West Virginia

Bettman/Corbis / NPR

In this episode, we'll hear reactions to Obama's proposed tax credits and other funding for Appalachia. And we'll talk with documentary filmmaker John Nakashima, whose new film, "The First 1000 Days," explores the effects of poverty on young children.

 

We'll also take a look back at how the lessons from the War on Poverty could shine light on present day economic development efforts.

Brynn Kusic

Racism and homophobia, love and tolerance--none of these are new to Appalachia. Today, we explore the stories of Appalachians who are moved to spread love, not hate.

In West Virginia, a racist hate crime shakes a community to spread a message of tolerance.

And a Kentucky songwriter’s high lonesome tune is inspired by a gay coal miner’s true story.

Steven Middleton

This week's episode features Elizabeth Wells McIlvain helps employ 1,000 people in West Virginia, making Fiesta ware.And we learn that the number of jobs created by the Kentucky Bourbon Distillery industry has doubled in the last two years. We'll also explore some eccentric roadside attractions, including a Ventriloquist museum in Fort Mitchell, Kentucky.

Forest Wander / Creative Commons/www.forestwander.com

West Virginia was named the 15th safest state in the US for settling down and raising a family. According to a blog from the SafeWise.com website, West Virginia is one of the safest places to live in America coming in at number 15.

Rhode Island Senator to Visit W. Va. on Wednesday

Oct 21, 2014

As a part of their agreement to visit each other’s states, U.S. Senator Joe Manchin (D-W.Va.) will host Senator Sheldon Whitehouse (D-RI) in West Virginia on Wednesday, October 22 to demonstrate West Virginia’s ability to utilize diverse energy resources. Senator Manchin will emphasize the importance of investing in the technology needed to provide cleaner power while also ensuring reliable and affordable electricity throughout the United States.

Lauren Stonestreet, of Elle Effect Photography

 

In this episode, we’ll travel to Maryland to forage- and eat- wild Pawpaws

And we’ll learn about Anne Braden, one of the early advocates for social equality in Kentucky.

We'll also hear about a new company in West Virginia that’s revived a historic salt-works -and why chefs are loving it.

Jim Lange

Symphony of Ideas: SEPTEMBER 25 at 12:15pm & OCTOBER 2 at 8pm. 2 hours.

Symphony of Ideas, a collaboration between WV Public Radio and the WV Symphony Orchestra returns this Thursday with a brand new program with many West Virginia connections.

Roxy Todd

Composer and Huntington native Nate May recently finished production on an original two-person music-drama, called Dust in the Bottomland.

Shawn Brackbill

This week, "A Change of Tune" host Joni Deutsch interviews Yeasayer co-founder Anand Wilder about his indie Appalachian musical “Break Line." The record features musicians from major indie/alt bands like Chairlift, MGMT, and Vampire Weekend, and the musical itself is inspired by West Virginia’s coal mining past. If you’re a fan of indie rock collaborations and classic rock operas, this interview is recommended for you.

Cecelia Mason / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

As the climate changes, scientists around the world are trying to figure out how plants, animals and even people will be affected. One scientist in West Virginia is conducting an experiment to find out how well a fish native to Appalachian streams might survive.

Biologist Than Hitt works at the U.S. Geological Survey Leetown Science Center in Jefferson County, West Virginia, where scientists explore everything from declining fish and mussel populations to the increasing presence of intersex fish in the nation’s waterways. Hitt has just started a new research project: trying to determine how climate change might affect the brook trout.

The Law Works - War on Coal

Jun 12, 2014

For the past few years the United States has been involved in war with a rock. The rock in question is coal. And just like any civil war the participants on both sides are from the same country, this one. The United States. Dan Ringer and guest Patrick McGinley will talk about the War on Coal on this episode of The Law Works.

The Law Works - State Budget

May 30, 2014

Do you have a budget? How do you create it? Is it easy to follow? The State of West Virginia has a budget. It is not easy to create, and it is not easy to follow.  Dan Ringer and guest State Senator Roman Prezioso, Chair of the West Virginia State Senate Finance Committee will talk about the West Virginia State Budget on this episode of The Law Works.

The Law Works - Stream Mitigation

May 28, 2014
Ben Adducchio / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

It's dark. It's damp. It's your basement, or crawl space. And for some people in Clarksburg, it's a labor of love to go down there and find ways to improve energy efficiency.

Basement Systems of West Virginia does work to improve the energy efficiency of homes by encapsulating crawl spaces. That means they take materials, similar to pool liner, and other things to create what they call “clean spaces.”

It’s their hope to improve conditioning and energy efficiency in these dim, dark places.

The Law Works - Challenges facing the Courts

Apr 1, 2014

We live in a complex world. We deal with new challenges every day. New technologies. New relationships. New ideas. And so do our courts. Dan Ringer and former West Virginia Supreme Court Chief Justice Richard Neely will talk about the challenges facing our courts, on this episode of The Law Works.

Nearly 800 people were on Marshall’s campus this weekend for the Appalachian Studies Conference.

The three-day conference marked the 37th time the organization has got together to discuss the ins and outs of what makes Appalachia, Appalachia. Tyler Hughes made the trip from East Tennessee State University to attend.

The Law Works - Heroin and Methamphetamine

Mar 21, 2014

The Law Works - Truancy

Feb 27, 2014

Forty years ago, the United States had the highest public school graduation rate in the world.  Today we're number twenty-one.  In West Virginia we have a public school truancy rate of up to fifty percent in some counties.  Dan Ringer and his guests Judge Alan Moats, Barbour & Taylor Counties and Glenn Sweet, Director, Barbour County Office of Attendance will talk about Truancy.

Ben Adducchio / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Scores of environmental regulators, lawyers, and other interested parties discussed what they will be facing when the Environmental Protection Agency releases its new rules on existing coal fired power plants later this year.

Lawyers are concerned with the possibility of excessive amounts of litigation over the issue, and some hope coal-rich states like West Virginia are given a great deal of flexibility to implement changes.

Leigh Hall

A  truckload of water was delivered to a school in Wyoming County Monday morning. The school and several communities served by Alpoca Water Works have been without usable water for almost five months.

Last week, we brought you the story about Herndon Consolidated and the surrounding communities.

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