Race

Wikimedia Commons/ Snoopywv

High-profile confrontations between African-Americans and police officers have fueled racial tensions across the country. How do we in Appalachia talk about how these issues affect us here in the mountains?

American Friends Service Committee South Region

High-profile confrontations between African-Americans and police officers have fueled tensions across the country. West Virginia is NOT a place where people are comfortable talking about these things.

But in Trey's hometown of Charleston, some of the key players are now bringing this tension out into the open.

Trey Kay

Two rivers run through Charleston, West Virginia. While most of the city is situated on the Kanawha, it’s the Elk River that demarcates the West Side from the governmental and business center of Charleston. Today, the West Side is the poorest neighborhood in Charleston.

Caliber Comics

A few years back, West Virginia writer and filmmaker Danny Boyd stepped into the world of graphic novels, releasing books under his cult-classic Chillers franchise, as well as other stories. One of which was Carbon, a mythological world set in an alternative West Virginia and dealing with an ancient race of people and their effect on the coal industry thousands of years later. The follow-up, Salt, was released in late-2016 and picks up where Carbon left off. We spoke with Boyd about his latest graphic novel, some of the social and environmental issues addressed in the story and why he’s just now getting around to promoting it the way he would have liked.

The State of Race Relations in West Virginia

Jul 27, 2016

On West Virginia Morning, a discussion about race relations in West Virginia from two young black women.  One talks with two leaders at West Virginia University about the Black Lives Matter movement and a senior at West Virginia State University talks about her experience with racism. 

These stories on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting – telling West Virginia’s story.

22-year-old Takeiya Smith is a student at West Virginia State University, a historically black institution of higher education. Takeiya says over the past few years, as racial tensions have become more visible across the country, she’s become more vocal about the importance of racial justice, but she didn’t always like to speak up.  

While she was in middle and high school in Putnam county, Takeiya says she did experience racism, but she mostly kept quiet because she didn’t want to cause any trouble. In this interview, she talks about some of her experiences.

Glenn Elliot

With Election Day just a few weeks away, you’ve likely seen a political sign or two on a street corner in your town, or maybe in your neighbor’s front yard. Up in Wheeling, one community is responding to the defacing of a candidate’s sign after spray paint blackened out her face and racially disparaging phrases covered her name.

Kanawha Community Dicusses Racial Issues

Nov 4, 2015
Race Forum, WVSU
Clark Davis / WV Public Broadcasting

Members of the Kanawha County Community gathered at West Virginia State University earlier this week to discuss race and the ongoing battle for equality.

Community members, officials and students took part in a discussion at West Virginia State looking at different racial issues effecting West Virginia and Kanawha County. The discussion was organized by students and the American Friends Service Committee. 

Race organizers could soon have to pay fees to the city of Charleston for holding their event within city limits.

The Charleston Gazette reports the city's parks and recreation committee passed a bill outlining rules for the fees last night.

Several racing groups and charity organizations have spoken out against the bill, which calls for fees that range from 500 to a thousand dollars for 5 and 10K racecourses. The bill still needs the approval of city council.