podcast

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Ten students from San Francisco are traveling around the area learning about the coal and gas industries thanks to an immersion trip taking place through Wheeling Jesuit University’s Appalachian Institute. Brownfield grants help improve the historic village of Middleway in the Eastern Panhandle. Harlem Globetrotter Johnny "Hawk" Thomas remembers his time in Huntington while playing for Marshall University.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Lawmakers try to make sense of the state budget in the absence of a few bills that Senator Roman Prezioso says needed to pass but didn't. Climate change researchers Lonnie and Ellen Thompson warn their audience about the carbon footprint we're making. One area of Huntington will soon see demolition and construction that could go a long way towards changing the city’s reputation.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

The staff of The Legislature Today--news director and anchor Beth Vorhees, Senate reporter Ashton Marra, and House reporter Aaron Payne--give a recap of the final hours the West Virginia Legislature's final hours on Saturday.  And hear from researcher at West Liberty University who discovering new species of crayfish in West Virginia.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, the Senate deals with minimum wage, the budget, and fracking waste while the House considers construction worker safety. We also have a special report on brain research from West Virginia University. And the Del McCoury Band is our featured musical guest in this week's Mountain Stage Song of the Week.

The House passed the Water Resources Protection and Management Act on Wednesday. The Senate passes their version of the budget bill and calls for $125 million to be used from the Rainy Day Fund. Healthcare lobbyist Thom Stevens outlines some of the more than 200 bills this session relating to healthcare, including the late-term abortion bill and a bill that would make pseudoephedrine available by  prescription only.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning we revisit an Inspiring West Virginian segment that profiles two of the world’s leading paleoclimatologists; that, legislators debate everything from deer farming to golf courses, and Cabell County School Board officials hope their new school is the next step in education.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, abortion and water resources are debated in the legislature; Jessica Lilly let's us in on how grade school kids are getting their groove on; and we hear about this year's Fasnacht festival in Helvetia.

The Senate Health and Human Resources Committee amends and passes a House bill that would prohibit abortions after 20 weeks. The House Finance Committee removes an amendment to the water protection bill that would force the state Bureau for Public Health to monitor the health those affected by the January 9 spill by Freedom Industries. West Virginia University President E. Gordon Gee speaks about his appointment as permanent chief of the school and his vision for its future.

An update on Governor Tomblin's legislative agenda and members of the Senate Government Organization Committee discuss a House bill that would reform the state Ethics Commission and reduce the number of members it requires. House committees discuss bills from the Senate, including the Future Fund and pay raises for teachers. Ted Boettner of the West Virginia Center on Budget and Policy about various issues, including taxes, the future fund, and the state budget.

Delegates from the House explain their feelings on how the session has gone thus far and Senators debate a bill that would establish a retirement program for private and small businesses that's backed by State Teasurer John Perdue.  Also, Phil Kabler of The Charleston Gazette and Dave Boucher of The Charleston Daily Mail discuss the state's finances, from the Governor dipping into the Rainy Day Fund to the budget hearings that will immediately follow the end of the regular session.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, college students are using a food pantry in Huntington. Food pantries for college students are becoming more popular.

Also, the clock is ticking down on getting bills passed through the hurdles of the legislature this session.

Also, Mary Chapin Carpenter and Shawn Colvin are on this Mountain Stage song of the week.

Bills relating to abortion, drilling waste, and the attorney general's office that were controversial in the House now make their way through the Senate. The House Judiciary Committee discusses expanding pretrial release programs. Soon-to-be-retiring Senator Brooks McCabe discusses the future of West Virginia through his thoughts on teacher pay raises, sustainable water quality, and the future fund.

The House of Delegates went through 60 items on their daily calendar on "Crossover Day," the last day for bills to be out of their house of origin. But, House Judiciary heard from environmental consulting firm Downstream Strategies as they examined Senate Bill 373, the bill that would regulate above-ground storage facilities. The Senate votes on 11 bills, debates three possible Constitutional Amendments, and also votes on the teacher pay raise bill.

A proposed amendment to the Crime Victim’s Compensation Fund divided the Senate Tuesday, but not necessarily on party lines. In the House, passionate debate arises on a bill that was introduced on the first day of session: The Government Fraud Protection Act (renamed from it's original incarnation known as The False Claims Act).  Paul Daugherty of Philanthropy West Virginia and Becky Cain-Ceperley of the Greater Kanawha Valley Foundation talk funding of non-profits and foundations looking to catalyze change around the state.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, new EPA regulations are on the way, on existing coal-fired power plants. A conference in Morgantown tries to sort out what's on the way.

In the State Legislature, the House of Delegates looks at a Zombie Bill, and the Senate looks at gun rights.

More than 20 bills pass through the Senate, but a couple bills brought the upper house's leadership to the podium to discuss next steps and, inevitably, they decide to lay the bills over until Tuesday. The House of Delegates deal with the collection of debts and their statute of limitations. U.S. Attorney Booth Goodwin and Captain Tim Bledsoe of the West Virginia State Police discuss heroin use around the state.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, teachers in West Virginia are doing the best they possibly can on low pay, and the state legislature is working to get them raises.

A new report argues fossil fuels should be here to stay, and a story about the effects of road salt.

The House of Delegates deal with a bill relating to conflicts of interest with the Attorney General's office and hold a public hearing on the future of toll collections in West Virginia. Senators in the Finance Committee decide to return to Gov. Tomblin's plans of a two percent pay raise for teachers after flirting with the idea of giving them a raise of $1,000. Capitol reporters Eric Eyre of The Charleston Gazette and Erin Timony of The State Journal talk with host Ashton Marra about the bill to limit sales of pseudoephedrine to prescription only and a bill that would prevent abortions after 21 weeks.  

The Senate amends a bill that would protect those seeking emergency medical attention for someone else experiencing a drug overdose and also discusses a bill that aims to reduce the variance gas prices across the state. The House  Judiciary Committee takes another look at the False Claims Act. Dr. Rahul Gupta of the Kanawha-Charleston Health Department talks medical monitoring and Gov. Tomblin's request to the CDC for more studies on the chemicals involved in the Jan. 9 chemical spill.

The Senate tackles issues related to corrections as well as roads. The  House Agriculture and Natural Resources Committee takes a look at bills related to timber theft and fertilizers. Department of Agriculture Commissioner Walt Helmick talks about farming issues around the state and Cecelia Mason highlights the work of the West Virginia Schools for the Deaf and Blind. Also, the students of those schools give a performance for Senate members to close out our show.

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