P.I. Reed School of Journalism

    

West Virginia University students recently finished up their final examinations for the school year. During this time period, of course, many stay up long hours to cram to prepare for the tests. And according to West Virginia University Journalism students who performed a research study, many are reaching for prescription drugs to prepare, without a prescription.

David Smith / WVU P.I. Reed School of Journalism

Last week, West Virginia University's P.I. Reed School of Journalism held a panel on how West Virginia media covered the January 9 chemical spill by Freedom Industries and the subsequent water crisis that affected some 300,000 West Virginians across nine counties.

David Smith/WVU PI Reed School of Journalism / West Virginia University

Panelists discussing the media coverage of the recent Elk River water crisis say digital media platforms played an important role in how they covered the story. More than 300 people were in attendance Monday night at West Virginia University to hear insights panelists gleaned from reporting on the crisis.

Some of those insights:

Social media allowed the journalists to interact with their audiences in new ways;

Traditional methods of reporting (phone calls, knocking on doors, filing FOIA requests) were absolutely essential to get the job done;

WVU Panel Looks Into Charleston Water Spill

Mar 21, 2014
Graphic Detailing the Elk River zone of critical concern, from downstream strategies new report.
Downstream Strategies

Monday evening, a special panel will be discussing the recent water spill into the Elk River.

This panel will be made up of journalists who covered the event, which affected the water supply of about 300,000 state residents.

This panel at West Virginia University is designed to analyze local and national coverage of this event. It will also discuss how crisis news coverage has changed, in today’s digital news media environment.

Maryanne Reed is the dean of West Virginia University’s P.I. Reed School of Journalism.

PBS Newshour via YouTube

On March 24, West Virginia Public Broadcasting reporter Ashton Marra will be one of five participants in "From Beats to Tweets: Media Coverage of the Elk River Spill" for the West Virginia University School of Journalism.  The panel discussion will examine local and national coverage of the event, and discuss the role of social media alongside traditional reporting in keeping the public informed and engaged throughout the events of the