Shepherdstown

May 8, 1892: U.S. and Confederate Congressman Alexander Boteler Dies

May 8, 2018
 Alexander Boteler
E-WV / WV Humanities Council

U.S. and Confederate Congressman Alexander Boteler died on May 8, 1892, shortly before his 77th birthday. Before launching his political career, Boteler was a farmer and the owner of a hydraulic cement plant on the Potomac River at Shepherdstown. He entered the U.S. House of Representatives as a Whig in 1859. That same year, he interviewed John Brown extensively after Brown’s raid on Harpers Ferry. A skilled artist, Boteler also made a sketch of the imprisoned abolitionist.

Aneesh Sompalli (center) speaking at a Gereration West Virginia event in Shepherdstown.
Liz McCormick / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Generation West Virginia’s local Eastern Panhandle chapter hosted a panel discussion at Shepherd University Thursday night with four young locals who decided to stay in West Virginia to build their careers.

Unemployment Line
Matt Rourke / Associated Press

 


Several organizations throughout Appalachia will see federal grant money. Funds are designed to help strengthen coal-impacted economies.

 

The Appalachian Regional Commission announced nearly $2 million additional dollars this week for regions in Appalachia that have been affected by job losses related to the declining coal industry.

 

E-WV / WV Humanities Council

On September 5, 1716, Virginia Lieutenant Governor Alexander Spotswood and about 50 men reached the crest of the Allegheny Mountains, likely in present Pendleton County, and claimed the land for King George the First of Great Britain.

Spotswood and his men—described as “gentlemen, servants, Indians, and rangers”—journeyed up the Rappahannock River and crossed over the Blue Ridge Mountains into the Shenandoah Valley. Robert Brooke, a member of the expedition and the king’s surveyor general, made the first scientific observations west of the Alleghenies.

Liz McCormick / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

It’s nothing unusual to think about leaving your hometown after you graduate high school, but sometimes it’s not an option to leave, and sometimes, as we’ve heard, leaving can be difficult and expensive, too. The grass isn’t always greener on the other side.

Burns Exposures

"People want something tangible, something they can hold, something of substance. This is one of vinyl's greatest strengths."

May 12, 1971: Nurse Col. Florence Blanchfield Dies at 87

May 12, 2017
 Florence Blanchfield
E-WV / WV Humanities Council

Colonel Florence Blanchfield died in Washington on May 12, 1971, at age 87. She was born in Shepherdstown in 1884, the daughter of a nurse and a stonecutter. After training as a nurse in Pittsburgh and Baltimore, she enlisted in the Army Nurse Corps in 1917 and served in France during World I.

May 8, 1892: U.S. and Confederate Congressman Alexander Boteler Dies

May 8, 2017
 Alexander Boteler
E-WV / WV Humanities Council

U.S. and Confederate Congressman Alexander Boteler died on May 8, 1892, shortly before his 77th birthday. Before launching his political career, Boteler was a farmer and the owner of a hydraulic cement plant on the Potomac River at Shepherdstown. He entered the U.S. House of Representatives as a Whig in 1859. That same year, he interviewed John Brown extensively after Brown’s raid on Harpers Ferry. A skilled artist, Boteler also made a sketch of the imprisoned abolitionist.

On February 1, 1798, publisher Nathaniel Willis shortened his newspaper’s name from the Potowmac Guardian and Berkeley Advertiser to just Potomak Guardian.

  

Why is this paper important? It’s the oldest known newspaper from present West Virginia.

Nathaniel Willis was a native of Boston who’d taken part in the Boston Tea Party and fought in the Revolutionary War. He founded the Potowmac Guardian and Berkeley Advertiser in Shepherdstown in 1790.

Liz McCormick / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Hundreds of protesters gathered across the street from the Bavarian Inn in Shepherdstown Thursday morning as the United States Democratic Senators held their annual retreat inside.

On Thursday morning, Harpers Ferry resident Cheryl Kemp joined some 250 people gathered outside the Bavarian Inn in Shepherdstown. She says she came out because she wants the senators to know they have her support.

Shepherdstown and Romney were both chartered on the same day, the big question still comes down to which one came first.
e-wv, The West Virginia Encyclopedia / WV Humanities Council

On December 23, 1762, the Virginia General Assembly chartered the towns of Romney and Shepherdstown, igniting one of the longest-lasting debates in West Virginia history. The question?  Is Romney or Shepherdstown West Virginia’s oldest incorporated town? 

Shepherd University

Award-winning author Charles Frazier is 2016's Appalachian Heritage Writer-in-Residence at Shepherd University. Frazier was born in Asheville, North Carolina and spent time as a teacher before he published his first novel, Cold Mountain, in 1997.

Shepherdstown, WV
e-WV / WV Humanitites Council

It was the morning of September 19, 1862, and two days after the Battle of Antietam. The bulk of Robert E. Lee’s retreating Confederate Army had already crossed the Potomac River at Shepherdstown.

Lee left behind a rear guard at the Potomac to defend against an anticipated attack from Union General George McClellan.

Lovely Pixels / www.lovelypixels.com

If you're reading this right now, chances are you made it out to last Sunday's #WhyListen First Listen Music Party at Shepherdstown's Town Run Brewing with MiBurg. If you did, we have a new music playlist waiting for you.

Earlier this year, Mountain Stage host, artistic director, and co-founder Larry Groce independently released “Live Forever,” his first full-length recording in over 27 years. Prompted by the encouragement of friends and family, the album is filled with some of Groce’s favorite songs, many of which, have been performed on the storied radio program since its inception in 1983.

Ryan Fischer / The Parthenon

Have you ever wondered what makes a new song into a good song? Or why West Virginia music sounds so different from the rest? Then join West Virginia Public Broadcasting for a #WhyListen: First Listen Music Party on Sunday, August 28 from 4 to 6 p.m at Town Run Brewing Company in Shepherdstown.

Pexels

Restaurants in Martinsburg are now able to sell alcohol before 1 p.m. on Sundays.

The Martinsburg City Council approved a home rule law Thursday night to allow the sale of alcohol at restaurants, wineries, distilleries and private clubs beginning at 10 a.m. on Sundays.

Liz McCormick / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

By now, you may have heard of a new app for smartphones called Pokémon GO. It was released in the United States on July 6 and has taken the country by storm – including West Virginia. There’s a feature in the game that encourages you to visit historic, unique, or touristy spots in the real world, and West Virginia Public Broadcasting has been exploring the interest in this widely popular game.

McMurran Hall at Shepherd University in Shepherdstown
Cecelia Mason / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Shepherd University was awarded almost $50,000 in federal grant money to expand its study abroad program.

Charles Nieman is the Director of International Affairs at Shepherd University. He says this grant from the U.S. Department of State will enhance the school’s study abroad program, switching it from part-time to full-time.

Cecelia Mason / Shepherd University

Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender rights were the topic of a public forum Tuesday morning at Shepherd University. Speakers at the event said West Virginia has come far in accepting LGBT people but not far enough.

Dozens of community members, Shepherd faculty, students, and alumni attended the discussion Tuesday on LGBT rights.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On West Virginia Morning, reporter Liz McCormick has an update on the so-called Brunch Bill that allows county residents to vote on whether to allow restaurants to sell alcohol at 10:00 am on Sundays.  Some cities and towns have found a way around the county wide referendum. 

That story coming up on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting – telling West Virginia’s story.

Liz McCormick / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

It’s been a little more than three months since the state Legislature’s Regular Session came to a close, but there’s one bill that passed that’s still on a lot of people’s minds. That bill is best known as – the Brunch Bill. It calls on county commissions to decide whether to allow the start of alcohol sales at restaurants, wineries, distilleries, and private clubs on Sundays before 1 p.m.

If a commission votes yes by the end of July, then residents in that county get to vote on the issue in November. But there are some towns and cities in the state that don’t want to wait, and they’re finding ways around the legislation.

...like Shepherdstown, West Virginia.

Courtesy of The 29ers

Since the show began almost two years ago, A Change of Tune has highlighted some of the best up-and-coming artists out of these West Virginia hills with podcast-y chats ranging from Bishops to Rozwell Kid, The Sea The Sea to Bud Carroll and beyond.

But those interviews have been a bit infrequent, and since West Virginia Day is coming up (not to mention A Change of Tune’s second birthday), we thought we’d do something special: 30 days, 30 brand new #WVmusic interviews that range from Morgantown alt-rockers and Parkersburg singer-songwriters to West Virginia music venues and regional artist management and beyond, all of which contribute to this state’s wild and wonderful music scene.

Allen Clark Photography

Since the show began almost two years ago, A Change of Tune has highlighted some of the best up-and-coming artists out of these West Virginia hills with podcast-y chats ranging from Bishops to The Sea The Sea, Rozwell Kid to New God and beyond.

But those interviews have been a bit infrequent, and since West Virginia Day is coming up (not to mention A Change of Tune’s second birthday), we thought we’d do something special: 30 days, 30 brand new #WVmusic interviews that range from Morgantown alt-rockers and Parkersburg singer-songwriters to West Virginia music venues and regional artist management and beyond, all of which contribute to this state’s wild and wonderful music scene.

Shepherd University

For the first time in its 144-year history, Shepherd University is being led by a Shepherd graduate.

Mary Hendrix got her Bachelor of Science in pre-med and biology from Shepherd in 1974.

She went on to receive her Ph.D. from George Washington University in Washington, D.C. and was awarded a post-doctoral fellowship to train at Harvard Medical School.

Brunch, Alcohol
MAT HAYWARD / Dollar Photo Club

Restaurants and other businesses in Shepherdstown are now able to serve alcohol on Sunday mornings.

The Shepherdstown Town Council passed an ordinance at a special meeting Thursday moving the start of alcohol sales in food establishments from 1 p.m. to 10 a.m. on Sundays.

Source Water Protection Plans, Water, Shepherdstown, West Virginia Rivers Coalition, WVDEP
Liz McCormick / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

After a chemical spill in the Kanawha Valley left more than 300,000 people with contaminated drinking water for days, state lawmakers passed legislation in an effort to prevent a similar crisis. One part of that legislation requires most water utilities in the state to draft source water protection plans – with public input. West Virginia Public Broadcasting attended a public forum in Shepherdstown Thursday night aimed at educating the community about the plans.

Senator Byrd, Robert C. Byrd, Robert Byrd, Byrd, Exhibit, Shepherd University
Liz McCormick / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

The exhibit titled, "Robert C. Byrd: Senator, Statesman, West Virginian," is a two-year, traveling exhibit featuring the life and legacy of U.S. Senator Robert C. Byrd.

Jody Brumage, the archivist and office manager at Shepherd University’s Robert C. Byrd Center for Congressional History and Education, says this is the first narrative presentation of Byrd’s life and career since his passing in 2010.

Windmill, wind turbine
Liz McCormick / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Shepherd University is teaming up with a wind farm in Greenbrier County to teach students about renewable energies through an internship program.

Shepherd University held a symposium on renewable energy Friday as part of the inauguration of the school’s 16th president, Dr. Mary Hendrix. The symposium featured three speakers Hendrix referred to as “all-star experts” in energy.

Michael Shane Neal / Portrait of United States Senate

A traveling exhibit about the late U.S. Sen. Robert C. Byrd is opening later this month in Shepherdstown.

The exhibit features more than 100 photographs and documents from the archives of the Robert C. Byrd Center for Congressional History and Education at Shepherd University.

It opens with a special event on April 29 at Erma Ora Byrd Hall at Shepherd. The exhibit will tour the state over the next two years, culminating in Charleston in November 2017 in celebration of the centennial of Sen. Byrd's birth.

Pages