Rep. Shelley Moore Capito

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Fayette County Democrats want state Democratic Party Chairman Larry Puccio to resign.

Rep. Shelley Moore Capito, R-W.Va., says that the current decline in coal-related employment is caused by many factors. But she says as a U.S. Senator, she would focus on the one she believes she can influence: environmental regulations.

In an interview with West Virginia Public Broadcasting, the candidate for U.S. Senate said the decline in coal jobs was caused by three things:

John Hale / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

    

  In rival U.S. Senate bids, Republican Shelley Moore Capito raised $1.6 million last quarter and still has $3.4 million in the bank, while Democrat Natalie Tennant brought in almost $1 million and has $1.1 million in her campaign account.

Capito takes the 3-to-1 cash edge into the race's homestretch, as the Nov. 4 election approaches.

With plenty of TV advertising, the two had a high-spending quarter.

Watch: Capito-Tennant U.S. Senate Debate

Oct 6, 2014

  Republican Shelley Moore Capito and Democrat Natalie Tennant are facing off in a debate for an open U.S. Senate seat.

Tuesday's debate will take place at the Clay Center for the Arts and Sciences in Charleston.

The West Virginia Press Association, AARP, West Virginia Public Broadcasting and MetroNews are organizing it.

Hoppy Kercheval of MetroNews will be the moderator.

The debate will also air live online and on West Virginia Public Broadcasting. Journalists will analyze the event in a post-debate special.

  The National Rifle Association is putting almost $218,000 toward ads opposing Democrat Natalie Tennant's bid for U.S. Senate.

Federal election records show the NRA's Political Victory Fund bought radio and Internet ad space last week.

Earlier this month, the NRA endorsed Republican Shelley Moore Capito against Tennant. The NRA also bought almost $44,000 in pro-Capito mailings.

Ashton Marra / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

The West Virginia Chamber of Commerce is focusing on energy, education and elections at their annual business summit in White Sulfur Springs this week, but the election component is taking a front seat as the Chamber hosts forums to allow candidates for Congressional offices to debate.

Scott Rotruck of the law firm Spillman Thomas and Battle served as moderator for the forum that had both Natalie Tennant and Shelley Moore Capito sitting on the same stage.

    

A bill in the House of Representatives says it will make airline taxes and fees clearer, but lobbyists say it'll prevent consumers from finding competitive flight prices. Grafton cleans up the downtown as part of the 'Turn This Town Around' project, and international students at Marshall University are taking a course on the ins and outs of the English language outside of the classroom.

Simone Ramella / flickr.com/photos/ramella/

Booking tickets with airlines rarely ever seems to be an enjoyable process. A bill in the House of Representatives would change that, but whether it’ll make it better or worse depends on who you ask.

The debate is over HR 4156, which has made it through its single committee reference and is expected to receive a vote by the full chamber in the coming weeks.

The bill is just four pages long, but don’t let that fool you. If passed, it could completely change the way you purchase airline tickets.

U.S. Rep. Shelley Moore Capito is asking federal health officials for more information about skin contact and inhaling a chemical that spilled in January.

U.S. Rep. Shelley Moore Capito wants to see a long-debated widening project finished on U.S. Route 35 in Mason and Putnam counties.
 
The West Virginia Republican took a tour Friday of a 14.6-mile section of the highway that remains two lanes. The four-lane highway starts at Interstate 64 in Putnam County and is a major truck and bus route connecting to southern Ohio and other points in the Midwest.

Ashton Marra / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

The U.S. House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee held a hearing Monday morning in Charleston to learn more about the Jan. 9 chemical spill into the Elk River that left 300,000 people banned from using tap water for up to 10 days.

The witness list included the president of West Virginia American Water, state health, homeland security and environmental officials, the chairman of the U.S. Chemical Safety Board and county emergency and homeland security officials.

Freedom Industries President Gary Southern was invited but did not attend.