music

Ask anyone who has worked on Mountain Stage or has been to the show more than a few times and they'll tell you picking a favorite show or act would be like asking someone to choose their favorite child. There's simply been too much incredible music to whittle it down to just one or two favorites.

Vasilia Scouras / Mountain Stage

Lyle Lovett - "Cowboy Man"

First off, Merry Christmas!

Hello again and welcome back (presuming, of course, you stopped by for the first installment in this series a few days ago)! While Monday's post is a nice run-down of the earliest moments of Mountain Stage, from here on out you can expect some incredible performances from a wide range of artists included in 'Mountain Stage at 30: A Radio Retrospective'.

These Mountain Stage performances from the 1980s will be digitized as part of the Digital Archive Project.
Josh Saul / Mountain Stage

Probably--well, not probably, most definitely--the most fun part of producing a documentary on 30 years of Mountain Stage is getting to cull through the archives of 2,000 hours of live performance radio. It's daunting, humbling, and exciting all in one. There's music recorded on virtually every format: reel to reel, DAT, miniDisc--you name it--they've got it on that medium.

Joseph Adams / wikimedia Commons

Jefferson County commissioners are considering banning large music festivals in the county.

For 30 years and with over 800 episodes, Mountain Stage has been a mainstay in public radio and American music.

Like anything that evolves into a lasting endeavor, Mountain Stage’s success is part happenstance mixed with years of dedication and hard work. Truly, though, it all comes down to the people who made the show possible coming together with a shared vision.

Folks in fracking country Pennsylvania work on air pollution issues.

Kentucky college students are having a blast- with some mine research.

America’s Test Kitchen has an Appalachian connection.

And we learn about the famed Fairfax Stone.

Andy Ridenour and Larry Groce
Mountain Stage

Have you ever wondered how Mountain Stage got started? Retrace the show's history Thursday (Thanksgiving) night at 8:00 p.m., when Mountain Stage at 30: A Radio Retrospective premieres on West Virginia Public Radio.

Listen to a preview of how Larry Groce, Andy Ridenour and Francis Fisher helped start this West Virginia tradition and how they've keep the show going strong for 30 years. 

Update: You can watch the performances from the West Virginia Music Hall of Fame here.  

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When the West Virginia Music Hall of Fame inductedtheir 5th class on Saturday night, a wide swath of musical styles wasbe featured.

The West Virginia Music Hall of Fame will induct its latest class of notable musicians Saturday, November 16.  West Virginia PBS and West Virginia Public Radio will air the ceremony live from the Culture Center Theater in Charleston at 8 p.m. Executive Director Michael Lipton considers the induction ceremony and the short video bios about the artists being inducted as historical documents that highlight the diverse array of musical styles for which West Virginia is known.

Josh Saul

Lori McKenna has become one of Nashville's most in-demand singer-songwriters, even though she didn't begin making music of her own until she was in her mid-20's. Here she performs "If I Could By This Town," on an episode of Mountain Stage recorded on the north shore of Lake Superior in Grand Marais, Minnesota.

The Pines - "Rise Up and Be Lonely"

Oct 23, 2013
Josh Saul

The lush, dark, and atmospheric sounds Twin Cities band The Pines evoke the steely autumn breeze coming off the shore of Lake Superior, where this week's premiere episode of Mountain Stage was recorded.

Find your local affiliate and listen to the entire show this week.

Bottle Rockets - "Big Lotsa Love"

Oct 17, 2013
bottle rockets on mounain stage 2013
Brian Blauser

Roots rock heroes The Bottle Rockets return to Mountain Stage with a love song - and a story - inspired by a new guitar, and frontman Brian Henneman's wife's favorite discount shopping location.

Find your local affiliate and listen to the entire show this week.

Bill Monroe on Mountain Stage 1989
Mountain Stage

This week's special broadcast from the Mountain Stage archives looks back to 1989, when we were joined by the father of bluegrass music, Bill Monroe. Here he plays what many consider to be his signature tune, "Uncle Pen."

Find your local affiliate and listen to the entire show this week.

Story telling is an old art form in Appalachia. One West Virginia story teller’s newest project, a CD of music and stories entitled The Mountain Came Alive, attempts to modernize this tradition by addressing today’s concerns.

The CD combines Booth’s interest in music and storytelling with 20 tracks that follow the year in the life of a southern West Virginia mountain that is slated for strip mining.

Booth said he wanted to use traditional methods to tell a story to young people about Appalachia and events in the region that are happening now.

On this West Virginia Morning, Beth Vorhees speaks with West Virginia Public Broadcasting Executive Director Scott Finn about our new website, Cecelia Mason speaks with  musician and storyteller Adam Booth about his work and Glynis Board brings us an audio postcard from OglebayFest.

Clifftop - the Appalachian String Band Music Festival.

Sep 20, 2013

  A documentary look at the Appalachian String Band Music Festival -aka Clifftop - where many of the participants are musicians. Each night at any given moment,there are literally a hundred jam sessions going on. The documentary  also explores the evolving concepts behind Old Time. Also featured are interviews and performances of legendary West Virginia fiddler Lester McCumbers.

West Virginia Morning - Sept. 19, 2013

Sep 19, 2013

On this WV Morning, learn about the music scene in the state, hear from a law professor about new threats to the coal industry, and hear the history of famous Omie Wise ballad.

Andy Pickens

Eight years ago three friends at Shepherd University started a band. The Demon Beat’s popularity grew from the restaurants and pubs around Shepherdstown to audiences across the state and region. The band just made a run around the state before taking a hiatus.

“Personally whenever I hear terms like ‘this is a garage rock band’ or ‘a back to basics raw sound’, those are just really tired phrases when you hear people talk about that,” said Morgantown musician and close friend of the band, Billy Matheny.

“When you listen to The Demon Beat and when you see them live, in both cases, I think it’s everything a rock experience should be. It is raw and it is immediate. More than anything, it’s fun to listen to. That’s kind of everything you want out of that experience,” he added.

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