Pregnant Women

Oxfordian Kissuth / wikimedia Commons

Health officials are gathering for a summit on how to reduce tobacco use among pregnant women in West Virginia.

The West Virginia Management of Maternal Smoking Initiative, also known by the acronym MOMS, will be unveiled at Wednesday's summit at the state Department of Health and Human Services in Charleston.

On Wednesday the House passed bill 4284, also known as the Pregnant Workers Fairness Act.

The bill’s purpose would be to prevent discrimination against pregnant women in the workplace.

The following would be considered an unlawful employment practice:

Chad Matlick / Dave Mistich / Information provided by the CDC

 

It's now been a week since the chemical spill at Freedom Industries in Charleston leaked roughly 7,500 gallons of crude MCHM into the Elk River and tainted the water supply of some 300,000 residents of the Kanawha Valley and surrounding areas. Many residents remain suspicious of the water quality after the State Bureau for Public Health--in conjunction with the Centers for Disease Control and
Prevention--advised pregnant women Wednesday night not to drink water until the chemical is untraceable in West Virginia American Water's system.

The West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources, based on a letter sent to Secretary Karen Bowling from the CDC, is advising pregnant women in the West Virginia American Water service area affected by last week's chemical spill in the Elk River to drink bottled water.

A news release says the Health Department consulted with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the CDC recommends pregnant women continue drinking bottled water until there are no longer detectable levels of the chemical in the water distribution system.