U.S. House of Representatives

May 8, 1892: U.S. and Confederate Congressman Alexander Boteler Dies

May 8, 2017
 Alexander Boteler
E-WV / WV Humanities Council

U.S. and Confederate Congressman Alexander Boteler died on May 8, 1892, shortly before his 77th birthday. Before launching his political career, Boteler was a farmer and the owner of a hydraulic cement plant on the Potomac River at Shepherdstown. He entered the U.S. House of Representatives as a Whig in 1859. That same year, he interviewed John Brown extensively after Brown’s raid on Harpers Ferry. A skilled artist, Boteler also made a sketch of the imprisoned abolitionist.

Sarah Lowther Hensley / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

West Virginia’s representatives gave their support to a U.S. House bill that authorizes spending up to $325 billion on transportation projects during the next six years.

After three days of debate and some 100 amendments considered, House Resolution 3763, the Surface Transportation Reauthorization and Reform Act of 2015, passed on a vote of 363 to 64. The bill approves more than $300 billion in spending on the country’s transportation projects. It includes $261 billion for roads and bridges.

Glynis Board / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Congressman David McKinley's re-election Tuesday evening came as no surprise to most who have been following the 1st Congressional District race. His opponent, Democratic state Auditor Glen Gainer, was often criticized for running a quiet race, one he called "truly grassroots."

By the end of the night, results showed McKinley winning with 64 percent of the vote, but he spoke to supporters in Morgantown shortly after the polls closed.

Simone Ramella / flickr.com/photos/ramella/

Booking tickets with airlines rarely ever seems to be an enjoyable process. A bill in the House of Representatives would change that, but whether it’ll make it better or worse depends on who you ask.

The debate is over HR 4156, which has made it through its single committee reference and is expected to receive a vote by the full chamber in the coming weeks.

The bill is just four pages long, but don’t let that fool you. If passed, it could completely change the way you purchase airline tickets.