The Legislature Today

The Legislature Today
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

  On The Legislature Today, West Virginia is one step closer to becoming a Right to Work state after a vote on the Senate floor. And members of the House will consider another union opposed bill next week, a repeal of the state’s prevailing wage. The minority leaders of both chambers join us tonight to discuss these controversial bills and others they’ll proposed to the GOP majority. That conversation coming up on The Legislature Today.

The Legislature Today
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

In the first episode of The Legislature Today of 2016, host Ashton Marra sits down with Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin to discuss how he is proposing the state close a $381 million budget gap expected by the end of the fiscal year. 

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The West Virginia House of Delegates approved a resolution Wednesday setting up a committee to tackle substance abuse issues in the state.

On the first day of the 2016 session, the West Virginia House of Delegates passed House Resolution 3, creating the Select Committee on Prevention and Treatment of Substance Abuse.

Watch Concealed Weapons, Water Protection Public Hearings on WVPB.2

Mar 3, 2015
Ashton Marra / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

It's been an historic session of the West Virginia Legislature, and West Virginia Public Broadcasting is proud to announce expanded, live coverage during the final two weeks of the regular session.

At the legislature today, both chambers have started to move on Governor Tomblin's bill to aid the state's craft brewing industry. In the House, the bill received some minor changes in committee. Senators are still working to craft a bill that would allow charter schools in West Virginia weeks after the process began. And we'll talk with the senate president now that the session is passed the halfway point on The Legislature Today.

  At the legislature today, legislation limiting abortions is on its way to the Senate after the House passed the bill overwhelmingly today.  Uber, the international car service, wants to do business in West Virginia, but legislators have concerns.  And we’ll talk with the Secretary of the Department of Environmental Protection about the bill to roll back the aboveground storage tank law on The Legislature Today.

At the legislature today, emotional debate in both houses as the Senate takes up the Coal Jobs and Safety Act of 2015. In the House, Delegates focused on the legal remedies those hurt or killed in a mining accident will have. And we'll talk with Agriculture Commissioner Walt Helmick about his plans to grow the state's economy on The Legislature Today.

At the legislature today, Republican leaders are one step closer to realizing their tort reform goals this session as the Senate passes a bill imposing comparative fault. The amended bill heads back to the House for its approval. And on tourism day at the legislature, we'll meet the new Tourism Commissioner and find out her priorities to grow the number of visitors to the state. These stories and more coming up on The Legislature Today.

At the legislature today, the House approves a bill that inserts the legislature into the state Department of Environmental Protection’s plans to comply with US EPA carbon emission standards. That measure now goes to the senate where passage is expected. And a year after the Kanawha Valley water crisis, things are back to normal for the 300,000 West Virginians affected, but some residents of McDowell County are just getting clean water after years without it. A special report on water and more coming up on The Legislature Today.

At the legislature today, there was some intense debate on the house floor as lawmakers took up two bills that are priorities for the new majority. Also at the Capitol, labor unions rally against a Senate bill repealing the state's prevailing wage. And West Virignia's craft beer makers are seeking some regulatory relief. They have the backing of Governor Tomblin, but what do lawmakers think of the industry? We'll meet the chairs of the small business committees to find out on The Legislature Today.

  At the legislature today, as a measles outbreak makes national headlines, a senate committee considered a bill to provide  religious and medical exemptions for vaccinations. But after further discussion, the religious exemption is off the table.  We’ll talk about this and other health issues with the Chairman of the House Health Committee on The Legislature Today.

At the legislature today, lawmakers were updated on a bill that passed two years ago and its effect on overcrowding in the state's jails and prisons. But correction officials say it will take more money to continue implementing the new law.

And does the state Public Service Commission have too much control over your local water utility? Some small public service districts say yes.

These stories plus a look the education issues facing lawmakers on The Legislature Today.

At the legislature today, there was confusion in the House Government Organization Committee this morning as lawmakers discuss a bill about an airport located in West Virginia but apparently governed by officials in Maryland.  

We also continue to meet the new leaders at this legislative session.  Joining us tonight the chairs of the powerful finance committees on The Legislature Today. 

At the legislature today, the first of many tort reforms bills was up for debate in the House of Delegates.  Republicans have said for years such legal reforms are necessary to make the state more business friendly. 

Also, lawmakers hear about a new idea to improve roads and highways. 

These stories, plus we’ll talk with the new minority leaders on The Legislature Today.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FPVbOQ1o9j4

As the first full week of the session comes to a close, bills are slowly moving through the legislative process. 

We’ll review the week with Jon Mattise of the AP and Mandi Cardosi of The State Journal, who are also covering the issues around the Rotunda.

And, we’ll profile Senator Donna Boley of Pleasants County.  A veteran lawmaker she has gone from the only Republican in the Senate to now, the only woman there.  

High drama in the House of Delegates as tempers flare over the repeal of a bill regarding alternative fuels and renewable energy, even though the bill passed overwhelmingly.

Pro-choice advocates rallied at the state capitol today over the newly introduced bill to restrict abortions in West Virginia.

And we’ll talk about the public education system with state Board of Education president Gayle Manchin.

  Speaker Tim Armstead takes over as the first Republican to fill the top role in the House of Delegates for the first time since the Capitol has been in its current location. But what are his and his party's plans?

The Department of Transportation gives a budget presentation in the House Finance Committee and concerns remain over the quality of roads affected by drilling the Marcellus Shale.

That and more on this episode of The Legislature Today.

Senate President Bill Cole joins us to talk about legislative priorities after the Republican takeover following November's midterm election. 

The chair of the Senate Committee on Labor pulled a bill from the committee's agenda Tuesday, Senate Bill 245, a bill that aims to repeal the state's prevailing wage requirement.   

Also, members of the House Agriculture committee handle a bill that looks to use old mountaintop removal sites for hog farming.

Governor Earl Ray Tomblin joined us to speak about another tight budget year and how his legislative agenda will play out in a GOP-controlled statehouse.

A piece of legislation that would repeal a 2009 energy bill progressed through both chambers at the state house Monday, but that bill is changing shape as it makes its way through both chambers. 

Also, as session began last week there were some tense moments during a discussion of rules in the House of Delegates.

Danny Jones
City of Charleston

Charleston Mayor Danny Jones says he will meet with Governor Tomblin very soon and ask him to veto a gun bill passed by the legislature last week.

Senate Bill 317 makes gun laws uniform state wide. But the bill defines a municipally owned recreation facility as a swimming pool, recreation center, sports facility housing an after school program or other similar facility where children are regularly present.  The bill permits a person to carry a lawfully possessed weapon into such a center, as long as it is stored out of view.

Mayor Jones is pretty upset about it.

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