Small Business

Aravind Sivaraj / wikimedia Commons

Imagine you go to pull your social security card or driver's license out of your wallet, and instead find a note demanding money for its return. The digital version of that scenario played out in one business owner's computer.

Ryan Whittington owns and operates Club K-9, a dog-boarding facility in South Charleston. He was blind-sided by the Cryptolocker virus, which is a type of malicious software broadly known as ransomware.

At the legislature today, there was some intense debate on the house floor as lawmakers took up two bills that are priorities for the new majority. Also at the Capitol, labor unions rally against a Senate bill repealing the state's prevailing wage. And West Virignia's craft beer makers are seeking some regulatory relief. They have the backing of Governor Tomblin, but what do lawmakers think of the industry? We'll meet the chairs of the small business committees to find out on The Legislature Today.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Judiciary chairs Sen. Charles Trump (R) Morgan County and Del. John Shott (R) Mercer County discuss tort reform, non-partisan election of judges and other issues on West Virginia Morning. 

Jesse Wright / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Owning a business is a dream many people have, but it’s not always easy to start it up and keep it going. Delegates met last week to discuss the future of small businesses in the state.

  At the legislature today, a senator from Greenbrier County gave his colleagues an update on the water situation in his district.  A diesel fuel spill has fouled the drinking water for thousands of residents there.  And we’ll sit in on a meeting of the House Committee on Small Business, Entrepreneurship and Economic Development to hear how the state assists small business owners.  Also we’ll meet the new chairs of the judiciary committees.

Roxy Todd

On a sultry summer evening, three women are killing harlequin beetles in an effort to save the greens at the SAGE micro-farm on Rebecca Street that they landscaped themselves.

Last year, Kathy Moore, Jenny Totten and Meg Reishman completed 18 agriculture and business classes through SAGE, which stands for Sustainable Agricultural Entrepreneurs. Kathy says she loves getting to take home an unlimited supply of fresh vegetables each week.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

The City of Huntington looks to spur small business opportunities with their Be Small, Live Large initiative. We begin a series on what it takes to keep young West Virginians in the state despite expected population decline. Also, food writer Fred Sauceman talks about his new book, Buttermilk and Bible Burgers: More Stories from the Kitchens of Appalachia.

Martin Valent / WV Legislative Photography

The House’s bill to aide small businesses during states of emergency saw significant changes in the Senate Wednesday, giving lawmakers more control of the aide program.

The original West Virginia Small Business Emergency Act included a laundry list of potential aide written into emergency rule by the director of the Department of Homeland Security and approved by the governor

U.S. Senator Joe Manchin joins Governor Earl Ray Tomblin and other state legislative leaders to discuss proposed state and federal legislation following the January 9th chemical spill, the Senate expresses concerns over the small business recovery bill passed by the House last week, the House passes a bill to increase penalties for littering, and Finance Chairs Sen. Roman Prezioso and Del. Brent Boggs discuss various aspects of the state's finances.

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The House of Delegates passes HB 4175, which would provide funding to small businesses in the wake an emergency, Senate Majority Leader John Unger introduces a bill that would require above ground storage facilities of chemicals to be inspected, Attorney General Patrick Morrisey faces off with the Senate Finance Committee over abortion in a budget hearing, and Minority Leaders Sen. Mike Hall and Del. Tim Armstead speak about issues important to their party this session.

Dave Mistich / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

House Bill 4175 was introduced yesterday and sent to the new Committee on Small Business, Entrepreneurship and Economic Development. The committee approved the bill to be sent to the finance committee, which today approved it to be sent to the floor. The delegates voted unanimously to suspend the second and third readings of the bill to allow immediate action.

As the water ban was lifted throughout the Charleston area yesterday restaurants and bars started to open their doors for the first time since Thursday.

Deno Stanley is the owner of Adelphia Sports Bar and Grille in downtown Charleston. He said when he received word last Thursday that he would have to close because of the water ban he was not happy.

Brian Blauser

Before a newly formed legislative committee begins to meet, Speaker of the House Tim Miley and a group of legislators plan a tour around the state to learn from small business owners and entrepreneurs, members of the Cabell County Board of Education tour the new Huntington East Middle School before it opens in January, Book Lovers of Charleston celebrate 90 years, and The Steep Canyon Rangers perform "Tell The Ones I Love" on this Mountain Stage song of the week.

Ashton Marra

In his first press conference as Speaker of the state House of Delegates, Speaker Tim Miley announced the intended formation of a new committee in his chamber, the committee on small business, entrepreneurship and economic development.

The committee will be separated from the one already in existence in the House which is focused on the energy industry and labor. Miley said this new committee is important because small businesses are the backbone of future economic growth in the state.

Growing entrepreneurship. That was the focus of the Appalachian Regional Commission’s annual conference in Charleston.

Members from the 13 Appalachian states shared their experiences and ideas on how to create an environment that will encourage entrepreneurs to start or grow their businesses into the future, but many agreed it starts with education.