perfect," the film about a female college a cappella group came out in 2012, it was considered a surprise hit at the box office. When its writer, Kay Cannon, heard that the studio wanted to do a sequel, she says she was not only terrified, but,  "I thought I was going to barf.”

On West Virginia Morning, Ashton Marra reports that Governor Tomblin has asked the state board of education to study the viability of the Schools for the Deaf and Blind in Romney.  That story on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting – telling West Virginia’s story.


PODCAST: Mad Men ends

May 14, 2015
David Brancaccio

First up, more on the news that college enrollment in the U.S. is down 2 percent from last year. Plus, a growing number cities are taking banking regulation into their own hands—requiring the banks they work with to pass muster as "socially responsible." That means investing in low-income areas, helping distressed homeowners and avoiding predatory lending practices. And with Mad Men ending this Sunday, AMC is rolling out a marathon ... and an interesting ad strategy.

Marketplace

Marketplace Tech for Thursday, May 14, 2015

May 14, 2015
Marketplace

Why Jeeps are turning into luxury SUVs

May 14, 2015
Gigi Douban

Gas prices have gone down, car sales are bouncing back, and a big part of that growth is the SUV market. One particular area of renewed consumer demand has been where space and cushiness intersect: the luxury SUV. Auto makers are paying attention.

Jeep just announced it'll make a luxury SUV to compete with Range Rover. And ultra-high-end brands like Bentley, Maserati, and even Rolls-Royce are jumping into the six-figure SUV sphere.

Just don't call the Rolls-Royce all-terrain vehicle an SUV. That sounds so pedestrian. Rolls has a better idea.

It's a Mad Mad Men world for AMC

May 14, 2015
Nova Safo

AMC is sending off its series "Mad Men" in style. On Wednesday night, the network started a marathon of all episodes of the show, running in order, leading up to the series finale Sunday night.

During the finale, AMC will also turn off programming at its sister networks, including IFC and BBC America, pointing audiences to the "Mad Men" finale.

The major promotional push for the show is also a strategic business move for AMC.

When you're too cool for school

May 14, 2015
Tony Wagner and Tobin Low

2 percent

That's how much college enrollment in the U.S. has fallen in the last year, according to a new study published Thursday. As the WSJ writes, improvements in the job market have likely affected enrollment at four-year for-profit colleges and two-year public colleges, where students tend to skew older.

$262 million

Shelley Moore Capito and Joe Manchin joined four other U.S. senators to unveil new legislation aimed at pushing back on proposed federal clean air regulations.

 

Standing beside four other Republican senators and Democrat Joe Manchin, Shelley Moore Capito introduced the The Affordable Reliable Energy Now Act on Wednesday, May 13, at a press conference in Washington, D.C. 

Jesse Wright / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

 

The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, or FERC as it’s known, held an environmental scoping meeting for the Mountain Valley Pipeline (MVP) on Tuesday, May 12, at Jackson’s Mill in Lewis County. The vast majority of those who spoke said they don’t want to see the pipeline built.

 

Harrison County landowner Autumn Long said she’s concerned about several aspects of the project, including potential environmental damage. But she also spoke against the idea that the project might supply West Virginian homes and businesses with gas, as she says has been suggested in a report the pipeline company filed about the project.

Ashton Marra / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

The West Virginia Department of Education is partnering with West Virginia University and the National Institute for Early Education Research to conduct a long term study on early childhood education in the state.

The study will follow a group of three and four-year-olds beginning in West Virginia’s pre-K system this fall through the next five years of their education, tracking their achievement along the way.

Freedom Industries
AP

  A judge has rejected a $6.7 million bankruptcy plan by the company behind a January 2014 chemical spill.

In a Charleston federal bankruptcy court filing Wednesday, Judge Ronald Pearson said Freedom Industries and state environmental regulators haven't agreed on cleanup terms at the Charleston spill site. Pearson ordered Freedom to comply with state cleanup orders.

How human behavior impacts the economy

May 13, 2015

The problem with many macroeconomic models is that they make predictions that don't account for human behavior. And, as many of us may know, human beings are not always logical.

"In the 1940s, economics started getting highly mathematical," says Richard H. Thaler, founding father of behavioral economics and a professor at the University of Chicago Booth School of Business. "It was basically because economists weren’t smart enough to write down models of real behavior, that they started writing down models of highly rational behavior – and they kind of forgot about humans."

Pages