Ohio Valley Resource

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, despite the Trump administration’s support for the coal industry, the power sector is moving toward more use of natural gas. Even the Ohio Valley, where coal has long been king, the switch to gas is under way, with big implications for the region’s economy and environment. In the first of two reports, Glynis Board reports on two facilities that illustrate the power struggle.

Glynis Board / West Virginia Public Broacasting

 

Thanks to singer-songwriter John Prine, Paradise Fossil Plant might be the only coal-fired power plant that has a household name. “Paradise,” Prine’s 1971 ballad, drew on boyhood memories from the small town of Paradise, in Muhlenberg County, Kentucky, to relay the environmental and social costs of our dependence on coal.

Steely Ban: Ohio Valley Steel Makers Await Trump Import Decision

Jul 13, 2017
Bob Jagendorf / Flickr

Steel makers and manufacturers around the Ohio Valley are waiting for a report from the Trump administration that could trigger higher tariffs on imported steel and bring mixed results for a region that still has strong ties to the industry.

In the presidential campaign Trump told voters he would place sanctions on steel imports from China and other countries, and the report being prepared by the Commerce Department could provide a rationale for new tariffs.

Rick Perry at Longview Power Plant
Glynis Board

Energy Secretary Rick Perry toured a modern and relatively clean coal-fired power plant in West Virginia in order to tout the benefits of coal in a competitive energy market. But the secretary’s comments generated some controversy.

High Hop(e)s: Craft Brewing Has Farmers Betting On Hops

Jun 26, 2017
HopAlong Farm in Howard, OH

The acres devoted to growing hops doubled in the U.S. in just the past five years and the trade group Hop Growers of America estimates that 95 percent of that market belongs to farmers along the West Coast. But the craft beer craze is changing the direction for hop farms by generating demand for more locally sourced ingredients, and Ohio Valley farmers like Wes Cole want in on the action.

Labor Gains: From Horseback to Hospitals

Jun 23, 2017
Mary Meehan

Dressed in crisp blue scrubs, Certified Nurse Midwife JoAnne Burris walks briskly, the click of her sensible clogs a counterpoint to smooth jazz in the hall.

The UK Midwife Clinic with large, color prints of newborns on the earth-tone walls, still has that new furniture smell. But word-of-mouth already has the waiting room full.

Inside Exam Room 3 Emily and Johnathan Robertson wait to hear their baby’s heartbeat.

And there it is the echoing “whoosh, ump, whoosh, ump, whoosh ump” of a strong fetal heart. “Best part of the appointment,” Burris said, “every time.”

Izzy Broomfield

Nearly half of the people living in rural parts of United States don’t have access to broadband internet, the high-speed connection required for common uses many of us take for granted. Government and survey data show that in 65 counties across Kentucky, Ohio, and West Virginia, most residents don’t have access to broadband -- that’s a quarter of all the counties in the three states.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, the Ohio Valley ReSource takes a look at the state of broadband internet  access in West Virginia, Ohio and Kentucky. We'll find out about how it's affecting commerce and economic development in central Appalachia.

We'll also hear about some grassroots and legislative efforts aimed at expanding broadband access to areas underserved by commercial communications companies.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, the Ohio Valley ReSource takes a closer look at small-scale farming in the region. It's one of the most dangerous industries and yet one of the least government-regulated. Find out what's being done to mitigate this growing hazard.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, we hear more from the Capitol, where lawmakers are taking a recess in the special session until June 5 so leaders of the House and Senate can work on a budget compromise.

We also hear from the Ohio Valley ReSource about how President Trump's latest national budget proposal might affect the region.

Steve Helber / AP Photo

The true costs of the deep cuts in President Donald Trump’s proposed budget would fall disproportionately on many of the poor and working class people in the Ohio Valley region who helped to elect him, according to lawmakers and policy analysts.

Deep cuts to subsidized health care, food aid, disability assistance, and addiction treatment services would have the biggest effect in parts of Kentucky, Ohio, and West Virginia with some of the nation’s greatest needs for these safety net programs.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On West Virginia Morning, Statehouse Reporter Ashton Marra reports from the Capitol after lawmakers returned for a special budget session last week.

And we hear from the Ohio Valley Resource's Mary Meehan who reports on the addiction crisis in the Ohio Valley which is causing another health problem in the region - a heart infection called endocarditis.

Heart Of The Matter: Needle Drug Use Brings Spike In Heart Infections

May 6, 2017
Alexandra Kanik / Ohio Valley ReSource

The Ohio Valley’s addiction crisis has brought another health problem, as rising numbers of needle drug users are contracting a serious form of heart infection called endocarditis. The rate of endocarditis doubled in the region over a decade, and many patients require repeated, expensive treatment and surgery as they return to drug use and once again become infected.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, we'll hear more from eighth-grade students at Wheeling Middle School who teamed up with Northern Panhandle Bureau Chief Glynis Board to report and produce stories and commentaries about the issues that affect them the most.

We'll also hear an update from The Ohio Valley ReSource about an effort in Congress to save retired miners' benefits.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, we very sadly say goodbye to broadcasting icon Beth Vorhees, who retired on April 28 after more than three decades at West Virginia Public Broadcasting. Dave Mistich talks with Vorhees about her career and what's next.

We'll also hear about an effort to identify and study places that are bucking negative statistical trends in the area, including Wirt Couty, West Virginia.

Bright Spots: Positive Outliers In a Region Plagued By Poor Health

Apr 29, 2017

By most measures, health outcomes in the Ohio Valley region are not very good, with many parts of Kentucky, Ohio and West Virginia ranking near the bottom among states.

But a team of health researchers may have found a few places within the region that stand out. They see them as potential ‘bright spots’ -- places with some health measures better than expected for the region.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On West Virginia Morning, Dave Mistich talks with Daniel Flatley, a Wheeling native and Columbia University graduate student, about his thesis “Patriot Coal: An American Bankruptcy” and Benny Becker reports from Pikeville, Kentucky where white supremacists are planning a march amid counter demonstrations.  

That’s on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting – telling West Virginia’s story.

There's a Wage Gap in the Ohio Valley Region

Apr 24, 2017
West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On West Virginia Morning, Becca Shimmel with the Ohio Valley Resource reports on the wage gap in the Ohio Valley and we hear from people who experience chronic pain and the stigma that comes with it.

These stories on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting - telling West Virginia's story.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On West Virginia Morning, President Trump has proposed a 20 percent cut in funding for agriculture, just as farmers and food banks have partnered to provide fresh produce to the poor and we’ll hear another conversation about religious faith and cultural identity.

That’s on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting – telling West Virginia’s story.

Hunger Gains: Budget Cuts Imperil Nutritious Food Aid

Apr 16, 2017
Volunteers sort donations at Lexington-based God’s Pantry.
Mary Meehan / Ohio Valley ReSource

At a moment when food aid agencies are working to provide healthier food to the poor and the elderly, President Donald Trump has proposed a 21 percent cut in funding for the agriculture programs that support them.

It’s a move that advocates say is bad for people who need food and local farmers who provide it.

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