U.S. Senate

Scott McCloskey / The Intelligencer and Wheeling News-Register

All six Republican candidates for U.S. Senate squared off Monday night in Wheeling during an hour and a half long debate as they aim for a seat in the U.S. Senate. The candidates made mention of their affinity for President Donald Trump while heavily criticizing Democrat incumbent Joe Manchin.

Trump
Still from White House video

“Why don’t you just fire the guy?”

The question came in a press availability with President Trump soon after he learned that federal agents, acting on information from Special Counsel Robert Mueller, had raided the offices of his personal lawyer, Robert Cohen.

Steve Helber / AP Photo

There's a new fact-checking operation in West Virginia, and it buries one fact — that it's run by U.S. Senate candidate Don Blankenship's campaign.

Former Massey CEO and West Virginia Republican Senatorial candidate, Don Blankenship, speaks during a town hall to kick off his campaign in Logan, W.Va., Thursday, Jan. 18, 2018.
Steve Helber / Associated Press

A report says the former coal executive convicted of violating federal mine safety standards has failed to turn in a required financial disclosure for his U.S. Senate race.

Jacquelyn Martin / Associated Press

A former coal company CEO who served a one-year prison term on charges related to the deadliest U.S. mine disaster in four decades is kicking off his U.S. Senate campaign with a town hall meeting for voters.

Ex-Massey Energy boss Don Blankenship is scheduled to attend the meeting Thursday night at the Chief Logan Lodge, Hotel and Conference Center in Logan. Blankenship has said he wants to tell voters why he's the best candidate. A news conference is planned afterward.

Jacquelyn Martin / Associated Press

Former Massey Energy CEO Don Blankenship is hosting a town hall meeting for voters next week as he revs up his candidacy for the U.S. Senate.

Walter Scriptunas II / AP Photo

Editor's Note: This is a developing story. Please be sure to revisit this post for the latest. This post was last updated Wednesday, November 29, 2017 at 7:22 p.m.

 

Former Massey Energy CEO Don Blankenship is running for U.S. Senate as a Republican. Blankenship served one year in federal prison for conspiring to violate federal mine safety standards in the wake of an explosion that killed 29 miners in April 2010.

West Virginia Attorney General's Office

West Virginia Attorney General Patrick Morrisey is stepping down as chairman of the national organization of Republican attorneys general.

C-SPAN 2

U.S. Sen. Joe Manchin, running for re-election next year, says his campaign raised more than $1.4 million in the most recent quarter and has nearly $3.5 million on hand.

The Democrat, seeking a second, full six-year term, says Thursday that the total includes $250,000 in contributions from West Virginians in June.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, most of the state’s trees are harvested by small-scale logging operations, like the one owned by Scotty Cook in Elkins.  

Producer Jean Snedegar joins Cook on his latest job in a remote area of southern Randolph County.  

Liz McCormick / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

With 15 months to go until Election Day, yet another candidate has added his name to the list of those vying for Democrat Joe Manchin's seat in the U.S. Senate.

John Raby / AP Photo

West Virginia's Republican Attorney General Patrick Morrisey has scheduled a political event Monday where he's expected to announce his candidacy for the U.S. Senate seat now held by Democrat Joe Manchin.

e-wv, The West Virginia Encyclopedia / via West Virginia & Regional History Collection

On April 14, 1875, Hallie Davis married Stephen Elkins, bringing together two powerful political families. Hallie Davis was the eldest child of Henry Gassaway Davis, a U.S. senator and one of West Virginia’s richest men. She grew up primarily in the Mineral County town of Piedmont and in Frederick, Maryland. When she met Stephen Elkins, he was serving as a delegate to Congress from the New Mexico Territory. They later lived in Washington and New York.

June 18, 1937: John D. Rockefeller IV Born in New York City

Jun 18, 2015
Office of Jay Rockefeller

  John D. Rockefeller IV was born in New York City on June 18, 1937, just weeks after the death of his great-grandfather, business tycoon John D. Rockefeller. Jay—as the wealthy Rockefeller heir was known—first came to West Virginia as a poverty volunteer in the 1960s. He soon attracted national attention by switching his party affiliation from Republican to Democrat. He was elected to the West Virginia House of Delegates in 1966 and as secretary of state two years later.

Shelley Moore Capito and Joe Manchin joined four other U.S. senators to unveil new legislation aimed at pushing back on proposed federal clean air regulations.

 

Standing beside four other Republican senators and Democrat Joe Manchin, Shelley Moore Capito introduced the The Affordable Reliable Energy Now Act on Wednesday, May 13, at a press conference in Washington, D.C. 

  

On May 13, 1941, Fairmont State College President Joseph Rosier was seated in the U.S. Senate, ending one of the state’s most bizarre political tussles. He was succeeding Democratic powerbroker Matthew Neely, who’d stepped down as senator to become West Virginia’s 21st governor.

U.S. National Archives and Records Administration

  State founder Peter G. Van Winkle died in Parkersburg on April 15, 1872, at age 63. The native of New York City had moved to Parkersburg in 1835 to practice law. Through his wife’s family, he became a key player in the region’s oil industry. He also helped organize and serve as president of the Northwestern Virginia Railroad.

The first woman to represent West Virginia in the U.S. Senate gave her inaugural floor speech today Tuesday, March 10. Energy policy was a big part of Republican Sen. Shelley Moore Capito’s address. 

Capito said she will focus on improving the state’s roads, broadband access and health care for veterans and children during her time in the Senate. But during her 15-minute speech, U.S. energy policy became a real point of emphasis. 

U.S. Senator Jay Rockefeller delivered his farewell address on the floor Thursday. You can view the entire speech below: 

A transcript of the speech as prepared for delivery is also available below: 

Exit polling data from MSNBC reveals quite a lot about the motivation of voters in the Capito-Tennant race for U.S. Senate. For example, 47 percent of voters polled say their vote "expressed opposition" to President Obama, with 90 percent of those voters punching the ticket for Capito.

Roxy Todd / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

A mere seconds after the polls closed across the state, national media outlets began calling the U.S. Senate race in favor of Republican Congresswoman Shelley Moore Capito.

The seat is being vacated by long-time Democratic Sen. Jay Rockefeller who announced his retirement last year.

Rep. Shelley Moore Capito, R-W.Va., says that the current decline in coal-related employment is caused by many factors. But she says as a U.S. Senator, she would focus on the one she believes she can influence: environmental regulations.

In an interview with West Virginia Public Broadcasting, the candidate for U.S. Senate said the decline in coal jobs was caused by three things:

Sam Sepeciale / The Charleston Daily Mail

Secretary of State Natalie Tennant may have violated state law on Wednesday as she led a group to the Kanawha County Voter Registration office for early voting.

According to Kanawha County Clerk Vera McCormick, Tennant led a group of about 30 supporters to the courthouse Wednesday morning. She says members of the group cheered for Tennant for a brief moment and Tennant thanked them for their support. They then went inside to cast their ballots. 

State law prohibits any campaigning on the property of the county courthouse, any annex facilities or any other designated early voting locations. 

Tennant is running for the U.S. Senate seat soon to be vacated by retiring Sen. Jay Rockefeller.

West Virginia Public Broadcasting is hosting a second debate for the candidates running for U.S. Senate and wants to know, what do you want to hear from them?

Submit your questions to us by the morning of Thursday, October 16, and we'll choose some to ask the candidates Friday morning.

The debate itself will air Friday evening from 7-8pm on West Virginia Public Broadcasting and West Virginia Public Radio. All of the candidates on the ballot have been invited to participate.

  In rival U.S. Senate bids, Republican Shelley Moore Capito raised $1.6 million last quarter and still has $3.4 million in the bank, while Democrat Natalie Tennant brought in almost $1 million and has $1.1 million in her campaign account.

Capito takes the 3-to-1 cash edge into the race's homestretch, as the Nov. 4 election approaches.

With plenty of TV advertising, the two had a high-spending quarter.

When voters take to the polling place this November, they'll decide between five candidates vying for Sen. Jay Rockefeller's seat in the U.S. Senate. Most will recognize the names 'Tennant' and 'Capito,' but what about Baber, Buckley, and Hudok?

The three third party candidates for Senate, Bob Henry Baber of the Mountain Party, John Buckley of the Libertarian Party and Phil Hudok of the Constitution Party, talk about what they have to offer West Virginians when representing them at the federal level. 

  The National Rifle Association is putting almost $218,000 toward ads opposing Democrat Natalie Tennant's bid for U.S. Senate.

Federal election records show the NRA's Political Victory Fund bought radio and Internet ad space last week.

Earlier this month, the NRA endorsed Republican Shelley Moore Capito against Tennant. The NRA also bought almost $44,000 in pro-Capito mailings.

Republican Shelley Moore Capito and Democrat Natalie Tennant will square off in a live televised debate for West Virginia's open U.S. Senate seat.

The two hopefuls will meet Oct. 7 in Charleston for the race's first announced debate. The West Virginia Press Association, West Virginia Public Broadcasting and AARP are organizing the event.

Capito, a seventh-term congresswoman, announced Thursday she would participate. Tennant, West Virginia's secretary of state, confirmed her participation in June.

Jessica Lilly

 A retired coal miner who suffers from black lung disease has urged Congress to help clear a backlog of claims of fellow miners who have the disease. Princeton native Robert Bailey testified at the U.S. Senate Subcommittee on Employment and Workplace hosted a hearing Tuesday. The hearing focused on the struggles miners face while seeking black lung benefits. Lawmakers say the testimony on Capitol Hill was meant to do three things:

Sen. Jay Rockefeller
Politico

At a hearing about health care reform earlier this week, Sen. Jay Rockefeller said that legislation is stalled and progress is not being made in Congress because some people think President Obama is he wrong color.

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