music

Shawn Corrigan

"Had we not chosen to be in Morgantown, TeamMate wouldn’t exist."

Courtesy of the artist

"As an artist, you’re your own product. When all you see is everyone’s best and all you feel is your worst, it can be so defeating and crippling to be stuck in this place of 'Why am I not there yet?'"

Patrick Garvey

"[The Phantom Six] never went away. I’m not one of these guys who can get a record out every two years, but it’s consistent though. I’ve kept doing it for a long time. I don’t plan on stopping."

Jess Keathly

"There is so much killer music that comes out of here, and always has. It’s amazing to join in on the tradition of West Virginia music."

J.R. Smiley

"I like my tunes and melodies to be disarming and my themes to be disturbing. It is my exact intent."

Allie Hughes

"Whenever the music scene overlaps with each other's camps, you start building new relationships with people who wouldn't have had the chance to meet otherwise. It's a win-win for everybody."

Katie Fallon

Summer is often a time for road trips, so we put together a few stories that made us think of summer break. And our Struggle to Stay series continues as we catch up with Mark Combs on his journey to find a home outside of West Virginia.

Burns Exposures

"People want something tangible, something they can hold, something of substance. This is one of vinyl's greatest strengths."

Michelle Waters

"It’s kind of outrageous to think that the only place credible music business is done is Nashville. People listen to and play music everywhere, so why only do business in Nashville? It doesn’t make sense to me."

Courtesy of the artist

"It’s fun to see how we can use the [WVU School of Music] techniques we spent so many years perfecting for something completely different. It’s interesting to show people what you can do with classical music."

Rebekah Call

"The space around you, the space between notes, the space between people in a relationship… that’s all explorable. The chords aren’t as powerful without the space in-between."

Courtesy of the artist

"All-ages punk music scenes were my gateway into this whole thing."

Ginger Willis

"Expect to lose money, but don't let it deter you. If you are just starting out, don't expect some big pay day. You will pay out more than you take in."

Joel Prince

"I want to help push all music, be a part of all music. I never want to be in a box."

Lori Kilgore Miller

"We never set out to be that band that plays three hours of just [covers]. We wanted to have our own sound. I think we’re on that track."

"If I ever need humbled, I can remember that I live in the same town that Vince Gill does [laughing]. If I ever feel like, 'Oh man, I’m really sounding good on guitar,' I can just remember that I’m probably not even the best guitar player on the block."

Roger May/ Looking at Appalachia

In this episode of Inside Appalachia, we talk about faith and music. We learn about Sister Rosetta Tharpe,  one of the first great recording stars of gospel music, find our the story behind a song that became an American icon, and we’ll learn more about a project Glory that depicts images of Pentecostal style tent revival in Kentucky and West Virginia.

Josh Saul / Mountain Stage

Warren Zevon was a beloved cult hero in the world of rock music. Born in Chicago but raised on the West Coast, Zevon began his music career as a classical piano student before broadening his admiration of Stravinsky to The Everly Brothers and other folk and pop icons.

Zevon’s stoic vocals and gallows songwriting led to critical acclaim and popular success, eventually leading to his 1978 hit “Werewolves of London.” Although he could certainly be “Mr. Bad Example,” Zevon was an artist’s artist, one that we were proud to welcome twice to the Mountain Stage

Rose Cousins
Brian Blauser / Mountain Stage

In 2007, Canadian artist Rose Cousins was chosen as one of five co-winners in the Mountain Stage NewSong Contest for performing songwriters. A decade (and a couple Mountain Stage performances) later, the Juno award-winning singer-songwriter returned to NPR's Mountain Stage with songs from her new record Natural Conclusion.

Josh Saul / saulphoto.com

Last summerJoni Deutsch's 30 Days of #WVmusic series celebrated the minds and music shaping the new culture of West Virginia.

We heard from poster makers to festival creatorsR&B folkers to venue owners from the Northern Panhandle down to the Southern Coalfields.

The series amplified West Virginia's music scene to national media outlets like NPR Music and Poynter, all while forging life-long musical friendships and collaborations within our own state.

This summer, we hope to do it all over again with 30 brand new features packed into 30 days, but we need YOUR help.

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