ramps

Appalachian foodies will be interested to hear that the forests in Appalachia could be an ideal environment for growing mushrooms on logs in your own backyard.

The catch? It’s labor intensive, and if you want to sell your mushrooms to the public, you’ll need to show proof that your mushrooms are edible.

Still there are a handful of people in Appalachia who have been growing shiitake mushrooms for decades.

In this episode of Inside Appalachia, we’re taking a road trip through the region to find people who are reviving the old recipes and bringing something fresh to our plates. This episode is also helping us kick off a new segment, called Appetite Appalachia, which features restaurants and recipes with Appalachian roots.

Wendell Smith/Flickr

Here in Appalachia, it’s ramp season, and that means many small towns have their annual ramp feed to help raise money for their communities. This week we’ll travel to the Feast of the Ramson in Richwood, West Virginia, where we’ll meet 12-year-old ramp digger, Tyler McCune. And we’ll head to the Shenandoah Valley to hear a crowd of shape note singers. Although more and more people are leaving Appalachia, we will also hearing from some, like musician John Wyatt, who have returned home.

State Education Board Denies County Waiver Requests

Apr 9, 2015
West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On West Virginia Morning, Ashton Marra reports from a meeting of the state board of education where members considered requests from county school systems to waive the requirement for 180 days of instruction.  And we’ll re-visit a ramp feed in Richwood, known as the ramp capitol of the world.  These stories on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting – telling West Virginia’s story.


Thomas Mionchella

It's peak season for morel mushrooms throughout Appalachia. One online site, "WV Wild Pickers" Facebook page is getting a lot of traffic of people sharing stories and photos from their adventures foraging.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

With an expected population decline and negative stereotypes surrounding young people who choose to stay in the state, we hear a few proposed solutions for the issue. Evan Hansen of Downstream Strategies talks about the Department of Environmental Protection's public comment period for above-ground storage tank regulation. Also, Richwood sees a revival with their annual Feast of the Ramson.

    

The small town of Richwood, West Virginia once had a booming lumber and coal economy, but since the 1980s most of the jobs in town have left the area, as have 42% of the population. Every dollar is needed here, and the town relies on its annual Feast of the Ramson to help rejuvenate the local economy each April. Traveling 219′s Roxy Todd traveled to the Ramp Feed, and she talked to some of the younger generation about growing up in the Ramp Capital of the World.

West Virginia Morning on this Earth Day includes a report on healthcare in the state, considering some new technologies; also: Hippie Homesteaders and what they've brought to the state; and it's ramp season!