When W.Va. lost its voice: JFK's death still resonates

12:00 am
Tue October 29, 2013

When W.Va. lost its voice: JFK's death still resonates

Lead in text: 
In 1960, then-Senator and Presidential Candidate John F. Kennedy visited McDowell County, West Virginia and forged a bond with those living in the state's southern coalfields. It was a victory in West Virginia's Democratic primary that helped confirm his broad appeal to the rest of America. After winning the presidential election, Kennedy exposed the rest of the country to the perils of poverty that faced the region. In this article, USA Today reports on the way Kennedy's assassination has resonated with those living in southern West Virginia, the way things were then, and how they are now.
Kennedy in West Virginia is a great story of American politics. A candidate found his issue, found his voice, kept his promise. Kennedy, in some sense, became Kennedy. WELCH, W.Va. - The coal fields of southern West Virginia have never gotten over the assassination of John F. Kennedy.