#WVmusic

Jess Keathly

"There is so much killer music that comes out of here, and always has. It’s amazing to join in on the tradition of West Virginia music."

J.R. Smiley

"I like my tunes and melodies to be disarming and my themes to be disturbing. It is my exact intent."

Allie Hughes

"Whenever the music scene overlaps with each other's camps, you start building new relationships with people who wouldn't have had the chance to meet otherwise. It's a win-win for everybody."

Burns Exposures

"People want something tangible, something they can hold, something of substance. This is one of vinyl's greatest strengths."

Michelle Waters

"It’s kind of outrageous to think that the only place credible music business is done is Nashville. People listen to and play music everywhere, so why only do business in Nashville? It doesn’t make sense to me."

Courtesy of the artist

"It’s fun to see how we can use the [WVU School of Music] techniques we spent so many years perfecting for something completely different. It’s interesting to show people what you can do with classical music."

Rebekah Call

"The space around you, the space between notes, the space between people in a relationship… that’s all explorable. The chords aren’t as powerful without the space in-between."

Courtesy of the artist

"All-ages punk music scenes were my gateway into this whole thing."

Ginger Willis

"Expect to lose money, but don't let it deter you. If you are just starting out, don't expect some big pay day. You will pay out more than you take in."

Joel Prince

"I want to help push all music, be a part of all music. I never want to be in a box."

Lori Kilgore Miller

"We never set out to be that band that plays three hours of just [covers]. We wanted to have our own sound. I think we’re on that track."

"If I ever need humbled, I can remember that I live in the same town that Vince Gill does [laughing]. If I ever feel like, 'Oh man, I’m really sounding good on guitar,' I can just remember that I’m probably not even the best guitar player on the block."

Josh Saul / saulphoto.com

Last summerJoni Deutsch's 30 Days of #WVmusic series celebrated the minds and music shaping the new culture of West Virginia.

We heard from poster makers to festival creatorsR&B folkers to venue owners from the Northern Panhandle down to the Southern Coalfields.

The series amplified West Virginia's music scene to national media outlets like NPR Music and Poynter, all while forging life-long musical friendships and collaborations within our own state.

This summer, we hope to do it all over again with 30 brand new features packed into 30 days, but we need YOUR help.

Josh Saul / Mountain Stage

On Sunday, February 12, Mountain Stage will have a sweetheart of a Valentine's Day show as we welcome special guest host Todd Burge to present the long-running public radio show.

Libby Knight

In April 2015, they released their first full-length Snowflake Mandala. Less than a year later, they earned an entry into the 2016 International Blues Challenge with their second release U Can't Bother Me. And now, Huntington rockers The Shadowshaker Band are back with a bigger band and a bluer sound.

We sat down with The Shadowshaker Band's Eve Marcum-Atkinson and Michael Lyzenga in the #wvpublic studios to talk about the band's new record Heart on the Line and their blues-y beginnings.

Lovely Pixels / www.lovelypixels.com

If you're reading this right now, chances are you made it out to last Sunday's #WhyListen First Listen Music Party at Shepherdstown's Town Run Brewing with MiBurg. If you did, we have a new music playlist waiting for you.

Ryan Fischer / The Parthenon

Have you ever wondered what makes a new song into a good song? Or why West Virginia music sounds so different from the rest? Then join West Virginia Public Broadcasting for a #WhyListen: First Listen Music Party on Sunday, August 28 from 4 to 6 p.m at Town Run Brewing Company in Shepherdstown.

Melissa Stillwell Photography

Since the show began almost two years ago, A Change of Tune has highlighted some of the best up-and-coming artists out of these West Virginia hills with podcast-y chats ranging from Tyler Childers to Ona, Bud Carroll to Coyotes in Boxes and beyond.

But those interviews have been a bit infrequent, and since West Virginia Day was this month (and with A Change of Tune’s second birthday on the horizon), we thought we’d do something special: 30 days, 30 brand new #WVmusic interviews that range from Morgantown alt-rockers and Parkersburg singer-songwriters to West Virginia music venues and regional artist management and beyond, all of which contribute to this state’s wild and wonderful music scene.

Most Exalted

Since the show began almost two years ago, A Change of Tune has highlighted some of the best up-and-coming artists out of these West Virginia hills with podcast-y chats ranging from Tyler Childers to Ona, Bud Carroll to Coyotes in Boxes and beyond.

But those interviews have been a bit infrequent, and since West Virginia Day was this month (and with A Change of Tune’s second birthday on the horizon), we thought we’d do something special: 30 days, 30 brand new #WVmusic interviews that range from Morgantown alt-rockers and Parkersburg singer-songwriters to West Virginia music venues and regional artist management and beyond, all of which contribute to this state’s wild and wonderful music scene.

Josh Nibert

Since the show began almost two years ago, A Change of Tune has highlighted some of the best up-and-coming artists out of these West Virginia hills with podcast-y chats ranging from Ona to Qiet, Sean Richardson to Jordan Andrew Jefferson and beyond.

But those interviews have been a bit infrequent, and since West Virginia Day was this month (and with A Change of Tune’s second birthday on the horizon), we thought we’d do something special: 30 days, 30 brand new #WVmusic interviews that range from Morgantown alt-rockers and Parkersburg singer-songwriters to West Virginia music venues and regional artist management and beyond, all of which contribute to this state’s wild and wonderful music scene.

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