West Virginia Board of Education

On West Virginia Morning, Democrats in the U.S. Senate walked out of a subcommittee meeting yesterday to protest legislation meant to counteract the Clean Power Plan.  Also, leaders in the state legislature want to rescind the agreement that brought the Common Core education standards to West Virginia.  These stories on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Radio news – telling West Virginia’s story.


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A judge has reprimanded an attorney for ousted state schools superintendent Jorea Marple for using profanity and calling the West Virginia Board of Education's lawyers "crooks."

The Charleston Gazette-Mail reports that Kanawha Circuit Court Judge James Stucky also ordered attorney Tim Barber to pay court costs incurred by the board's lawyers in pursuing the sanctions. A lawyer for the board estimated those costs at $2,500 to $3,000.

Ashton Marra / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

The West Virginia Board of Education has a new president in retired Morgantown businessman Mike Green, but his nomination and subsequent election Thursday came with a small spark of controversy.

Green, the board’s current Vice President, replaces former First Lady Gayle Manchin as the body’s leader. Manchin completed her second term as board president Thursday, holding the post since July 2013. Her nine year term as a member of the board expires in November.

Green will be joined at the head of the table by former state Sen. Lloyd Jackson who was elected Vice President and Tina Combs who was re-elected to her seat as Secretary.


On West Virginia Morning, everyone will have a chance to review and comment on the state’s education standards on a new website.  Ashton Marra has that story.  And Liz McCormick reports on the All Good Music Festival which is returning to West Virginia today.  These stories on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Radio news – telling West Virginia’s story.


On West Virginia Morning, Ashton Marra reports from the state board of education meeting where members continue to react to Republican lawmakers call to repeal Common Core education standards.  And we’ll visit a farm in Garrett County, Maryland that uses traditional farming methods.  These stories on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting – telling West Virginia’s story.


June 8, 2004: Judge Elizabeth Hallanan Dies at 79

Jun 8, 2015
e-wv, The West Virginia Encyclopedia

Judge Elizabeth Hallanan died on June 8, 2004. She was 79 years old.

Hallanan was born in Charleston in 1925. After attending Morris Harvey College—now the University of Charleston—she earned a law degree from West Virginia University. In the mid-1950s, she served on the State Board of Education and in the House of Delegates before being appointed assistant commissioner of public institutions by Governor Cecil Underwood. In 1959, she became judge of the first full-time juvenile court in Kanawha County, making her the first woman judge of a court of record in West Virginia history.

West Virginia Board of Education

On Wednesday, members of the West Virginia Board of Education traveled to Frankfort, Kentucky, to meet with their education counterparts and watch as the Kentucky BOE conducted their monthly meeting. Thursday West Virginia Board President Gayle Manchin said the two states have plenty in common.

It starts with standards. Kentucky and West Virginia are just two of forty four states that have adopted the national Common Core Standards, but in West Virginia, those standards were adapted to fit the state’s needs and titled the Next Generation Standards.

Then there’s economics. In eastern Kentucky especially where coal mining is a major part of the economy, the state is suffering the same economic downturn as West Virginia in the energy sector, but there’s much more according to Manchin.

The West Virginia Board of Education is close to passing a policy change that would allow year-round sports coaching.

The Charleston Gazette reports the board voted Wednesday to give the public 30 days to comment on the possible change. Current policy allows for only three weeks of out-of-season sports practice or related activities.

On West Virginia Morning, Ashton Marra reports that Governor Tomblin has asked the state board of education to study the viability of the Schools for the Deaf and Blind in Romney.  That story on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting – telling West Virginia’s story.


Ashton Marra / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

“I have promised my children that I will do everything in my power to fix this and I believe that we finally with this bond have a chance to do that.” -Shauna Starks

Fayette County parents like Shauna Starks spoke during the West Virginia Board of Education's April meeting in favor of the county's upcoming $66.5 million bond vote.

On West Virginia Morning, we continue our series “Effective From Passage” with a look at some of the tort reform bills passed by the 2015 legislature.  And Ashton Marra reports from the State Board of Education about science standards and climate change.  These stories on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting – telling West Virginia’s story.

Ashton Marra / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

The West Virginia Board of Education voted 6-2 Thursday to adopt an amended set of science standards for West Virginia schools. The amendments came at the request of Board member and previous Board President Wade Linger.

On West Virginia Morning, Ashton Marra reports from a meeting of the state board of education where members considered requests from county school systems to waive the requirement for 180 days of instruction.  And we’ll re-visit a ramp feed in Richwood, known as the ramp capitol of the world.  These stories on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting – telling West Virginia’s story.


Ashton Marra / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

The West Virginia Board of Education and State Superintendent of Schools have denied the requests of nearly 30 counties to waive their 180 instructional day requirement.

West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin signed two education bills Thursday, one meant to give some teachers a pay raise and another to put some restrictions on the state Board of Education when they take over a county school system.

Electron / wikimedia Commons

The West Virginia Board of Education has approved a measure to eliminate statewide standardized testing in social studies and reducing examinations in science. 

The Charleston Gazette reports that the board approved the measure on Thursday along with several other changes.

While the move will only applies to testing this spring, the board could approve a more permanent reduction in the future.

At the legislature today, the bill to repeal the prevailing wage law isn’t on the senate floor yet, but an attempt to stop it from coming to the floor sparked debate about the measure.  In the house today, delegates adopted an amendment that would require the Governor to appoint two members of the West Virginia Board of Education that have school age children.  These stories and we’ll meet the Majority Leaders on The Legislature Today.

West Virginia Department of Education

  Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin has filled two vacancies on the West Virginia Board of Education.

Tomblin announced the appointments of Dr. James S. Wilson and Beverly E. Kingery on Wednesday in a news release. Their appointments are effective immediately.

Wilson is a dentist who served on the Marshall County school board for 20 years. He replaces Bob Dunlevy, whose term expired Nov. 4, 2014.

One this episode of West Virginia Morning, Governor Tomblin emphasized reaching across the aisle and moving the state forward last night during his state of the state address. And we continue our series on water quality.

  The West Virginia Board of Education has rescinded a proposal on teaching requirements for education science standards on climate change.

The board voted Wednesday to place the proposal back on a 30-day public comment period.

The vote came at the suggestion of Clayton Burch, the Department of Education's chief academic officer. He suggested removing the proposal will ensure that the time is taken to "get it right."

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