Natural Gas Pipelines

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, the central Appalachian coalfields are in the middle of an unprecedented epidemic of severe black lung disease. A recent medical study confirmed a cluster of more than 400 cases of the most severe form of black lung at just a few clinics, and an investigation by NPR and the Ohio Valley ReSource identified nearly 2,000 cases across Kentucky, Virginia and West Virginia. The condition, caused by coal mine dust, is often debilitating and deadly. Reporter Benny Becker brings us the stories of two men struggling with the disease.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, pipeline protesters have been camped along the Potomac River in Maryland and West Virginia all summer long. They don’t want to see the 3.5-mile TransCanada natural gas pipeline built underneath the river. Liz McCormick reports, pipeline supporters argue the line is critical to expanding natural gas resources to businesses and homes in the growing Eastern Panhandle. 

Pipeline ready for construction.
Seth Perlman / Associated Press

The Senate has approved two Republicans nominated by President Donald Trump to serve on the federal commission that oversees the nation’s power grid and natural gas pipelines.

Senators’ unanimous votes Thursday approving Senate aide Neil Chatterjee and Pennsylvania utility regulator Robert Powelson restore a voting quorum on the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission.

They landed, one after another, in 2015: plans for nearly a dozen interstate pipelines to move natural gas beneath rivers, mountains and people's yards. Like spokes on a wheel, they'd spread from Appalachia to markets in every direction.

Together these new and expanded pipelines — comprising 2,500 miles of steel in all — would double the amount of gas that could flow out of Pennsylvania, Ohio and West Virginia. The cheap fuel will benefit consumers and manufacturers, the developers promise.

Jesse Wright / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Three advocacy groups in Virginia want federal regulators to rescind or revise an environmental assessment of the Atlantic Coast Pipeline because they say it lacks meaningful analysis.

Pipeline ready for construction.
Seth Perlman / Associated Press

A proposed natural gas pipeline that would cross West Virginia, Virginia and North Carolina would have adverse environmental impacts, but most could be avoided, minimized or mitigated, according to an analysis federal regulators released this week.

Mountain Valley Pipeline, LLC

State and federal agencies are calling for a more complete assessment of the environmental impact of a proposed natural gas pipeline that would run through Virginia.

The Roanoke Times reported Friday that Virginia's Department of Environmental Quality weighed in on the draft environmental impact statement for the proposed Mountain Valley Pipeline, which would transport natural gas from West Virginia to another pipeline in Pittsylvania County.

Matt Welsch

President-elect Donald Trump isn't saying what he'll do about the $3.8 billion, four-state Dakota Access oil pipeline once he takes office in January. A spokesman for  Trump said Monday that the incoming president supports construction of the pipeline. But he wouldn't say whether Trump would reverse an Army Corps of Engineers decision to deny a permit for the pipeline to cross under a Missouri River reservoir in southern North Dakota.  The Standing Rock Sioux says the project threatens cultural sites and drinking water on its nearby reservation.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On West Virginia Morning, Republicans have officially nominated Donald Trump for President of the United States.  Host Beth Vorhees talks with Bill Cole, the Republican nominee for Governor of West Virginia and a report about natural gas pipelines that are criss crossing the Northeast.  Are they leaking methane gas? 

These stories on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting – telling West Virginia’s story.

gavel
wikimedia / Wikimedia

The Supreme Court of Virginia is considering the arguments of a group of southwest landowners in the path of a natural gas pipeline.

Justices heard an appeal Tuesday in Richmond involving the Mountain Valley Pipeline. Its route covers 300 miles in West Virginia and Virginia.

pipeline
AP Photo/Sergii Ryzhkov

Columbia Gas Transmission has filed an application with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission for a natural gas pipeline project in West Virginia and Virginia.

Parent companies Columbia Pipeline Group Inc. and Columbia Pipeline Partners LP said Friday that Columbia Gas is proposing to construct and operate two compressor stations, replace 26 miles of pipeline along existing corridors and built 2.9 miles of new pipeline in the two states.

pipeline
AP Photo/Sergii Ryzhkov

Opponents of a proposed 550-mile natural gas pipeline are asking a West Virginia county to support their efforts seeking a combined review of that energy project and others.

The Exponent Telegram reports that the Virginia chapter of the Sierra Club delivered its request Thursday before the Upshur County Commission.

Mountain Valley Pipileine, LLC.

A judge has ruled that the developer of a proposed natural gas pipeline can’t survey a West Virginia couple’s property without their permission.

Monroe County Circuit Court Judge Robert Irons said Mountain Valley Pipeline failed to show that the project would provide sufficient public use to justify entering private property without an owner’s permission.

Tim Kiser / Wikimedia Commons

The U.S. House Natural Resources Committee passed a bill this week that calls for the creation of 10 natural gas pipeline corridors through federal lands within 2 years of the bill’s passage.

The committee passed HR 2295, also known as the National Energy Security Corridors Act, on a vote of 21-15, essentially along party lines. Rep. Alex Mooney, R-W.Va., sits on the Natural Resources Committee and voted for the bill. Rep. David McKinley, also R-W.Va., co-sponsored the bill.