U.S. Chemical Safety Board

Barbour County
David Benbennick / wikimedia commons

The lead federal investigator examining the explosion that killed two men at a West Virginia industrial plant May 24 says they're still testing and gathering evidence to determine the what caused the approximately 100-gallon tank to blow apart.

Mark Wingard with the U.S. Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board says Friday that one possible scenario is some type for chemical reaction that violently caused an increase in pressure or heat or both.

Barbour County
David Benbennick / wikimedia commons

An independent national agency is joining investigations into this week's explosion at a West Virginia industrial plant that left the owner and an employee dead.

The U.S. Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board examines the root causes of chemical incidents.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

The U.S. Chemical Safety Board approved recommendations last night that were the result of an investigation into a 2014 Charleston chemical leak. 

The leak spurred a tap water ban for more than 300,000 West Virginians. Before the vote, the board heard directly from members of the public who were affected by the leak. 

Dave Mistich / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

The Chemical Safety Board voted Wednesday evening to approve the final report and recommendations that were the result of a more than two and a half year investigation into a Charleston chemical leak.

The leak, which was discovered January 9, 2014, spurred a tap water ban for more than 300, 000 West Virginians for as many as ten days.

Ashton Marra / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Investigators from the U. S. Chemical Safety Board presented preliminary findings Wednesday from their investigation into the January chemical leak at Freedom Industries in Charleston.

Lead Investigator Johnnie Banks explained the process they’ve gone through collecting evidence and information and said they will soon begin to analyze that data to put together a final report and recommendations.

  The federal Chemical Safety Board is coming to Charleston next week to release findings about a New Cumberland metal recycling plant explosion that killed three workers in December 2010.

The board said Thursday that it also will update the public on its investigation of a January chemical spill at the July 16 meeting. The Freedom Industries tank leak contaminated drinking in the Kanawha Valley for days.

The federal Chemical Safety Board is coming to Charleston to release findings about a New Cumberland metal recycling plant explosion that killed three workers in December 2010.

At the July 16 meeting, the board will also update the public on its investigation of a January chemical spill. The Freedom Industries tank leak contaminated drinking for 300,000 people for days.

@chemsafetyboard / Twitter

Tanks at the facility that spilled chemicals into 300,000 West Virginians' water supply were deemed out of federal compliance three months before the leak.
 
     U.S. Chemical Safety Board Chairman Rafael Moure-Eraso told a congressional panel Monday that Freedom Industries ordered its own review of its tanks last October.

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Transcript

BRIAN NAYLOR, BYLINE: I'm Brian Naylor in Washington.

Ashton Marra

The Joint Legislative Oversight Commission on State Water Resources held its third hearing related to the Kanawha Valley chemical leak Friday, receiving testimony for the first time from those conducting the on-site investigation.

Chairman of the U.S. Chemical Safety Board Rafael Moure-Eraso explained his team of four investigators is in the preliminary phases in an investigation that could take up to a year to complete.

As Ken Ward of The Charleston Gazette reports, officials with the U.S. Chemical Safety Board say a product known as "PPH" was included in the the January 9 spill.

Rockefeller's Bills Would Make Polluters Pay

Jan 17, 2014
AP

A week after Freedom Industries spilled chemical into the Elk River and tainted the water supply for more than 300,000 West Virginians, Sen. Jay Rockefeller, D-WV,  has introduced a pair of bills to make those responsible pay.

Rockefeller's bills would not only make those responsible for a chemical spill pay for its cleanup, they'd provide more funding for states and agencies tasked with cleanup.

Rockefeller co-sponsored the bills with Senator Brian Schatz, D-Hawaii,  who is responding to a 233,000-gallon molasses spill that occurred in Honolulu last year.

C.W Sigman

The U.S. Chemical Safety Board says it will investigate a chemical spill in the Elk River that has contaminated the public water supply in nine counties.
 
     Board chairman Rafael Moure-Eraso said Saturday that the board wants to find out how a leak of such magnitude occurred, and how to prevent similar incidents in the future.