Mountain Valley Pipeline

Monroe County
David Benbennick / Wikimedia Commons

An earthquake that struck parts of Virginia and West Virginia appears to have left little to no damage.

The Roanoke Times reported Wednesday that the quake shook parts of the New River Valley shortly after 1:30 p.m. No damage was immediately reported.

Pipeline ready for construction.
Seth Perlman / Associated Press

West Virginia environmental regulators are rescinding approval for building the Mountain Valley Pipeline, which would carry natural gas down the center of West Virginia for 195 miles.

In a letter Thursday, the Department of Environmental Protection said it's vacating the water quality certification issued in March, which followed review of the projected impact on the state's waters and public hearings.

Pipeline ready for construction.
Seth Perlman / Associated Press

A lawsuit filed Thursday is challenging the company that wants to build a 300-mile pipeline through West Virginia and Virginia, and the federal agency that oversees it.

West Virginia Gov. Jim Justice talks about his budget proposal during a stop on his Save Our State Tour on Thursday, March 3, 2017, at Fairmont State University.
Jesse Wright / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

The Justice administration has refused to schedule a hearing on an appeal of the Mountain Valley Pipeline's authorization.

The Charleston Gazette-Mail reports Department of Environmental Protection Secretary Austin Caperton signed a letter last week denying a request for a hearing challenging the DEP's approval of a Clean Water Act certification for the MVP. The letter was sent to Appalachia Mountain Advocates, an environmental law firm that challenged the authorization.

Mountain Valley Pipeline, LLC

West Virginia environmental authorities have issued a water quality certification for the proposed Mountain Valley Pipeline, which would carry natural gas down the center of West Virginia for 195 miles.

The certification required by the Federal Clean Water Act concerns impact on West Virginia waters.

The Department of Environmental Protection says project impacts will require the builder to purchase credits to be used to improve streams and wetlands around the state.

Pipeline ready for construction.
Seth Perlman / Associated Press

West Virginia residents were divided during the final state public hearing on the proposed Mountain Valley Pipeline, which would carry natural gas down the center of West Virginia for 195 miles.

Several urged state permit approvals for the project and its jobs. Some others at the Thursday hearing warned of damage from construction, erosion and the aerial herbicide spraying along the right of way that would continue perpetually.

Mountain Valley Pipeline, LLC

State and federal agencies are calling for a more complete assessment of the environmental impact of a proposed natural gas pipeline that would run through Virginia.

The Roanoke Times reported Friday that Virginia's Department of Environmental Quality weighed in on the draft environmental impact statement for the proposed Mountain Valley Pipeline, which would transport natural gas from West Virginia to another pipeline in Pittsylvania County.

pipeline
AP Photo/Sergii Ryzhkov

The West Virginia Supreme Court is refusing to allow the developer of a proposed natural gas pipeline to survey landowners' property without their permission.

Monroe County Circuit Court Judge Robert Irons ruled in August 2015 that pipeline officials hadn't proved the project would provide sufficient public use to justify entering private property without an owner's permission.

pipeline
AP Photo/Sergii Ryzhkov

The lawyer for the proposed Mountain Valley Pipeline has asked the West Virginia Supreme Court to overturn a lower court order that blocked the developer from surveying Monroe County landowners' property without their permission.

The survey work has been halted since Monroe County Circuit Court Judge Robert Irons' ruled in August 2015 that pipeline officials hadn't established that the project would provide sufficient public use to justify entering private property without an owner's permission.

Mountain Valley Pipeline, LLC

A controversial 300-mile gas pipeline that would cut through Virginia and West Virginia is one step closer to becoming a reality.

pipeline
AP Photo/Sergii Ryzhkov

Archaeologists say they've found Native American artifacts on property in the path of the proposed Mountain Valley Pipeline.

The Roanoke Times reports archaeologists have found arrowheads, tools and pottery on a property in Rocky Mount.

The Legislature Today
West Virginia Public Broadcasting


The GOP majority in both chambers have received plenty of criticism and support this legislative session for taking on controversial issues like Right-to-Work and the Religious Freedom Restoration Act.

 

West Virginians on either side of the issue have made their stances known through social media campaigns and rallies at the statehouse, and many opposed are turning those feelings into political fuel for the upcoming primary and general elections.

 

Curtis Wilkerson with Orion Strategies discusses a poll recently conducted by the firm about both legislative and political issues.

pipeline
AP Photo/Sergii Ryzhkov

Federal regulators have rejected a request to assess the overall environmental impact of several proposed multistate natural gas pipelines.

A coalition of pipeline opponents had sought the review. They argued that individual assessments would be piecemeal and conducted in a vacuum.

pipeline construction
Emmuzka / wikimedia commons

Seventeen groups in Virginia and West Virginia are seeking a say on a 301-mile natural gas pipeline that would carve a path through both states.

The groups are seeking so-called intervenor status with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission in its review of the Mountain Valley pipeline.

pipeline construction
Emmuzka / wikimedia commons

Energy companies have formally filed with federal regulators to build a 300-mile natural gas pipeline from West Virginia through southern Virginia.

Mountain Valley Pipeline announced Friday it applied to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to build the pipeline from Wetzel County, West Virginia, to Pittsylvania County, located in Southside Virginia.

Mountain Valley Pipileine, LLC.

A judge has ruled that the developer of a proposed natural gas pipeline can’t survey a West Virginia couple’s property without their permission.

Monroe County Circuit Court Judge Robert Irons said Mountain Valley Pipeline failed to show that the project would provide sufficient public use to justify entering private property without an owner’s permission.

Jesse Wright / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

 

The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, or FERC as it’s known, held an environmental scoping meeting for the Mountain Valley Pipeline (MVP) on Tuesday, May 12, at Jackson’s Mill in Lewis County. The vast majority of those who spoke said they don’t want to see the pipeline built.

 

Harrison County landowner Autumn Long said she’s concerned about several aspects of the project, including potential environmental damage. But she also spoke against the idea that the project might supply West Virginian homes and businesses with gas, as she says has been suggested in a report the pipeline company filed about the project.

Teach for America Coming to West Virginia

May 13, 2015
West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On West Virginia Morning, a report from Lewis County where most of those attending a meeting spoke against the proposed Mountain Valley natural gas pipeline.  And we’ll learn about Teach For America.  A new law allows recruits from that organization to teach in the state’s classrooms.  These stories on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting – telling West Virginia’s story.


Mountain Valley Pipeline, LLC

West Virginians can have a say about the environmental impact of the proposed Mountain Valley Pipeline at four public meetings.

EQT and its partners want to build a 42-inch diameter, 330-mile pipeline from Wetzel County in West Virginia to Pittsylvania, Virginia.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On West Virginia Morning, citizens in Monroe County are concerned that a proposed natural gas pipeline comes too close to an historic hotel.  And Randy Newman performs the Mountain Stage Song of the Week. 

These stories on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting – telling West Virginia’s story.


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