Senator Shelley Moore Capito

"I did not come to Washington to hurt people."

That is how Sen. Shelley Moore Capito announced, on Twitter, she would not support the GOP effort to repeal Obamacare without a replacement plan that addresses her concerns "and the needs of West Virginians."

Capito was one of a handful of GOP Senators who dealt the Obamacare repeal a serious blow this week.

Is "Trumpcare" dead? And if so, what does that mean for heathcare in West Virginia, and for Capito's political future. Listen to the Front Porch podcast to find out.

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West Virginia's Republican U.S. Sen. Shelley Moore Capito says she'll review the new Senate Republican leadership proposal to replace the Affordable Care Act but still has "serious concerns" about the Medicaid provisions.

Last week, Congress approved a continuing resolution that will fund the federal government through April 2017. The resolution also extended healthcare benefits for tens of thousands of miners and their families by four months.

Members of Congress spent more than a year debating how to fund both the healthcare and pensions of tens of thousands of miners across the country. The benefits were promised to miners more than 40 years ago by the federal government, but funding for the programs is running out.

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This week on the Front Porch, U.S. Sen. Shelley Moore Capito gives her take on what the new Trump administration means for West Virginia.

We discuss recent resurgence of black lung among coal miners, what comes after the promised repeal of the Affordable Care Act, what can be done to build rural broadband networks, and more.

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A bill to protect health care and pension benefits for about 120,000 retired coal miners would save money over the next decade, according to a new report.

Freedom Industries
AP

President Barack Obama signed the first overhaul of toxic chemical rules in 40 years into law today. West Virginia's Republican senator Shelley Moore Capito and Democratic senator Joe Manchin are applauding the action.

Merrick Garland
Pablo Martinez Monsivais / AP

West Virginia's U.S. Senators are split on how they feel about President Barack Obama's Supreme Court nominee Merrick Garland. The 63-year-old Garland was announced Wednesday as President Obama's choice for the Supreme Court seat left vacant by the late Justice Antonin Scalia.

Senator Shelley Moore Capito is joining U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren and U.S. Rep. Katherine Clark of Massachusetts in teaming to push legislation that would allow patients to request that pharmacists only partially fill opioid prescriptions.

The bill's goal is to help curb the spike in opioid overdose deaths by reducing the number of pills in circulation.

National Governors Association

With President Obama’s visit to Charleston just two short weeks ago, people and organizations across the state have responded to the President’s call to fight drugs and overdose deaths in West Virginia.

On Wednesday, Governor Tomblin continues this fight and travels to Martinsburg to host a summit with law enforcement and the community on substance abuse in the area.

Coal Forum Rally
Dave Mistich / WV Public Broadcasting

Although the motivation for the President’s visit to Charleston was to focus on combating substance abuse around the country, others thought he should be more concerned with the decline in West Virginia’s economy--specifically in the coal industry.  

The West Virginia Coal Forum held a rally Wednesday morning, focusing on Obama and his administration’s stances on energy and emissions.

U.S. Senator Shelley Moore Capito (R-W.Va.) and Michael Botticelli, Director of the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP) met in Morgantown this week to talk about the economic and social effects of drug addiction – opioid addiction especially.


Arch Moore
U.S. Government Printing Office / wikimedia Commons

Former West Virginia Governor Arch A. Moore, Jr. has passed away. He was 91.

His death comes just one day after the swearing in of his daughter, Shelley Moore Capito, as West Virginia's first woman to serve in the U.S. Senate. 

Moore served as West Virginia's Governor for three terms. First from 1969 to 1977 and again from 1985 to 1989. He also served as a member of the U.S. House of Representatives from 1957 to 1969.

According to a news release from Capito and her siblings, Moore passed away Wednesday evening in Charleston while surrounded by family.

    

Newly elected Republican Sen. Shelley Moore Capito has been tapped as counsel to new Republican Majority Leader Mitch McConnell.

Capito's office said Tuesday in a news release that the West Virginia senator is one of four counsel members McConnell has appointed in the new Congress.

The other Republican senators appointed as counsel are Rob Portman of Ohio, Deb Fischer of Nebraska and Mike Lee of Utah.

The release says the four senators will offer input, guidance and advice to the Republican leadership.