Trey Kay

American Friends Service Committee South Region

High-profile confrontations between African-Americans and police officers have fueled tensions across the country. West Virginia is NOT a place where people are comfortable talking about these things.

But in Trey's hometown of Charleston, some of the key players are now bringing this tension out into the open.

Trey Kay

Two rivers run through Charleston, West Virginia. While most of the city is situated on the Kanawha, it’s the Elk River that demarcates the West Side from the governmental and business center of Charleston. Today, the West Side is the poorest neighborhood in Charleston.

At a time when the President of the United States questions the patriotism of African American football players protesting social injustice, we present the civil rights struggle of another African American who, nearly 50 years ago, broke a color barrier in the NFL — James "Shack" Harris, the first black player in NFL history to earn a job as starting quarterback.

Kenneth King Collection, West Virginia State Archives

The "Us & Them" podcast is about seeing the same story two ways… and nothing calls out for that treatment more than coal in West Virginia.

Scott Threlkeld/AP

The tragedy in Charlottesville, VA makes us wonder if it’s possible to reconcile different versions of history. This episode features two American foreign correspondents of color who’ve sought to answer this quandary, flying from Kenya to Louisiana to report on protests over the dismantling of Confederate monuments.

When conservatives and liberals fight about school curriculum, the disagreements aren’t just about science and history. Even math has been a battleground in the culture wars. 

Sunday dinner is a big deal in Deanna McKinney’s family. Deanna’s a de facto mom to her three sisters and two brothers -- when she moved to West Virginia from New York City, they came too.  These Sunday dinners are to remind the siblings that someone’s always got their back.

Deanna’s told the story of her son’s murder so many times, that she can recount it to me -- a relative stranger with a microphone -- while she picks out cornbread mix at the grocery store. His name was Tymel and his senseless death is an experience that has defined her life and informed who she is.

Us & Them: Amazing Grace

Jul 13, 2017

Everyone knows the song "Amazing Grace." People who don’t even consider themselves spiritual or religious find it meaningful. And while John Newton penned the hymn to connect with Christians, it has transcended that and become a folk song and an anthem for civil rights. But the origins of the song are just a bit more complicated...

Us & Them

Not that long ago, you could get locked up for being gay. 

Us & Them

 

"I know there’s a risk. There are people who are going to hear this and they are going to change the way they feel about me. They are going to make assumptions about me. They’re going to automatically label me with certain words, the common narratives about Donald Trump [like he] hates women, hates immigrants, and so on. And they are going to assume that I am the same in that regard... and that’s a danger."

Reporting from America’s cultural divide, this is the Us & Them podcast from West Virginia Public Broadcasting.

Over the past few years, we’ve noticed that some Americans take offense when people say “Happy Holidays” as opposed to “Merry Christmas.” A here’s a clip from an episode we call “War On Christmas… Really?”

From West Virginia Public Broadcasting, this is “Us and Them,” the podcast where we tell stories from America’s cultural divides.

Us & Them

"I think the only way to have useful conversations across these intense differences is to be able to just tolerate the other person’s position, but not have an agenda about changing them."

The 2016 presidential campaign was one of the most brutal in America’s history. "Us & Them" host Trey Kay was stunned by the outcome and is trying understand what the whole thing means. Are truth and bitter reality the new Us? Have our news sources become Them?

Something has shifted in the way our society thinks about heroin addicts these days. Could it be that smack users are seeming more like “us” and less like “them?”

From West Virginia Public Broadcasting and PRX, this is "Us & Them," the podcast where we tell the stories about America's cultural divides.

In this episode, I reconnect with Dimitri Mugianis, a friend that I met nearly a quarter century ago when we were both playing in the New York City music scene. He was the front man of a fantastic band called “Leisure Class.”  Dimitri was a dynamic performer, charismatic, poetically eloquent and brimming with the energy of a possessed mad man.  He also had a pernicious heroin addiction.

Charleston Newspapers

What should children learn in school? It’s a question that’s stirred debate for decades, and in 1974 it led to violent protests in West Virginia. People planted bombs in schools, shot at buses, and shut down coal mines. This week on Inside Appalachia, we feature Charleston native Trey Kay, the host of Us and Them.

At a time when West Virginia’s GOP legislators are maneuvering to resend the state’s obligation to use Common Core Curricular Standards for reading and math,  Beth Vorhees speaks with Trey Kay, host of WVPB’s Us & Them podcast about his latest program about New Math.  

New Math was a method for teaching math introduced into public schools in the late 1950s and 1960s – a curricular answer to the Cold War fears of American intellectual inadequacy. In the age of Sputnik and increasingly sophisticated technological systems and machines, math class came to be viewed as a crucial component of the education of intelligent, virtuous citizens who would be able to compete on a global scale. New Math ultimately became a political football used in culture war battles over education.

The appropriate balance of religion in American public education is something that’s been debated since Horace Mann initiated the first public schools in the 1800s.  In the most recent episode of Us & Them, host Trey Kay hears from Linda K. Wertheimer, author of Faith Ed: Teaching About Religion In an Age of Intolerance

In the 1970s, Wertheimer was a 9-year-old student from the only Jewish family in a small Ohio town.  She was confused and felt very uncomfortable when the “Church Lady” would appear in her class each week to have the kids sing “Yes, Jesus Loves Me.”  Linda was the only kid who didn’t know the words to the song. 

Trey spoke with Beth Vorhees about America’s tense history in addressing religion in public school classrooms.


Logo courtesy of Mark Lerner

Us & Them host Trey Kay tackles two big issues on the latest episode of the podcast this week: evolution and climate change. And while those issues are obviously divisive, Trey explores a new twist in the battle over these topics.

There are those out there willing to give thousands of dollars to anyone able to disprove their theories. 

Trey spoke with Beth Vorhees about the new episode and how money gets involved in the debates over these topics.

Adults Could Use Some Sex Education

Jun 15, 2015
West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On West Virginia Morning, Glynis Board reports on how the state can meet the federal EPA’s proposed Clean Power Plan.  And Beth Vorhees talks with Trey Kay about his a new episode of his podcast “Us & Them” that’s available today.  These stories on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting – telling West Virginia’s story.


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