science

Back in 2015, we aired an episode called “Put Your Money Where Your Mouth Is” that didn’t go over so well with a bunch of our listeners. We received messages saying that Trey mishandled a conversation between a physicist who defends climate science and a former public school teacher who’s an evolution skeptic.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

A biologist is studying how some insects might be adapting to a changing climate. Scott Hotaling is studying stoneflies that live in glacial regions in the north, and how these animals might be evolving. We'll hear about a grant the city of Huntington is receiving to help first responders combat the drug abuse epidemic. 


Pixabay.com

A West Virginia-based NASA analyst with expertise in software has contributed to the Juno spacecraft's five-year, 1.8 billion-mile trip to Jupiter.

The solar-powered spacecraft entered Jupiter's orbit Monday, last leg of a $1.1 billion mission to gather scientific data and photograph the giant planet.

Jean Snedegar

Our newsroom recently teamed up with the producers of Inspiring West Virginians for a special episode of Inside Appalachia. The show features Mountain State natives who are leaders in business or a STEM field. STEM stands for science, technology, engineering and math. 

Roxy Todd

During January’s West Virginia Board of Education meeting, the Board voted to withdraw a controversial new policy that addresses how science teachers should teach climate change to public school students.

Folks have until 4:00 pm Tuesday February 17th, to weigh in on this new policy.

On Saturday, a STEM camp for middle school girls will be held at Shepherd University.

Students in teacher Joe Oliver's computer science class at South Charleston High School have successfully conducted a test launch of the CubeSat. 

Watch the student made video here and see the satellite soar into the sky, transmit pictures and students recovering the satellite after it landed back on earth.

Wednesday is #pbsTHINKday

Apr 8, 2014

Join West Virginia PBS every week for "Think Wednesdays," a primetime line-up of nature, science and technology programs.

“Think Wednesday” launches at 8 p.m. on April 9 with PBS’ long-running series Nature, presenting the best in original, natural history filmmaking. New episodes highlight animal prosthetics, Japanese snow monkeys and wild mule deer.

Rick Haye, Marshall University Communications

    

Biological Anthropologist Paul Constantino has decided that a 3-Dimensional printer is the next step in teaching his students about human evolution.

Beth Vorhees / W.Va. Public Broadcasting

Students at South Charleston High School are working on their own satellite.  It will be launched into space by NASA on a Soyez rocket sometime next year.  The satellite will gather all kinds of data and beam it back to the school for five years.  This is what it means to talk about STEM – science, technology, engineering and math and the students are pretty excited about it.

NOVA host coming to WV

Oct 15, 2013
David Pogue, Host of Nova scienceNow
PBS

Next week in Morgantown, a special symposium on energy will be bringing one of the nation’s most prominent faces in the field.

  David Pogue is a columnist for the New York Times, who also works as the host of the PBS program Nova Science Now.

Pogue is the keynote speaker for the Science, Technology and Research Symposium, or STAR symposium, coming up next week in Morgantown. Pogue says science is a field where there’s a lot of demand—a number of job opportunities are available—but not much supply—meaning, there just aren’t enough people to fill those jobs.

Rodney Bartgis 2013 Inspiring West Virginain
Jean Snedegar

Fifty-four-year-old Rodney Bartgis, state director of the West Virginia Nature Conservancy, stood atop Cave Mountain in Pendleton County, an elevation of 2,777 feet.

“It almost looks like the Rocky Mountains,” said Bartgis. “This is the biggest uplift of limestone in the eastern mountains of the United States, and a lot of the rare plants and animals in this canyon are associated with this limestone,” he said. 

Marshall University’s college of science is conducting an experiment that they hope will help them in the future.

The Marshall University College of Science installed a green roof in a small space just off the second floor of the science building. It’s the beginning of an experiment that will illustrate what it will take to maintain larger green roofs on the biotech building on campus. That building is being constructed. It’ll also play a role in Marshall’s continued effort to better handle storm water.

Chuck Somerville is the Dean of the College of Science.